Tesco next down the pan?

People may be idiots as far as voting in elections is concerned but they sure as hell aren't idiots when it comes to where they buy their groceries. Hence the remarkable success of Aldi and Lidl.

Your post is very telling though - you insist the old guard of supermarkets have it right and you reveal that you think "people [i.e. the customers] are idiots". Little wonder retail looks like it does.

And to the gent who complained about the taste of the baked beans - the pound shop (not tesco, not Sainsburys etc) does great deals on Heinz's (notably for singlies - 3 small tins for a quid)
I buy Heinz beanz in Lidl. Job jobbed.

Except the day I bought a three pack for a pound and got them home to find they included sausages!!!!
 
People may be idiots as far as voting in elections is concerned but they sure as hell aren't idiots when it comes to where they buy their groceries. Hence the remarkable success of Aldi and Lidl.

Your post is very telling though - you insist the old guard of supermarkets have it right and you reveal that you think "people [i.e. the customers] are idiots". Little wonder retail looks like it does.

And to the gent who complained about the taste of the baked beans - the pound shop (not tesco, not Sainsburys etc) does great deals on Heinz's (notably for singlies - 3 small tins for a quid)
My posts points out the fucking obvious. You aren't saving anything unless you are buying the same products.
Most of the own brands in stores are from the same manufacturers.
For some reason people wouldn't be seen dead buying Tescos own brand cornflakes but are happy with Aldis.
 
Define quality, price and value....:
You will have to ask them about quality, they are the ones saying the quality of aldi own brand is better than Tesco own brand.
As for price, despite the Aldi advert now having small print on the screen stating the price comparison would be different if they compared tesco own brand rather than real brands people still claim to make savings. If I went to a village store and bought all the Happy Shopper products I could claim that the village store is cheaper than Tescos if I only compared certain products.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
As a minor oddity, a couple of times recently I have seen a camera drone for £49.99 in the locked cupboard in my local Aldi. I had no idea drones could be so cheap.
 
You will have to ask them about quality, they are the ones saying the quality of aldi own brand is better than Tesco own brand.
As for price, despite the Aldi advert now having small print on the screen stating the price comparison would be different if they compared tesco own brand rather than real brands people still claim to make savings. If I went to a village store and bought all the Happy Shopper products I could claim that the village store is cheaper than Tescos if I only compared certain products.
I can see where you are coming from and largely agree, but In reality it’s a whole lot more complicated.

As an example, I value my time highly. Time spent in shops is time not spent earning money or enjoying myself. When I go to Aldi I can never get everything I want because they only stock 900 SKUs. So I have to go somewhere else too, which costs me more of that time which is worth more to me than the savings I made by going to Aldi.

And if I slend enough at a major supermarket, I get a discount voucher for fuel which saves me big money given my car isn’t shy of visiting petrol stations. So the perceived savings of going to Aldi have disappeared.

And that’s before I start reading labels and realising that Aldi products are often nothing like the same as the competition.
 
I can see where you are coming from and largely agree, but In reality it’s a whole lot more complicated.

As an example, I value my time highly. Time spent in shops is time not spent earning money or enjoying myself. When I go to Aldi I can never get everything I want because they only stock 900 SKUs. So I have to go somewhere else too, which costs me more of that time which is worth more to me than the savings I made by going to Aldi.

And if I slend enough at a major supermarket, I get a discount voucher for fuel which saves me big money given my car isn’t shy of visiting petrol stations. So the perceived savings of going to Aldi have disappeared.

And that’s before I start reading labels and realising that Aldi products are often nothing like the same as the competition.
The time wasted in major supermarkets isn't what people are saying though.
They are saying the prices are better. Well of course they are because they are comparing different products.
Try home delivery if your time is valuable.
 
The time wasted in major supermarkets isn't what people are saying though.
They are saying the prices are better. Well of course they are because they are comparing different products.
Try home delivery if your time is valuable.
Back to price, quality and value.

Most products that supermarkets sell are commoditised, especially the 900 or so staples that Aldi stock. There’s no discernable quality difference; shoppers routinely can’t identify different brands in blind tests. Plus one persons good quality is another’s poor quality.

So it’s about price and value, which is more complex than just pounds spent.

It will be a bad day for customer choice when retailers who offer a wide range are forced to close by hard discounters who offer a very limited choice.
 
Back to price, quality and value.

