Tesco next down the pan?

It’s hard to get where I live as there’s no hedgehogs. We can get echidna scrotum chips which do give a taste of the old country. The local Coles also sells Heinz British recipe beans for the same reason; us pommies feeling homesick.
Are there enough poms with good manners and taste in your area to make a pickled hedgehog testicle import business a worthwhile endeavour? I'm sure we could crowd fund the start up costs from ARRSErs
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
It’s hard to get where I live as there’s no hedgehogs. We can get echidna scrotum chips which do give a taste of the old country. The local Coles also sells Heinz British recipe beans for the same reason; us pommies feeling homesick.


And probably why QF does a direct LON to PER flight as well? Heard there are quite a few Poms in PER area...and of course, at the moment a LON to MEL/SYD is probably not technically possible...in a couple of years maybe.
 
And probably why QF does a direct LON to PER flight as well? Heard there are quite a few Poms in PER area...and of course, at the moment a LON to MEL/SYD is probably not technically possible...in a couple of years maybe.
QANTAS is saying they'll have a London to Sydney direct route available by 2022.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Yes dear. Is it time for your nap already?
Spoken like a city dweller with no idea how urban and rural dwellers, the majority of the UK population, actually live.
 
Spoken like a city dweller with no idea how urban and rural dwellers, the majority of the UK population, actually live.
No, spoken like someone who knows something of the subject. And you're wrong about where I live as well.

I know, and between you and I this is something that people in my line of work sometimes forget, that data does not drive outcomes. It is the evidence of activity is all. The activity of what you so condescendingly call the majority of the UK population, urban and rural dwellers. The point of data and business analysis is not to change peoples behaviours, but to deliver to businesses insights and understanding of those behaviours in order to better serve them.

The large supermarkets did not rise to dominance by springing into existence in a creationist moment and then tempting in shoppers from the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker. They rose up and expanded into the space created by a change in shoppers expectations and behaviours. This was driven by a number of factors including, but not limited to, a change in family working patterns, increased shopper mobility, changing tastes and demands, domestic refrigeration and food technology.

Village shops, the ones that have survived, adapted to this by changing their focus from offering a little bit of quite a bit to convenience items with the occasional bit of local produce thrown in. They cannot, so do not, compete with the supermarkets for range or price. I accept that there are exceptions to every rule, near me for example is a farm shop complex that does a roaring trade in meat, veg, dairy and high end dried goods. Ironically, it's principle customer base is urban families with high disposable income. People from the village tend to go elsewhere to the supermarkets.

Simply, supermarkets did not put village shops out of business. Customers, or rather the lack of them, did that. Those that have survived did that through adaptation. The supermarkets themselves are now facing an adapt or die moment driven by, amongst other things, changing working patterns, changing customer concerns and priorities, the rise of internet retail, changing demographics etc
 
Simply, supermarkets did not put village shops out of business. Customers, or rather the lack of them, did that. Those that have survived did that through adaptation. The supermarkets themselves are now facing an adapt or die moment driven by, amongst other things, changing working patterns, changing customer concerns and priorities, the rise of internet retail, changing demographics etc

Read again what you have written. That is an logically inconsistent statement. If you're using any kind of inference engine based upon that, you're fceked.

A Tuxer should and must do better. Bet you were a Mandrake user to boot. You definitely wouldn't have been able handle Slackware, bit like an SA80 user trying to upgrade to THAT rifle. M'eh.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
No, spoken like someone who knows something of the subject. And you're wrong about where I live as well.

I know, and between you and I this is something that people in my line of work sometimes forget, that data does not drive outcomes. It is the evidence of activity is all. The activity of what you so condescendingly call the majority of the UK population, urban and rural dwellers. The point of data and business analysis is not to change peoples behaviours, but to deliver to businesses insights and understanding of those behaviours in order to better serve them.

The large supermarkets did not rise to dominance by springing into existence in a creationist moment and then tempting in shoppers from the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker. They rose up and expanded into the space created by a change in shoppers expectations and behaviours. This was driven by a number of factors including, but not limited to, a change in family working patterns, increased shopper mobility, changing tastes and demands, domestic refrigeration and food technology.

Village shops, the ones that have survived, adapted to this by changing their focus from offering a little bit of quite a bit to convenience items with the occasional bit of local produce thrown in. They cannot, so do not, compete with the supermarkets for range or price. I accept that there are exceptions to every rule, near me for example is a farm shop complex that does a roaring trade in meat, veg, dairy and high end dried goods. Ironically, it's principle customer base is urban families with high disposable income. People from the village tend to go elsewhere to the supermarkets.

