Tell me this and tell me no more.

#1
Now I know I am being daft here but:

What is gained and what is lost, for both sides (UK/Ireland-EU) if we just return to pre-1993 custom controls, (2020 edition?) introduced in 1923, when it became the Republic of Ireland–United Kingdom border.
In other words who is going to be worse off.
An honest question.
 
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Guns

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#4
The issue will be the control of trade from third parties in to the EU and how they wish to manage that. So say a company in the USA wants to import something to German.

Under current regulations they pay an import charge.

If the goods came in to the UK and we have negotiated an import charge less or not at all then they could move the goods across to Ireland where it then is clean and internal goods to Germany.

Bit like money laundering.

Plus the old customs regulations where designed for physical goods so services are ill served. In addition the old rules lack dispute mechnisism that meet international standards and that causes legal issues that would have to be tested in court.

Plus international trade rules have changed and so the old customs rules are, in certain areas, incompatible with out international treaties the UK has signed up to.
 

Guns

ADC
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#5
It is a case of getting it right now for the future that meets the needs of both parties. The old regulations would need to be revised (as I mentioned) to accommodate trade now and in the future so it makes sense to get it done now, correctly, before it costs more later on.
 
#6
So the loss of revenue and thus the policing would be more toward the Ireland-EU camp..
Hence the ones doing the most squealing.
Thank you.
 
#8
What is gained and what is lost, for both sides (UK/Ireland-EU) if we just return to pre-1993 custom controls, (2020 edition?) introduced in 1923, when it became the Republic of Ireland–United Kingdom border.
Amongst other things, the opportunity to negotiate a deal that fits our needs against the changing world of the 21st Century.

Retreating to the past is rarely as comforting as it appears. Things were bad then, too, just in different ways.
 

Guns

ADC
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Book Reviewer
#9
So the loss of revenue and thus the policing would be more toward the Ireland-EU camp..
Hence the ones doing the most squealing.
Thank you.
I'm sure the UK exporters to the EU would love to have to face delay and cost...........

When there is a line of trucks at the boarder (UK side) then we shall see if people are so happy.

The spoilt child act is fine but not in international trade. You have to get these things correct because the cost of not is huge.

Leaving the EU as an idea is fine, but the practice of actually doing it needs to be well thought out and planned for. But seeing as the BREXIT crowd only had few months to cobble stuff together I get they are struggling......
 

overopensights

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Book Reviewer
#10
Which would change again when ireland leaves the EU.
In years to come I can't see Ireland leaving the EU, the 'man in the street' is really quite full of it, you can see examples of EU spending especially in and about Dublin. An example is the 'two way' fully paved and with kerbs , white lined cycle track throughout Dublin city, I didn't see a single cyclist using it, but plenty of walkers along its route.
One national newspaper discussing Brexit quoted , 'As we Irish already know, the British have always been awkward.'
 
#11
Irish politicians are too greedy and Irish civil servants are to obtuse to see that Ireland would be better off, in the long run out of the EU. About the only sector of society there that can see that is the coastal fishing community. Since most of Northern Ireland voted to stay in Europe,and presumably most of ROI want to stay suckling the Brussels tit. It would be hilarious if the DUP did what the IRA couldn't do through thirty years of murder ,mayhem and madness,and delivered a reunified Ireland. Plus UK ,PLC relieved of a huge non producing parasite. (NI. Not Arlene Foster :rolleyes:)
 
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#12
Irish politicians are too greedy and Irish civil servants are to obtuse to see that Ireland would be better off, in the long run out of the EU. About the only sector of society there that can see that is the coastal fishing community. Since most of Northern Ireland voted to stay in Europe,and presumably most of ROI want to stay suckling the Brussels tit. It would be hilarious if the DUP did what the IRA couldn't do through thirty years of murder ,mayhem and madness,and delivered a reunified Ireland. Plus UK ,PLC relieved of a huge non producing parasite.
Couldn’t agree more if I wanted to. The problem with a parasite though is it never wants to let go of the host ( because its speshul you see)
 
#13
In years to come I can't see Ireland leaving the EU, the 'man in the street' is really quite full of it, you can see examples of EU spending especially in and about Dublin. An example is the 'two way' fully paved and with kerbs , white lined cycle track throughout Dublin city, I didn't see a single cyclist using it, but plenty of walkers along its route.
One national newspaper discussing Brexit quoted , 'As we Irish already know, the British have always been awkward.'
It's not EU spending. It's their own money given back to them.
 
