Tales of a Colonial Policeman

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
My bold .. most definitely, in an earlier post I gave an example of how I almost certainly owe my life to the brave actions of one of my sergeants and men during one riot. Indeed the motto of the Northern Rhodesia Regiment, which was until 1933 a part of the NRP is "Different in Race, Equal in Fidelity", which says it all!
Our march past was "We are all of one tribe and that tribe is the NRP".
I think every European who served with the African police or troops have a huge respect & affection for them. Reading the book "Imperial Sunset" by James Lunt, I think it was commonplace in virtually all our African forces where they served with distinction in WW1, WW2, and various other conflicts like Malaya.
Which makes seeing the absolute shambles their politicians have led them into, heart breaking.

It's useful to bear in mind that someone voted to put those political arseclowns in power in the first place, and to keep them there.
 
It's useful to bear in mind that someone voted to put those political arseclowns in power in the first place, and to keep them there.
[DRIFT]

One could say the same about some UK elections, and resulting "Governments" :( .

[/DRIFT]
 
Quite so. Applies to the whole filthy stinking lot. The severity of the pisstake a good indicator of the lack of DF of those who keep them in power.
 
Whilst looking for something else on the net I found these photos which give an insight to the early days when we fought as infantry in WW1

Major JJ O'Sullevan DSO Northern Rhodesia Police , who just happened to be the father of the famous horse racing commentator Peter O'Sullevan.
 
This is another of some of our early policemen in 1914 whilst fighting in German East Africa

Below: A detachment of the Northern Rhodesia Police note the bare feet.

 
Whilst looking for something else on the net I found these photos which give an insight to the early days when we fought as infantry in WW1

Major JJ O'Sullevan DSO Northern Rhodesia Police , who just happened to be the father of the famous horse racing commentator Peter O'Sullevan.
Have you read 'Tales From the Dark Continent' yet? The stories are fascinating - albeit from before our time - and there are a few tales from the areas in which you worked
 
Have you read 'Tales From the Dark Continent' yet? The stories are fascinating - albeit from before our time - and there are a few tales from the areas in which you worked

Not yet.. I will try & get a copy on this "tinterweb" thingy I use occasionally. I did that when I got hold of "Imperial Sunset" by James Lunt.
Anyone who hasn't got hold of "No better life" by John Gornall, it is available on Amazon in Kindle form & I would urge anyone who liked my tales, to read it, he was there 10 years, so a couple of years before me and several years after in the Zambia era. Importantly he gives a disturbing account of how quickly things started falling apart on independence, when political appointees immediately started abusing their power!!
 
Not yet.. I will try & get a copy on this "tinterweb" thingy I use occasionally. I did that when I got hold of "Imperial Sunset" by James Lunt.
Anyone who hasn't got hold of "No better life" by John Gornall, it is available on Amazon in Kindle form & I would urge anyone who liked my tales, to read it, he was there 10 years, so a couple of years before me and several years after in the Zambia era. Importantly he gives a disturbing account of how quickly things started falling apart on independence, when political appointees immediately started abusing their power!!
Thanks for the recommendation. I have read your tales with interest. No better life will be downloaded to kindle tonight.
 
Thanks for the recommendation. I have read your tales with interest. No better life will be downloaded to kindle tonight.


I think you will enjoy it IMHO he goes a long way to explaining the problems that, not only N. Rhodesia had after independence, but most of the rest of sub Saharan Africa has, explaining the tribal & witchcraft problems which Colonial rule was only starting to get to grips with.
 
how quickly things started falling apart on independence
It's a bit annoying when the system stops telling you about a new post, and I seem to have missed a few weeks' worth here.
Still. Of some relevance, perhaps, (or maybe not, but of some interest in context), was a piece in the Guardian yesterday which got my ire up. 60 or so years after Independence in Tanganyika Territory (Now, of course, Tanzania), the evil British are blamed for actions taken by local 'officials' today. Naturally, the Guardian won't allow the plebeian classes to comment on such a sensitive issue (homosexuality, which isn't really the point of my objection), so I sent the bastards a letter:
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In the piece today (04 November 2018) headed ‘A tainted imperial legacy that fuels the oppression of gay people in Africa’ (US warns its citizens in Tanzania over anti-gay crackdown) your correspondent lays the blame for last weeks’ action by Tanzanian officials against homosexual activity in the country on Britain, its past colonial service and laws.

This is such an unhinged accusation that it deserves refutation, with an accompanying accusation of severe and deep racial prejudice in the correspondent, and your Editor for considering it as worthy of publication.

