Tales of a Colonial Policeman

Karamoja

Old-Salt
The PWD (Public Wreckers Works Department) before Independence would be permanently busy grading, laying and rolling the main roads; every few miles you had to overtake a Chokkie-Grader (well, that's what we called them). Laterite, however, doesn't wear the rains well at all; all gone by the dry season. Many years later in Sudan, I saw the cheap answer; oil, straight from the well, which glued the surface very nicely. The Greens would have loved it.
Here's a photo of a Ugandan PWD grader :-

PWD road building 4.jpg
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
That's music I enjoy, thanks for that
Scope Lekkerwear for music, films and clothes:
The prices are in Canadian dollars and I think they've got 25% off the prices until 15 OCT.
 

Karamoja

Old-Salt
.......with shade thing above the windscreen.
That quote brought back memories. My father had a Rover 90 but it couldn't cope with dirt roads during the rains, so he also bought a Vanguard ( I think) which had one fitted. This was better but still ground to a halt especially in the thick black cotton soil of Uganda, so he ended up buying a Landy as well which also used to get stuck. I reckon the stuff would defeat a Chieftain.

Here's photo of the Vanguard ( I think) completely immobile in cotton soil:-

dad's vanguard stuck in cotton soil.jpg



As an aside, I don't remember seeing the shade thingies in Zim.
 

Awol

LE
That quote brought back memories. My father had a Rover 90 but it couldn't cope with dirt roads during the rains, so he also bought a Vanguard ( I think) which had one fitted. This was better but still ground to a halt especially in the thick black cotton soil of Uganda, so he ended up buying a Landy as well which also used to get stuck. I reckon the stuff would defeat a Chieftain.

Here's photo of the Vanguard ( I think) completely immobile in cotton soil:-

View attachment 421590


As an aside, I don't remember seeing the shade thingies in Zim.
Has that got a wheel missing?

(Lovely car).
 
That quote brought back memories. My father had a Rover 90 but it couldn't cope with dirt roads during the rains, so he also bought a Vanguard ( I think) which had one fitted. This was better but still ground to a halt especially in the thick black cotton soil of Uganda, so he ended up buying a Landy as well which also used to get stuck. I reckon the stuff would defeat a Chieftain.

Here's photo of the Vanguard ( I think) completely immobile in cotton soil:-

View attachment 421590


As an aside, I don't remember seeing the shade thingies in Zim.
Your family were clearly upper-echelon saloon-car types. Mine had a Standard van (dad thought it more useful). Brother and I would sit on the bonnet, holding on to the ornament, as it chugged up the hill to home in the Usambaras.
Clipboard01.jpg


You only had to mention 'black-cotton' for faces to twist into deep scowls.
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
Cold Case Hammarskjöld 2019



Link below - follow on screen instructions to download


Viewed on Sunday - def worth a watch for those interested in that period.
The then Federal Aviation people did a very extensive investigation of the wreckage and came to the conclusion that the 'plane had not been shot down by the Katangese Fouga fighter. Norman Kenward a pro photographer from Mufulira had a tip and hastened to the scene and took many pix of the wreckage and the scene. it was obvious to see how the plane had. at a very flat angle, entered the forest and ploughed into floor. The only ammunition found were pistol calibre 8mm and Sgt Julian's snub 38 Spl that had cooked off in the heat. The Svenskas were bound and determined to pin the blame on the RRAF and would not, could not, accept that a UN pilot would not reset altimeter to N Rhodesia Elevation and those dastardly white racists did it, for sure. Although Sgt Julian lived for a few days after being found, there was no talk of being forced down or being attacked, thereby destroying a theory.
 
Cold Case Hammarskjöld 2019



Link below - follow on screen instructions to download


Viewed on Sunday - def worth a watch for those interested in that period.

I suggest you look at my post 233 on this thread which explains fully the reason for the crash, despite all the revisionist B/S trying to blame the "nasty racist colonialist WHITE men". I'm reposting it here ..
23 Jul 2018


A bit later in my time at Chingola on the 18th September I and several others on my station were sent to search in the bush to the East & S. East of Chingola to see if we could spot any sign of the plane carrying Dag Hammarskjöld, the UN Secretary General which had gone missing on a flight from Leopoldville in the Congo to Ndola about 90 miles South of Chingola. Parties from every Police Station in that area were sent to search.
This is a post I did earlier in response to claims that it was shot down by either Katangese or Rhodesian Aircraft.


