Tesco next down the pan?

I think I've only ever been in one once - years ago. I was looking for a computer desk and their stuff was poor quality, pricey tat.

I've often wondered what is the customer base of places like Staples? Offices and companies will already have their own suppliers. Is Staples meant for one-man bands?
You'll struggle to get elastic bands now let alone for one man bands
 

49er

On ROPS
On ROPs
I think I've only ever been in one once - years ago. I was looking for a computer desk and their stuff was poor quality, pricey tat.

I've often wondered what is the customer base of places like Staples? Offices and companies will already have their own suppliers. Is Staples meant for one-man bands?
Same here,just the once. Was looking for one of those swivel chairs for my PC set up. I walked out after 5minutes, customer service was on a par with PC World ie shite.
 
Top Tip. If you want elastic bands, just follow any Postie. They drop them all over the place,for some reason.
Ah Postie's.... I followed one in my car one fine day after retrieving the parcel that had bounced off the idiot's roof. His route around town became more bizarre the longer I followed him, and I realised that he was crapping himself thinking he was about to fall victim to a heist. When he eventually did stop, in the busiest place he could find, and got out of the car, he was visibly pale and practically shaking.

Tosser didn't even have a black cat.
 
If it was for me, and I am guesstimating without any market research and gut felling, Tesco, would've been better off launching in the NYC area and expanding from there. Having lived enough in both NYC and LON, the habits are quite a bit in sync - maybe not the same, but close enough. But that's my personal hunch that they would've been better off launching in the East Coast - NYC, maybe even D.C. and taking it forward from there. But what do I know?
 
I did enjoy shopping in Whole Foods when I was working in Chicago last summer.
Imagine a very hip Waitrose aimed at the 20-30's market. A great selection of food and drink compared to many US supermarket chains.
 
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I did enjoy shopping in Whole Foods when I was working in Chicago last summer.
Imagine a very hip Waitrose aimed at the 20-30's market. A great selection of food and drink compared to many US supermarket chains.
There's Whole Foods in London too, but not quite the same range or selection.
 
I think I've only ever been in one once - years ago. I was looking for a computer desk and their stuff was poor quality, pricey tat.

I've often wondered what is the customer base of places like Staples? Offices and companies will already have their own suppliers. Is Staples meant for one-man bands?
Lots of SMEs use Staples and the like. They don’t consume enough stationary to get a wholesale account and don’t want to hold large inventories. What isn’t needed is a bricks and mortar store, not when orders take less than a day to receive. What bests me is why anyone bought Staples retail business when they moved to eCommerce.
 
Lots of SMEs use Staples and the like. They don’t consume enough stationary to get a wholesale account and don’t want to hold large inventories. What isn’t needed is a bricks and mortar store, not when orders take less than a day to receive. What bests me is why anyone bought Staples retail business when they moved to eCommerce.

Staples made some astounding business choices. Signed a 25 year lease on a store, 18 months later built their own building 150 yards away and move store into there.
Tried to sublet the original unit which was against the lease agreement.
Then had to pay for an empty unit for 5 years, they then reopened the original store as an office furniture showroom, huge unit to light and heat, couple of staff.
Which got one or two people wandering in occasionally, realise that the paper or whatever they wanted was in the other shop, Sold about three desks in a year.
Before buying themselves out of the lease for a very large sum.
 
Staples made some astounding business choices. Signed a 25 year lease on a store, 18 months later built their own building 150 yards away and move store into there.
Tried to sublet the original unit which was against the lease agreement.
Then had to pay for an empty unit for 5 years, they then reopened the original store as an office furniture showroom, huge unit to light and heat, couple of staff.
Which got one or two people wandering in occasionally, realise that the paper or whatever they wanted was in the other shop, Sold about three desks in a year.
Before buying themselves out of the lease for a very large sum.
Pales into insignificance compared with the competence of Australian retail managers. Bunnings buying Homebase with the vision of bringing their Aussie style to the UK. Only to find that they were bringing something out of the 80s when DIY warehouses started. Wooolworths investing in 40+ New Masters megastores only to close them within a year.

The Aussie equivalent of Staples, Officeworks, never has what you want.
 
Lots of SMEs use Staples and the like. They don’t consume enough stationary to get a wholesale account and don’t want to hold large inventories. What isn’t needed is a bricks and mortar store, not when orders take less than a day to receive. What bests me is why anyone bought Staples retail business when they moved to eCommerce.
There is a stationary shop in my local (ish) High Street. Not a very large store, but I bet the council still screws them for tax. I have only been in there a few times, for pens, pencils, folders, a hole punch, and so on. It is a medium sized town with a college of further education as well as schools and businesses, and I think they rely on convenience as their USP.
 
Kingfisher are circling the drain.

B&Q owner's boss to go as profits fall

If they do go, I expect that there will be a ready buyer for Screwfix.
Don’t think their circling the drain yet, but they do need some serious restructuring. Not least ditch Castorama and close the European Skrewfix businesses which arr never going to make them money.

The core business is still profitable. The CEO woman hasn’t had the balls to do the necessary
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
Revelations on the Emperor Mong thread about Tesco's complacent attitude to shoplifting suggest that Tesco prices include a bit for 'shrinkage' thereby unavoidably making Tesco less competitive.
 

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