Tarantinos "Inglourious Basterds"

#1
Unbelievable and beyond measure. This was so much better than I expected. Easily his best since Pulp Fiction. I just can't wait to see it again.


Tarantino mentioned, in an interview with Roger Ebert, that he did not let Christopher Waltz (as Colonel Landa) rehearse with any of the actors because he wanted Waltz to surprise his co-stars. " I wanted to keep them nervous and anxious about Landa. So I didn't want them to know what Landa would do until we were doing the later scenes." That decision made the other actors on edge.

At that scene with the Nazi and baseball club Eli Roth looks like loose Samson from the Bible. While Col. Landa treats him with much "Aryan" contempt. I like it that Tarntino choose Jewish and German actors for their parts (great mistake in Brian Singer's Valkyrie. British character actors as Nazi officers is so outdated). Only this way he could get out of his actors the most they can offer. You can feel that for the actors it means more than comic film. That scene in the field, with classic Morricone piece in the background (The Big Gundown), looks awesome. Great homage for Spaghetti Westerns. Eli Roth looks so tense as if he personally avenging historical moment. You can call it ahistorical, fantasy revenge and revesionist but it rings very true psychologically. Unresolved collective trauma.

Watch Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds" highlight (the baseball club scene), homage for the classic 1966 Italian western ''The Big Gundown'' aka ''La Resa dei conti''


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46-6r_e2VIU
 
#2
Does it have all the hallmarks of "classic" Tarantino?

- Shameless exaggeration of the key elements of whatever genre he's "doing" this time. But that's okay because it's homage, apparently.
- Long, tedious conversations about nothing: The kind you can experience firsthand with a 12 pack of beer in your mate's living room.
- Offbeat soundtrack to emphasise how "cool" the director is.
- Stupidly cartoonish violence.
- An unsatisfying ending.

Can you tell that I love Tarantino?
 
#6
Would like to know how Germans react to the film, mainly the last scene - the blood tatoo. Either it can alienate them or served its message much better than the mawkish Schindler's List.

Sure the Jew loving and German hating got old by the end, but the film hardly took itself seriously. Perhaps what has people riled up is the fact that every german soldier depicted in the film is a nazi, in fact every German is depicted as a Nazi.
 
#7
Stein said:
Would like to know how Germans react to the film, mainly the last scene - the blood tatoo. Either it can alienate them or served its message much better than the mawkish Schindler's List.

Sure the Jew loving and German hating got old by the end, but the film hardly took itself seriously. Perhaps what has people riled up is the fact that every german soldier depicted in the film is a nazi, in fact every German is depicted as a Nazi.
According to my missus (a boxhead) it's going down a storm over there.
 
#8
Watching Colonel Landa on that scene, calmly endeavored to show bravery, I was reminded by the words of hangman John C. Woods at the Nuremberg trials


From a 'Stars and Stripes' interview with Master-Sergeant John C. Woods, the Nuremberg Executioner (1946) :

"I hanged these ten Nazis in Nuremberg and I am proud of it; I did a good job. Everything went A1. I have...never been at an execution which went better. I am only sorry that that fellow Göring escaped me; I'd have been at my best with him. No, I wasn't nervous. I haven't got any nerves. You can't afford nerves in my job. But this Nuremberg job was just what I wanted. I wanted this job so terribly that I stayed here a bit longer, though I could have gone home earlier. But I'll say one thing about these Nazis. They died like brave men. Only one of them showed signs of weakness. As Frick climbed the thirteen steps to the gallows, one of his legs seemed to fail and the guard had to hold him up. They were all haughty. One could see how they hated us. The old Jew-baiter Streicher looked at me as he said: 'One day the Bolshevists will hang you.' I looked him back straight in the eye. They couldn't ruffle me. There's not much to say about the executions themselves. They went off...like all other routine executions. Ten men in 103 minutes. That's quick work. Only one of them moved after he fell. He groaned for a bit but not for long. Another, I think it was Sauckel, started to shout 'Heil Hitler' after I had put the hood over his head. I stopped that - with the rope. I used a new rope and a new hood for each man. I put the noose round myself and attached each rope myself to make sure nothing went wrong. The ropes and hoods were burnt with the bodies so that there was nothing left for the souvenir-hunters....What do I think of the gallows job? Someone has to do it after all...But I'm glad the Nuremberg affair is over. It was a strain. I had never seen any of the condemned men before they came through the door of the execution chamber...they gave their names as they came to the scaffold...It is difficult to remember exactly what each one did and said. To hang ten people one after the other it has to go fairly quick, you know. And what I had in my hand was a rope, not a notebook."
 