Interesting to see the claim that his plane was shot down by a Katangese jet fighter fighter. This is dubious to say the least.
Katanga only ever had a maximum of 3 Fouga CM 170 Magisters, basically a 2 seater training aircraft which could and was, used as a ground attack plane by the Katangese. But as a night fighter it was totally unsuitable, Hamaskjolds plane crashed at just after midnight, the time was ascertained by the watches found on the bodies, in an area that large. . Despite the damage caused by the resultant fire, no signs of any such attack was found on the plane or bodies recovered. It was almost certainly pilot error by him misjudging his height on his approach to Ndola, the wheels were found to be locked down for landing and the attitude of the plane and the 800 yd long trail of damage to trees etc showed that. The pilot had already requested clearance for landing at Ndola at 22.38, at 00.10 he reported "lights in sight" and a Police officer in Ndola heard an aircraft just after that and not long after saw a flash in the sky. It was as a result of that that the Police searches began not long afterwards from 4 stations in the surrounding area,
This was a pilot who took off from Leopoldville filing a flight plan for Luluaboug, and then went on to fly over lake Tanganyika, (the blue area to the left of Albertville) to avoid flying over Katanga, to get to Ndola, which is located about 100 odd miles S.E. of Elizabethville on the map below. That would have added over 1000 miles to his journey, so after being in the air for almost 7 hours he would be pretty tired and messed up his preparations for landing.
But hey who wants to spoil the conspiracy theorists reports of numerous people allegedly seeing a second jet shooting at another. This is an area which apart from the mining town of Ndola and a few other mining towns to the N. W. only had a very few widely scattered very small African villages with only rough bush tracks between them, so few, if any, reliable witnesses.






This is a video of the crash scene, showing Police who guarded the scene. the only sign of a weapon is a fire damage pistol @ about 1.43 probably from one of his security detail.
dag hammarskold crash - Bing video
 
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Oyibo

LE
Here's a photo of a Ugandan PWD grader :-

View attachment 421589
Believe or not, I have driven over roads made of sugar in Katanga. The sugar liquid dries into a pliable hard-wearing surface just as good as bitumen. (It turns black very quickly in case anyone is wondering.)
 
Believe or not, I have driven over roads made of sugar in Katanga. The sugar liquid dries into a pliable hard-wearing surface just as good as bitumen. (It turns black very quickly in case anyone is wondering.)


Hmm.. don't the locals tear it up almost as soon as its dried to take home for nosh?
 

Oyibo

LE
Hmm.. don't the locals tear it up almost as soon as its dried to take home for nosh?
The money for the locals is in the minerals in the region - copper, cobalt, and uranium ore. Chinese traders buy it. For poor quality copper ore a sack will be paid for with a bowl of beans. I shit you not.

Charcoal is also big in Katanga, but without the Chinese traders
 
Believe or not, I have driven over roads made of sugar in Katanga. The sugar liquid dries into a pliable hard-wearing surface just as good as bitumen. (It turns black very quickly in case anyone is wondering.)
Was that raw cane sugar or molasses (also known as black treacle)? The latter is a by product of sugar refining and a lot cheaper than refined sugar and the lower grades are sometimes used in cattle feed, and even I think at one time as an additive to mortar for bricks.

If they refined a significant amount of sugar in Katanga then molasses could have been in surplus and so quite cheap there. Using it to pave roads could have been useful as a way of getting rid of it without simply burying it or dumping it in a river.
 

Oyibo

LE
Was that raw cane sugar or molasses (also known as black treacle)? The latter is a by product of sugar refining and a lot cheaper than refined sugar and the lower grades are sometimes used in cattle feed, and even I think at one time as an additive to mortar for bricks.

If they refined a significant amount of sugar in Katanga then molasses could have been in surplus and so quite cheap there. Using it to pave roads could have been useful as a way of getting rid of it without simply burying it or dumping it in a river.
Very probably molasses - it was explained to me by a Frenchman who wasn't sure himself, but his explanation tallies with yours. I never saw any sugar cane in DRC (it's a big country though), but I dare say molasses is a damn sight cheaper there than bitumen.
 

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