Teachers pay

#1
Have they really got anything to winge about?

They're generally better paid and have more time off than most so is the real reason (Pain in the arse kids) a good enough one to start throwing money at them or should they suffer the same fate as The Old Bill and get told to feck off back to work!?!
 
#3
In all fairness its not always a lack of guts. I think it may be a lack of support from the western world to Roger Moore Style Judo Chop Unruly kids.
 
#4
I'd agree that they should (like all public servants) get a pay rise, but I'm a baby killing imperialist war monger who shouldn't be allowed to tell kids what I do for a living so personally I hope the NUT get fuck all.
 
#5
Unbelievable!I've just watched the reports on the news about the teachers strike.There was one lunatic who has only been a teacher for 12 months and is complaining that she only gets £23000 a year!I'm sure a Tom in Afghanistan would be chuffed to fcuk with 23 fcuking grand!
 
#6
jimmys_best_mate said:
I'd agree that they should (like all public servants) get a pay rise, but I'm a baby killing imperialist war monger who shouldn't be allowed to tell kids what I do for a living so personally I hope the NUT get fuck all.
Exactly what I said to a member of the NUT thismorning! :D

I then reminded her that it was those she voted out of schools who protected her rights to go on strike.

Her Reply

"Ahhh well but, errr" - <Silence>
 
#7
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
 

Trans-sane

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Fairs fair it is a tough job.

For me it was a tough job cos of all the liberal leftie twats that made my shit hang sideways. The kids I could deal with just fine. The constant office politics, back biting, meaningless paperwork IN FCUKING QUADRUPLICATE did mu nut in.

And getting bad reviews from my nominal boss who could control the kids half as well as me and knew the subject less well than my ccok cheese. Hence the reason I have applied for a green suit and a place at the ocifer factory.
 
#10
OK Guys, let's get this in to perspective shall we?
It may seem like thirteen weeks holiday, but it most definitely is not; while the little darlings are out of school, causing havoc in the neighbgourhood, teachers are doing lesson plans and organizing classrooms for the next term.
On top of that, their day is not the same as the pupils, they are there before the kids come in and long after they have gone home.
It does not end there, they come home and start marking classwork, organising activities, and answering complaints from idiot parents who seem to think their responsibility for their kids ends at the school gates.
I guess, by now, you might have figured I am involved with a member of the teaching profession; my wife has been one for over thirty years, but if you think I am biased, just remember I was armed forces, and my son still is, and has done a tour in Afghan.
What I am trying to point out is, that whatever part of Government service you are in, you are well down the bottom of the breadline, unless you work in Whitehall.
Right, I will now get off my soapbox.
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
Yeah, its all very well for you lot, but did I get any counselling when I was falsely accused of blowing up the science block and expelled? With no forensic evidence?

Four eyed lying twunts. Make them work for bus fares and bowls of rice.

Apart from Miss Wakefield. Who introduced me to French.

unf
 
#12
STABEX said:
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
That's quite funny! I work in the real world, earn significantly more than that with good holidays, a great pension, company car expenses etc, I couldn't give a toss about the threat of redundancy because I will just walk into another similar job tomorrow. After 25 years in the RN, and significant time spent qualifying to be a Maths teacher I decided I couldn't actually afford to teach and redirected my skills and qualifications; industry is paying so much more for so much less in terms of personal commitment.

It's probably worth remembering that the poor sods who put up with your little angels in an attempt to educate them are graduates with real job prospects in the "real" world, they choose to teach because they like teaching. If you want to retain good people in this sector best start paying them good wages or people like me are going to use every trick in the book to buy their skills! Consulting in education pays c£350 a day the same as any other branch of the industry.

That being said this has been building for a long time, it's a shame action wasn't taken before. The current leading and guiding members of the NUT are all left wing nut jobs who could lose public support in a single press interview given half a chance. Just about everyone in the public sector is suffering making teachers appear to be a little selfish throwing their problems above everyone else.....damn bad timing or politically motivated nonsense?
 
#13
I used to be like most people on here with the views on teachers but my misses recently qualified as one. I can tell you for certain that they don't start at 9 am and finish at 3.30pm, she is out of the house before me in the morning and back from work much later than me, roughly 2hrs after and she works closer to our home than me. Once she is home she is doing lesson plans, marking and making things up for displays for her class, she usually gets finished by about 8.30 / 9pm. When it comes to holidays, her school teachers have to work most of them, she gets around 30 days just like the rest of us.

She didnt strike and i dont agree with striking because doing it gets F*ck all results apart from making them look like spongers but i can see where they are coming from, when all is said and done they have just been shafted with a pay deal that is about 2.5% below inflation for the next 3 yrs, so in effect, a pay cut.

I still think the NUT are c*nts though!!
 