Tanzania gained Independence on 9 December 1961, almost 60 years ago; I was there. By blaming the lawmakers of well over half a century ago for today’s events, your correspondent insults both them and the Tanzanian legislators of the intervening years; all of them. Not content with that, she insults the people of Tanzania for being incapable of assuming responsibility for their own laws and institutions. Many of the bases of those institutions; legal, administrative, Parliamentary, were put down by the British administration, and well have they served. I have lived and worked in the country for some years since, and the essence of fair and just Law is more evident there than in many another African country. However, it is the Tanzanian people who have had responsibility for their maintenance, reform and improvement in those years.

I understand that the debilitating effect of ‘aid’ may have sapped the will and intellect, and fuelled the anger against its ‘donors’ of some who pretend to speak for Tanzania, but this is really no excuse whatsoever.

You do Tanzania and its people no service with this report. You and your correspondent should apologise to them and us.
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If the scummy brutes won't publish the letter, it's at least in cyberspace. Delete that, you frigging unpaid intern 'Moderators'. I'm getting more and more irate about sections of society which won't allow the views of all to be aired; after all, I allow Corbyn to fart his despicable opinions in public without taking the 7.62 solution.
 
It's a bit annoying when the system stops telling you about a new post, and I seem to have missed a few weeks' worth here.
Still. Of some relevance, perhaps, (or maybe not, but of some interest in context), was a piece in the Guardian yesterday which got my ire up. 60 or so years after Independence in Tanganyika Territory (Now, of course, Tanzania), the evil British are blamed for actions taken by local 'officials' today. Naturally, the Guardian won't allow the plebeian classes to comment on such a sensitive issue (homosexuality, which isn't really the point of my objection), so I sent the bastards a letter:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
In the piece today (04 November 2018) headed ‘A tainted imperial legacy that fuels the oppression of gay people in Africa’ (US warns its citizens in Tanzania over anti-gay crackdown) your correspondent lays the blame for last weeks’ action by Tanzanian officials against homosexual activity in the country on Britain, its past colonial service and laws.

This is such an unhinged accusation that it deserves refutation, with an accompanying accusation of severe and deep racial prejudice in the correspondent, and your Editor for considering it as worthy of publication.

Tanzania gained Independence on 9 December 1961, almost 60 years ago; I was there. By blaming the lawmakers of well over half a century ago for today’s events, your correspondent insults both them and the Tanzanian legislators of the intervening years; all of them. Not content with that, she insults the people of Tanzania for being incapable of assuming responsibility for their own laws and institutions. Many of the bases of those institutions; legal, administrative, Parliamentary, were put down by the British administration, and well have they served. I have lived and worked in the country for some years since, and the essence of fair and just Law is more evident there than in many another African country. However, it is the Tanzanian people who have had responsibility for their maintenance, reform and improvement in those years.

I understand that the debilitating effect of ‘aid’ may have sapped the will and intellect, and fuelled the anger against its ‘donors’ of some who pretend to speak for Tanzania, but this is really no excuse whatsoever.

You do Tanzania and its people no service with this report. You and your correspondent should apologise to them and us.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
If the scummy brutes won't publish the letter, it's at least in cyberspace. Delete that, you frigging unpaid intern 'Moderators'. I'm getting more and more irate about sections of society which won't allow the views of all to be aired; after all, I allow Corbyn to fart his despicable opinions in public without taking the 7.62 solution.


My bold.. I agree, I get angry whenever I see an article or watch a TV program which does this sort of thing, blaming the evil European for all the ills of modern Africa. Slavery is always used as a convenient target. These morons forget that the Arabs on the East & North coasts were doing it centuries before the West coast trade started and continued to do so over 100 years after we had banned it. Not to mention inter tribal slavery.
There seems to be in most of these idiots mind some sort of mythical, historic African Utopia, where they all lived in healthy harmony in a prosperous, democratic sub Saharan continental wonderland, where there was an unending abundance of easily obtainable food & water, where incredible festivals of music & art were the order of the day, where there was no endemic diseases, famines, droughts, crime or war and possibly the odd Unicorn would appear occasionally to amuse the children. All of course irreparably spoilt by the intrusion of the cruel, despotic, avaricious Europeans who killed & plundered all indiscriminately.
All this of course totally at odds with the truth of a harsh, often inhospitable & unhealthy land inhabited by numerous disparate tribes, ruled by cruel despotic chiefs who raided neighbouring tribes for land, cattle & slaves without a second thought. