Tell me this and tell me no more.

You really don't have a clue what your talking about.

Explain to me how my part of the UK may soon be in the ROI?
Oh thats simple, so simple even the most Jaffa orange boyner should be able to grab it.

The EU wants a united Ireland, and by hook or by crook, its going to do everything in its power to help its client state, and thats what the RoI is since the EU made them vote again and again until it gave the right answer, achieve united hood.
 
Oh thats simple, so simple even the most Jaffa orange boyner should be able to grab it.

The EU wants a united Ireland, and by hook or by crook, its going to do everything in its power to help its client state, and thats what the RoI is since the EU made them vote again and again until it gave the right answer, achieve united hood.
You still haven't explained how we'll be ending up in the ROI. The EU's wishes are as relevant as Sinn Feins objectives.. mere pipe dreams.
 
Take of the orange tinted sunglasses. The futures green, they are outbreeding you at a prodigious rate.
Can you show me any evidence that a majority of the population of Northern Ireland would consider voting to unite Ireland under a Dublin government?

I await the answer with baited breath.
 
See - Religion and Fertility in Contemporary Northern Ireland
The evidence in here says that for a 400 women group from each community there would be a difference of one extra Catholic child over their lifetime. I'd hardly call that prodigious.
But he knows everything..It must be true.

48% of Northern Ireland is Protestant. 45% Catholic in the last census.

I'd bet the ground I walk upon that the majority of those 7% saying 'other' are from the so called Protestant community..me for an example.

Yet only 25% of those who are Catholic identify as Irish.

I'll be a British citizen in my homeland for along time yet.
 
Yet only 25% of those who are Catholic identify as Irish.
I could make a joke about the Poles get everywhere, but I suspect the reality is that a lot of Catholics are quite happy with the NHS, an £11,000 no tax band on their earnings and one or two other little perks of being in the UK.
 
See - Religion and Fertility in Contemporary Northern Ireland
The evidence in here says that for a 400 women group from each community there would be a difference of one extra Catholic child over their lifetime. I'd hardly call that prodigious.
The data used in that survey is 10-20 years old (collected 199-2007). Sure since that time church attendance in the Republic has declined by around 5% a year. The Irish Catholic Church is in a mess; can’t recruit priests, reputation in tatters over child sex abuse. It ain’t going to recover; some studies expect church attendance to fall by as much as 70% over the next decade. The same must be happening in NI.

IMHO we are rapidly approaching a point where religion in NI will be nothing more than a label by which lapses and never engaged people identify.

In another generation religion will be largely irrelevant. It will all be about economics. Who provides the best opportunities for prosperity?
 
The data used in that survey is 10-20 years old (collected 199-2007). Sure since that time church attendance in the Republic has declined by around 5% a year. The Irish Catholic Church is in a mess; can’t recruit priests, reputation in tatters over child sex abuse. It ain’t going to recover; some studies expect church attendance to fall by as much as 70% over the next decade. The same must be happening in NI.

IMHO we are rapidly approaching a point where religion in NI will be nothing more than a label by which lapses and never engaged people identify.

In another generation religion will be largely irrelevant. It will all be about economics. Who provides the best opportunities for prosperity?
It's always been about economics for those who aren't Loyalist or Republican
 
We don’t necessarily need access through GB (it’s very much desirable).
You will not be bothered then, that the new dock bridge is going in nicely.
You know, that one those big Irish wagons do not need access through GB, for to get to the EU.
I must have missed the bit on the Irish ports website where they say that they only ever and will ever do routes to the UK.

It's back;

bridge.PNG


Just in case, but..............

Rolos are still made of chocolate.


Ireland's Central Statistics Office released figures on 29 June, which show that in 2017 553,630 loaded Ro-Ro freight containers, on lorries or trailers, were shipped from Ireland to the rest of the world.......................

The vast majority were heading for other ports in the EU. Only a tiny number - 24 - went to ports elsewhere. About 85% of Ireland's total EU freight trade goes via British ports - 475,925 containers last year.
The Irish Freight Transport Association estimates that the final destination of roughly 60% of the 475,925 freight containers shipped to Britain is Britain itself......................

That means the other 40% - roughly 190,000 per year - is destined for elsewhere in the EU, transiting across Britain via ports such as Dover or Hull, or via the Channel Tunnel..........................

.................But to give some idea of the extent to which Ireland relies on the British land bridge, statistics from the Port of Dublin show that last year it sent 31,875 loaded Ro-Ro containers to Belgium and Holland, while it sent 188,902 containers to Holyhead alone.
 
Those big Irish wagons that do not need access through GB, for to get to the EU?
They do not fall in the dock now.
Did you read the article?

553,630 RoRo trucks left Ireland

Of them:
24 went outside the EU
475,925 went to UK ports (85%)

Of the 475,925 an estimated 40% we’re using it as a land bridge to other EU States - that’s 34% of the annual total RoRo figure.