Most products that supermarkets sell are commoditised, especially the 900 or so staples that Aldi stock. There’s no discernable quality difference; shoppers routinely can’t identify different brands in blind tests. Plus one persons good quality is another’s poor quality.
Then Tescos own brand is likely to be similar to Aldi own brand.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
You mean Tescos and aldi sell the same shit under their own brand? Strange because I could have sworn someone said how Aldi is better quality.
Many suppliers of branded products also supply 'own label' products. For example, the manufacturer of (say) a well known brand of tomato sauce might also supply product of a similar quality to Aldo and Lidl in packaging specific to those retail chains.

Private label - Wikipedia

I do admire your ability to pontificate on a subject you clearly have very limited knowledge of. Have you considered a career in politics?

Wordsmith
 
Many suppliers of branded products also supply 'own label' products. For example, the manufacturer of (say) a well known brand of tomato sauce might also supply product of a similar quality to Aldo and Lidl in packaging specific to those retail chains.

Private label - Wikipedia

I do admire your ability to pontificate on a subject you clearly have very limited knowledge of. Have you considered a career in politics?

Wordsmith
So Tesco own brand is the same as real brands?
Good of you to admit it.
 
I can see where you are coming from and largely agree, but In reality it’s a whole lot more complicated.

As an example, I value my time highly. Time spent in shops is time not spent earning money or enjoying myself. When I go to Aldi I can never get everything I want because they only stock 900 SKUs. So I have to go somewhere else too, which costs me more of that time which is worth more to me than the savings I made by going to Aldi.
This.

I'm always quite amused by how evangelical people get about supermarkets, it's almost as if they're seeking validation for their choices. In reality people's decisions are based on far more drivers than price alone; convenience, choice, ambience to name a few. Curiously I don't know anyone for whom perceived social cachet is a factor.

This is born out to an extent by the flip side of the Aldi/Lidl market share example. The discounters have certainly taken a significant share of the market from the established players but, interestingly, once a store has been established in a new location that growth stagnates at around the 12% market share mark. In other words, they attract those shoppers for whom price is the major driver and that's it. Others will continue with their choice based on their priorities.
 
Tesco own brand tends to be of a lower quality than branded products. Which is why its cheaper.

Wordsmith
One of my brothers, works for one of the major suppliers and you would be surprised how much is the same shit in a differently labelled can or jar.
 
One of my brothers, works for one of the major suppliers and you would be surprised how much is the same shit in a differently labelled can or jar.
I wouldn't, but then I'm not the one claiming Aldi own brand is superior.
 
Tesco own brand tends to be of a lower quality than branded products. Which is why its cheaper.

Wordsmith
That must explain why product recalls are sometimes for the same type of items in both tesco and aldi :roll:
 
So Tesco's new brand - Jack's

Over here "going to Jack's" just means going to the lav. Can see some weekend headlines already.
 
One of my brothers, works for one of the major suppliers and you would be surprised how much is the same shit in a differently labelled can or jar.
I spent some time a while ago working for a supermarket owned clothing retailer. As per industry standard all the rags are manufactured offshore; Turkey, Portugal, China and India all had the leading factories. Given that most of the manufacturers also produced for the leading high end brands, I was asking why the products were so different in quality.

The factory will produce garments to a spec, usually with the raw materials supplied by the customer; Fabric, thread, buttons, zips, packaging etc. Since the design comes from the customer too, the factory's role is to stitch them together to the design, to a spec (threads per inch, double overlocking on hems - or not, etc) So whilst your Gucci T-shirt may come from the same factory as a George at Asda T-shirt, that's where the similarity ends. Whilst a factory that serves high end and low end customers you'd assume that the workforce skills are common and therefore you'd get a better garment than from a factory that only serves low end customers. But not so. A factory that serves high and low will have segregated workforce where all the best staff will be working on the Prada account, and the less skilled staff will be working on Top Shop account.

It shouldn't have come as a surprise as I started my career working for a large UK retail chemist that had a large contract manufacturing business producing toothpaste, soap, cosmetics etc for the supermarket's own brand labels. Each customer chose their own 'recipe', usually down to a cost. So the own brand toothpastes were often significantly inferior to the branded versions, even though it came from the same factory. It was actually a nightmare to procure small quantities of ingredients, just because customer A wanted a slightly cheaper version. At one point we were holding stocks of 16 different types of cardboard for the boxes.

So the upshot is that the same factory may make pasta sauce for branded and own label customers, but the recipes will be different, even if only slightly. Any factory manager that attempts to pull a fast one by substituting cheaper ingredients is risking getting caught out by the customer's QA dept and thus losing a contract. That's not to say substitution doesn't happen, but it usually by the raw material supplier (contracted by the customer - I.e. the horsemeat scandal) rather than the factory.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top