#14
I'm sure the UK exporters to the EU would love to have to face delay and cost..........
When there is a line of trucks at the boarder (UK side) then we shall see if people are so happy.
Ireland and the UK want a drive through plan.
UK lower import tariffs, more trade and cheap stuff going south less tax for EU.
Close the border to stop that.

Would not the channel ports serve us better, for the EU.
The Irish use it, the Liverpool - Dublin route as seen a fair freight growth, closer to the channel tunnel than Scotland - Northern Ireland.
This I know from the fact of a bridge being out for replacement, going on six months worth.

The spoilt child act is fine but not in international trade. You have to get these things correct because the cost of not is huge.
The EU is using Ireland as a big stick. Gibraltar/Spain will be next.

What would be coming north, that we do not now have, to force the UK the close the border.
That dreaded refugee and migrant hordes, eu or worldwide.
What of the Common Travel Area?
Would Ireland suffer being opted into the Schengen and be turned into one large Calais Jungle
 
#15
I'm sure the EU exporters to the uK would love to have to face delay and cost...........

When there is a line of trucks at the boarder (EU side) then we shall see if people are so happy.

The spoilt child act is fine but not in international trade. You have to get these things correct because the cost of not as huge as it’s being made out to be.
.
Fixed that for you.

Interestingly, Switzerland and Norway aren’t in the customs union. I’ve never seen a big queue of trucks coming out of Switzerland.

I did see a big queue of lorry’s in Norway going to Denmark, but they were queuing to get on the ferry.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#16
Fixed that for you.

Interestingly, Switzerland and Norway aren’t in the customs union. I’ve never seen a big queue of trucks coming out of Switzerland.

I did see a big queue of lorry’s in Norway going to Denmark, but they were queuing to get on the ferry.
The import of trucks of goods from the Ukraine, requires only a manifest and a 'Bill of Lading' in 12 years there has never been a single customs problem, and with no delays. I often chat with the drivers. They enter the EU on the Continent, they report no problems there either.
 
#17
The import of trucks of goods from the Ukraine, requires only a manifest and a 'Bill of Lading' in 12 years there has never been a single customs problem, and with no delays. I often chat with the drivers. They enter the EU on the Continent, they report no problems there either.
Is the Ukraine in the EU?

It doesn’t appear to be in the customs union either.

European Union Customs Union - Wikipedia

Neither is the Isle of Man,Jersey,Guernsey m, Gibraltar and a host of other places.
 
#18
Irish politicians are too greedy and Irish civil servants are to obtuse to see that Ireland would be better off, in the long run out of the EU. About the only sector of society there that can see that is the coastal fishing community. Since most of Northern Ireland voted to stay in Europe,and presumably most of ROI want to stay suckling the Brussels tit. It would be hilarious if the DUP did what the IRA couldn't do through thirty years of murder ,mayhem and madness,and delivered a reunified Ireland. Plus UK ,PLC relieved of a huge non producing parasite. (NI. Not Arlene Foster :rolleyes:)
This has been getting spouted since the Brexit vote over here (UNITED IRELAND) Blah Blah.
One question nobody can seem to answer what do they do with The unionist/loyalist people of this country?.
I suspect that the Irish Defence force would have to lunch a major recruiting drive for there own upcoming Op Banner.
Or do the shinners play another long game and wait until the old and bold die off and by that time they will have out breed us.
Or will money talk and when it came to the crunch would they bottle it thanks to the generous state benefits they receive from the British state.
 
#19
In years to come I can't see Ireland leaving the EU, the 'man in the street' is really quite full of it, you can see examples of EU spending of UK taxpayers' money being mispent especially in and about Dublin. An example is the 'two way' fully paved and with kerbs , white lined cycle track throughout Dublin city, I didn't see a single cyclist using it, but plenty of walkers along its route.
One national newspaper discussing Brexit quoted , 'As we Irish already know, the British have always been fceking easy marks to get money out of.'

Fixed for you.
 
#20
The whole concept of import duties is an anachronism, used to protect outdated and unproductive industries, which thrive in the EU due to such practices.

GATT and then the WTO took it down to 4% nearly 20 years ago, before protectionist policies took it back up to an average of 9% today. Got to protect those inefficient French farmers and German car makers.....

And that protection is at the cost of the average working man or woman, who pays above manufacturing cost for inefficient production of goods.

And in those +/- 20 years since WTO agreements were signed world trade has quadrupled to $19 trillion a year.

But both the EU and the UK want to tax you on imported goods, despite accepting what economists had been saying for over 40 years, that such taxes are unfair and unproductive.

The EU goes one step further - free trade within itself, but tariffs on imported goods! I assume everyone can see how insane that is........

And now they demand tariff borders across Ireland - to protect inefficient French farmers and German car makers......
 

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