#9
Stein said:
Would like to know how Germans react to the film, mainly the last scene - the blood tatoo. Either it can alienate them or served its message much better than the mawkish Schindler's List.

Sure the Jew loving and German hating got old by the end, but the film hardly took itself seriously. Perhaps what has people riled up is the fact that every german soldier depicted in the film is a nazi, in fact every German is depicted as a Nazi.
It was all the rage back then.
 
#11
Thought it was rather good. Brad Pitt in particular is hilarious. Came over as a comic book more than a filum in many ways. I suppose you have to like Tarantino though, as it is littered with clichés. I would go and watch it again though, as there is quite a lot you can miss. Agreed its his best since Pulp Fiction.
 
#12
Christopher Waltz did deserve his best actor award for his portrayal of Colonel Landa though. But knowing how things run in Hollywood I doubt he will win the Oscar as he did in Cannes. Most probably the winner will be Morgan Freeman (as Nelson Mandela) in a Clint Eastwood's film "Invictus" to be scheduled in Dec. 11. Remember Oscars 2009...Sean Penn ("you commi homo-living sons of guns") and Mickey Rourke...
 
#14
Stein said:
Christopher Waltz did deserve his best actor award for his portrayal of Colonel Landa though. But knowing how things run in Hollywood I doubt he will win the Oscar as he did in Cannes. Most probably the winner will be Morgan Freeman (as Nelson Mandela) in a Clint Eastwood's film "Invictus" to be scheduled in Dec. 11. Remember Oscars 2009...Sean Penn ("you commi homo-living sons of guns") and Mickey Rourke...
Lieber Stein,

seh's mir nach, aber nach deinem Englisch zu urteilen, bist du ein Boxheed. Es würde mich echt interessieren, wie der Streifen, der ja die Deutschen keineswegs so zu sagen "ins rechte Licht rückt", insgesamt in deiner Heimat aufgenommen worden ist. Mit Jubel? Mit Trauer? Mit Hinblick auf Verständnis?

Nenn mich neugierig wenn's passt, aber es interessiert mich nun mal.

MsG
 
#15
I thought this was a great film - as long as you don't try to take it too serious - I think Tarantino pulled off his attempt at mixing Western & War together pretty well.

I also think the first scene is probably up there with one of the best openings of all time.
 
#17
Bugsy said:
Stein said:
Christopher Waltz did deserve his best actor award for his portrayal of Colonel Landa though. But knowing how things run in Hollywood I doubt he will win the Oscar as he did in Cannes. Most probably the winner will be Morgan Freeman (as Nelson Mandela) in a Clint Eastwood's film "Invictus" to be scheduled in Dec. 11. Remember Oscars 2009...Sean Penn ("you commi homo-living sons of guns") and Mickey Rourke...
Lieber Stein,

seh's mir nach, aber nach deinem Englisch zu urteilen, bist du ein Boxheed. Es würde mich echt interessieren, wie der Streifen, der ja die Deutschen keineswegs so zu sagen "ins rechte Licht rückt", insgesamt in deiner Heimat aufgenommen worden ist. Mit Jubel? Mit Trauer? Mit Hinblick auf Verständnis?

Nenn mich neugierig wenn's passt, aber es interessiert mich nun mal.

MsG
Try Karten Kopf for boxhead.

Otherwise, yep, I agree.

Brad Pitt was superb.

But, for me, Christoph Waltz stole the show. His performance was absolutely outstanding.
 
#18
Stein said:
amazing__lobster said:
I also think the first scene is probably up there with one of the best openings of all time.
First scene was the farm scene, what was so outstanding there? :?
I thought it was a great scene - intelligent, well acted, good dialogue, and pretty intense - it was also a good introduction to the Jew Hunter guy who I think was one of the best actors/characters in the film.

I thought the scene with the Bear Jew in the trench was good, but I don't think it was as good as the first scene.
 
#19
Mr_Creosote said:
Try Karten Kopf for boxhead.
Ich glaube die gängige Übersetzung/sprachliche Übertragung lautet: "Kistenköppe", oder "Chistenchöppe" uuf "Schwiitzerdüutsch".

Allfällinge Berichtigungen werden gerne entgegegenommen und anerkannt.

MsG
 
#20
I watched the original 1977 version at the weekend. It's not bad if you consider that it's over 30 years old (naff special effects, comic moustaches and silly haircuts).
 
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