#14
tramp_on_chips said:
I used to be like most people on here with the views on teachers but my misses recently qualified as one. I can tell you for certain that they don't start at 9 am and finish at 3.30pm, she is out of the house before me in the morning and back from work much later than me, roughly 2hrs after and she works closer to our home than me. Once she is home she is doing lesson plans, marking and making things up for displays for her class, she usually gets finished by about 8.30 / 9pm. When it comes to holidays, her school teachers have to work most of them, she gets around 30 days just like the rest of us.

She didnt strike and i dont agree with striking because doing it gets F*ck all results apart from making them look like spongers but i can see where they are coming from, when all is said and done they have just been shafted with a pay deal that is about 2.5% below inflation for the next 3 yrs, so in effect, a pay cut.

I still think the NUT are c*nts though!!
Private business payrises are generally 2.5 - 3 % so they should think themselves lucky. I have very little support for teachers given the lack of support in this country for engineers. It's generally forgotten that they are a graduate profession, but they get sod all for it, unlike teachers.
 
#15
STABEX said:
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
My bold, no they don't, nobody does unless you work for a mortgage lender.

Still don't think they've a justification to strike though, they haven't done badly out of the public sector pay round.
 
#16
STABEX said:
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
The best paid part-time job in the world, for sure!

Seriously, the problem is that most have been to school, and, therefore, think they know about teaching. As others point out, what goes on between 8.45am & 3.30pm is only half the job - typically I work a 60 hour week, and it's not unusual to do far more.

As for all the "real world" stuff - schools are microcosms of society, and in my 23 years in the job I've had to deal with just about everything - good & very bad - that can happen in Britain: eg once taught a teenager who murdered his aunt! Rape, incest, fraud, drug use & dealing, violence/ mayhem in various forms...etc. You name it - it happens at some time or other in schools the length & breadth of our fair isles. More commonly, the average teacher deals frequently with the everyday crises/ unhappinesses of the human condition (serious illness, family problems, bereavement/ grief, mental health problems...), and it can be very stressful, esp if combined with the general loutishness of far too many "yoof".

I have been threatened & physically attacked by parents & pupils - fortunately very rarely, but it does happen, and the threat of legal action is a commonplace experience - increasingly!

I don't whinge - on the whole, teaching is a great job, affording many opportunities to pursue my interests/ enthusiasms, and yes, the holidays are one of the attractions; although you never, in my experience, spend more than half of those 13 weeks doing no work. For example, this Summer I'll be passing at least 3 weeks reading up on a new A level course I've never taught before, plus there'll be all the usual post GCSE & A level results "pupil crises" to deal with - advising/ supporting pupils & parents, sweet talking uni admissions tutors on their behalf etc..

Am now fortunate to work in a very good school - the overwhelming majority of parents & pupils are great, and general conditions/ renumeration etc are reasonable. By way of comparison, I note, that as a graduate (1st class hons) with 2 Masters degrees, who has substantial "management responsibilities", I earn a bit more than a WO1, but significantly less than a lot of "passed over" Majors, some of whom seem to do remarkably little for their £45k+ salaries. I made my choices - if big money had been my concern I'd have stayed with the Law & specialised in commercial litigation: unbelievably tedious & soul decaying, but very lucrative!

We should not, however, forget that for many teachers - esp in large urban areas - the job is often incredibly soul destroying; they're dealing with most of society's ills in a very "in your face" way, and find themselves blamed by all and sundry for every dysfunctional little sociopath who fails to "achieve" in school. The rates of pay for young teachers may seem attractive to some, but the "progression" is not great by comparison with what may be earned elsewhere by comparable graduates, and if you're single & living in London/ the South East a lot really do struggle to get by, which is why there's a chronic shortage of decent heads/ deputies in the Big Smoke.

Don't agree with this strike, and yes the NUT can be an embarrassment, but if it's all such a breeze it does seem strange that so few maths, science, languages, and even English & theology/ divinty graduates choose to opt for such a feather bedded occupation. Having spent a couple of years working in the "real world" before entering teaching, I've concluded that teaching is more than "real" enough. It's been my experience that many who enter teaching from "The Real World" with a "Christ Come To Cleanse The Temple" mentality often come badly unstuck when faced with a class of recalcitrant 16 year olds last lesson on a Friday!
 
#17
Wessex_Man said:
STABEX said:
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
The best paid part-time job in the world, for sure!...

It's been my experience that many who enter teaching from "The Real World" with a "Christ Come To Cleanse The Temple" mentality often come badly unstuck when faced with a class of recalcitrant 16 year olds last lesson on a Friday!
Snipped for brevity.

Interesting post Wessex_Man. Good to hear from an inside perspective.
 
#18
Wessex_Man said:
STABEX said:
Teachers really need to get real. They average £30,00 to £34,000 after 6 years, a gold plated pension, and as long as they keep their nose clean a job for life - with early retirement, and lets not even mention the holidays.

Don't they also get cheap mortgages as they are key workers, as well?

They knew what they were getting (ie a bloody good deal) before they went into the profession, and shouldn't start whingeing about it. If they don't like it, they should try and get a job in the real world where shiftwork, threat of redundancy and small pensions are the norm.

Rant over.
The best paid part-time job in the world, for sure!

Seriously, the problem is that most have been to school, and, therefore, think they know about teaching. As others point out, what goes on between 8.45am & 3.30pm is only half the job - typically I work a 60 hour week, and it's not unusual to do far more.

As for all the "real world" stuff - schools are microcosms of society, and in my 23 years in the job I've had to deal with just about everything - good & very bad - that can happen in Britain: eg once taught a teenager who murdered his aunt! Rape, incest, fraud, drug use & dealing, violence/ mayhem in various forms...etc. You name it - it happens at some time or other in schools the length & breadth of our fair isles. More commonly, the average teacher deals frequently with the everyday crises/ unhappinesses of the human condition (serious illness, family problems, bereavement/ grief, mental health problems...), and it can be very stressful, esp if combined with the general loutishness of far too many "yoof".

I have been threatened & physically attacked by parents & pupils - fortunately very rarely, but it does happen, and the threat of legal action is a commonplace experience - increasingly!

I don't whinge - on the whole, teaching is a great job, affording many opportunities to pursue my interests/ enthusiasms, and yes, the holidays are one of the attractions; although you never, in my experience, spend more than half of those 13 weeks doing no work. For example, this Summer I'll be passing at least 3 weeks reading up on a new A level course I've never taught before, plus there'll be all the usual post GCSE & A level results "pupil crises" to deal with - advising/ supporting pupils & parents, sweet talking uni admissions tutors on their behalf etc..

Am now fortunate to work in a very good school - the overwhelming majority of parents & pupils are great, and general conditions/ renumeration etc are reasonable. By way of comparison, I note, that as a graduate (1st class hons) with 2 Masters degrees, who has substantial "management responsibilities", I earn a bit more than a WO1, but significantly less than a lot of "passed over" Majors, some of whom seem to do remarkably little for their £45k+ salaries. I made my choices - if big money had been my concern I'd have stayed with the Law & specialised in commercial litigation: unbelievably tedious & soul decaying, but very lucrative!

We should not, however, forget that for many teachers - esp in large urban areas - the job is often incredibly soul destroying; they're dealing with most of society's ills in a very "in your face" way, and find themselves blamed by all and sundry for every dysfunctional little sociopath who fails to "achieve" in school. The rates of pay for young teachers may seem attractive to some, but the "progression" is not great by comparison with what may be earned elsewhere by comparable graduates, and if you're single & living in London/ the South East a lot really do struggle to get by, which is why there's a chronic shortage of decent heads/ deputies in the Big Smoke.

Don't agree with this strike, and yes the NUT can be an embarrassment, but if it's all such a breeze it does seem strange that so few maths, science, languages, and even English & theology/ divinty graduates choose to opt for such a feather bedded occupation. Having spent a couple of years working in the "real world" before entering teaching, I've concluded that teaching is more than "real" enough. It's been my experience that many who enter teaching from "The Real World" with a "Christ Come To Cleanse The Temple" mentality often come badly unstuck when faced with a class of recalcitrant 16 year olds last lesson on a Friday!
Well said that man! Knocking teachers is an easy target, and a lot of them make it even easier!

I'm pretty damn sure if HM Armed Forces were to get a less than the rise of inflation pay rise (i.e. they effectivly end up with LESS for the same job) there'd be outrage off the outrage monitor on here!

We need more teachers, and better teachers or would my fellow Arssers like to build more prisons and see more economic migration to this country for low to middle paid jobs because we're producing Non-Educational Diliquents to who the army used to be the refuge (thankfully no longer!) from having to get a job in the real world for 22 years?
 
#19
Notice how the Scottish teachers aren't on strike. Do an MEd and get 42k without leaving the classroom - and the money for drawing up timetables and writing attendance letters is well tasty. Nice school in East Dunbartonshire or East Renfrewshire and you're sorted. What has the taxpayer got from this - fanny adams.

One of my pals has recently got a job as a Principal Teacher (ie first promotion - still teaches); top of the scale for that (ie what he will get in a few years) - £48,120.
 
#20
Mrs Baiter is a teacher, although refused to strike yesterday for a variety of resons.

When she returned to work following 6 years off raising our little baiters the first thing that struck her was the very low standards that the younger teachers attained.

Unfortunately (and this is only an opinion I have picked up from her) newly qualified teachers have not been adequately prepared to teach a class and have also had all normal methods of instilling discipline taken away from them.

Apparently you can't even make a kid stand in the corner because it might make them feel stupid.

While I think teachers earn a fair living from their work and have probably been awarded a de facto pay cut in this round - tough sh1t - the same has happened to most of us. Teaching is not only a profession but is meant to be a vocation. Yes there are injustices and yes it can be a tough way to earn a crust but this is all known stuff - if any teacher was surprised by the pay and condidtions when they qualified then they must have been living inside a sealed box for the last X years
 

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