Simply, supermarkets did not put village shops out of business. Customers, or rather the lack of them, did that. Those that have survived did that through adaptation. The supermarkets themselves are now facing an adapt or die moment driven by, amongst other things, changing working patterns, changing customer concerns and priorities, the rise of internet retail, changing demographics etc
You lost my attention to your argument when you accused me of being condescending about myself.

Does not compute!

Stay in your ivory tower built of statistics. I am with Mark Twain!
 
But if their algorithm indicated that the few people who buy wolf nipple chips also buy seals foreskin tea which has such a margin that they’d make more than selling to lots of otters noses that’s what they’d do.

Different retail sector but Zara can ramp up production of a long skirt that is trending in a certain demographic in Barcelona and push it into a similar demographic in London whilst not doing so in Newcastle because there’s no demand and do it in a week. The algorithms behind modern mass retail defy belief.
The loyalty card, it took a long time for most people to catch on to what they are for. The wife still doesn't understand how they work and why they want your info. They know that your secret passion is snuff and your wife is orange bubble bath and send each of you different vouchers when new products are online.

As to the villagers capacity to travel, that is why we now have home delivery. My son used it a lot when he was in Lincoln (he can't drive), now he is in Edinburgh and has a Tesco and Sainsbury within 150m he does not need it. Co-Op is the village shop in the villages round me and they seem to do ok even if you have a Tesco, M&S, Morrisons, Asda, Lidl, Iceland x3, Farmfoods, Sainsbury and Aldi all within 15mins drive but you get that if you live in a small rural town.
 
Read again what you have written. That is an logically inconsistent statement. If you're using any kind of inference engine based upon that, you're fceked.

A Tuxer should and must do better. Bet you were a Mandrake user to boot. You definitely wouldn't have been able handle Slackware, bit like an SA80 user trying to upgrade to THAT rifle. M'eh.
Hush child, you're embarrassing yourself.

In small words for the hard of understanding. Supermarkets did not put village shops out of business. The customers did when they decided to stop going to the village shop but to the supermarket instead. Because the supermarket sold what they wanted. That is why the village shop went out of business.

Ok now? Or do you want to insert another amusing reference about an obsolete battle rifle?
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Let's all ignore it because, sooner or later, it's mummy will take it off for meal/wash/bed and everything will go back to normal with normal (almost) people having a sensible discussion without the young trying to be supercilious.
 
The loyalty card, it took a long time for most people to catch on to what they are for. The wife still doesn't understand how they work and why they want your info. They know that your secret passion is snuff and your wife is orange bubble bath and send each of you different vouchers when new products are online.

As to the villagers capacity to travel, that is why we now have home delivery. My son used it a lot when he was in Lincoln (he can't drive), now he is in Edinburgh and has a Tesco and Sainsbury within 150m he does not need it. Co-Op is the village shop in the villages round me and they seem to do ok even if you have a Tesco, M&S, Morrisons, Asda, Lidl, Iceland x3, Farmfoods, Sainsbury and Aldi all within 15mins drive but you get that if you live in a small rural town.
Loyalty cards are more complex; operate at a macro level, locking people into shopping only in the provider whilst providing a platform to up and cross sell to customers. Stuffing up one element can be disasterous as Coles in Aus have found out in recent years.

Coles operates a loyalty card called Flybuys, which can be used in other Westfarms outlets including Shell petrol stations and Liquorland bottle shops (you can’t buy booze in the big Aussie supermarkets, which both own off licence chains.

The card gave great cross-outlet discounts; spend in Coles, get cheap booze and cash of fuel. So people became fiercely loyal to Flybuys, doing all their shopping in Coles, buying only Shell fuels. Until they broke the chain.

Since global fuel prices started to rise again, Shell fuel is on average 20 cents more a litre than some other fuels. So a 4c voucher makes no difference. As a result, people go elsewhere for fuel and no longer build up the big cash back deals on their food. So they shop in Aldi, which does sell booze. So they buy their booze at Aldi, not Liquorland.

And so on. Without the macro effect of loyalty, the up selling and cross selling piece is irrelevant.
 
There was near riot in M+S in Hastings are years back.The vultures began circling at about 16:00 awaiting the "reductions team" to come out and price stuff to get rid of it.It soon became obvious that there was nowhere near enough stuff being reduced as the vultures had hoped.
There were tears and tantrums, threats of violence, pushing and shoving........Thankfully I was well out of it.
Good job you were not there in 1066
 

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