In other words, over 285,000 of those trucks had the UK as their final destination.

You must have missed the bit where it states the largest 2 short sea ferries in the world have just started operating from Dublin and extra capacity on other routes out of Ireland.

Ferries aren’t like train lines, there routes can be changed very quickly.
 
Did you read the article?

553,630 RoRo trucks left Ireland

Of them:
24 went outside the EU
475,925 went to UK ports (85%)

Of the 475,925 an estimated 40% we’re using it as a land bridge to other EU States - that’s 34% of the annual total RoRo figure.

In other words, over 285,000 of those trucks had the UK as their final destination.

You must have missed the bit where it states the largest 2 short sea ferries in the world have just started operating from Dublin and extra capacity on other routes out of Ireland.

Ferries aren’t like train lines, there routes can be changed very quickly.
No they can’t.They have to have berthing facilities, subject to tidal variations which are critical to timings. RoRo differs substantially to container traffic. The longer the Journey by sea, the drivers like as they get time off, but the units may not be available for planned pickups, that will require extra cost to Hauliers who will need extra units. Containers may have to be transhipped more frequently to get to the end destinations. Off set that against reduced wear and tear on our roads, which will benefit us, possible increase in rail freight, which is good. The EU really don’t have a handle on this. Ireland has problem Britain is in the way and the Irish border solution will still not alter that
 
Further to @The above, transiting the EU counts as EU traffic. You have to transit the EU to leave it, unless your’e going to the American side of the pond.We used to handle at least 24 TIR a week from Dartford.
 
No they can’t.They have to have berthing facilities, subject to tidal variations which are critical to timings. RoRo differs substantially to container traffic. The longer the Journey by sea, the drivers like as they get time off, but the units may not be available for planned pickups, that will require extra cost to Hauliers who will need extra units. Containers may have to be transhipped more frequently to get to the end destinations. Off set that against reduced wear and tear on our roads, which will benefit us, possible increase in rail freight, which is good. The EU really don’t have a handle on this. Ireland has problem Britain is in the way and the Irish border solution will still not alter that
So what your trying to tell is that a vessel that currently does Dublin-Holyhead can only ever do Dublin-Holyhead and there is no chance of the line changing it to Dublin-Cherbourg or Rosslare-Cherbourg if that’s what the demand is?

It is longer absolutely, could possibly mean more LoLo traffic maybe. There will be more trailers required etc etc.

But still the UK doesn’t actually get what they are negotiating. They can’t even come up with an acceptable solution themselves.

The outcome is going to be bad for all
 
No I’m telling you you need to find the slots to take the ships in the first place. Demand drives expansion only then do you get investment in the ports. I take it you get the distinction between wharfage, rampage or container handling. Then you have to factor in when the tides allow you in.
The UK has invested in those, but this isn’t about us caving in so much as an understanding that who controls what trade deal shouldn’t alter the principles of current or future Community Transit. This is now a naked power grab by the EU, and the implications will be very far reaching. If we give the EU the means to determine national boundaries, it will be a precedent. We have reached a point where neither side can give in. Harmonising a customs system is relatively easy. But that isn’t the sticking point, patently.
 
No they can’t.They have to have berthing facilities, subject to tidal variations which are critical to timings. RoRo differs substantially to container traffic. The longer the Journey by sea, the drivers like as they get time off, but the units may not be available for planned pickups, that will require extra cost to Hauliers who will need extra units. Containers may have to be transhipped more frequently to get to the end destinations. Off set that against reduced wear and tear on our roads, which will benefit us, possible increase in rail freight, which is good. The EU really don’t have a handle on this. Ireland has problem Britain is in the way and the Irish border solution will still not alter that
exactly ! just before I quit the european work the HSS (Belfast Stranraer)ferries were for sale, the big fly in the ointment was that the specialised bespoke docking facilities had to be sold with them otherwise they were useless.
 
No I’m telling you you need to find the slots to take the ships in the first place. Demand drives expansion only then do you get investment in the ports. I take it you get the distinction between wharfage, rampage or container handling. Then you have to factor in when the tides allow you in.
The UK has invested in those, but this isn’t about us caving in so much as an understanding that who controls what trade deal shouldn’t alter the principles of current or future Community Transit. This is now a naked power grab by the EU, and the implications will be very far reaching. If we give the EU the means to determine national boundaries, it will be a precedent. We have reached a point where neither side can give in. Harmonising a customs system is relatively easy. But that isn’t the sticking point, patently.
You mean like the increasing funding for ports that the EU is talking about?

The is a huge expansion currently going on in Dublin, work has started in Cork and there is already spare capacity in Rosslare.

1/4 million less trucks transiting the UK and you don’t think that there will be less sailings across the English Channel, freeing up slots?!

This is about your future relationship with the EU, not just Ireland.

All this talk of Ireland bullying the UK.... don’t forget the Spanish have a veto on any agreement. Of course there has to be one first
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top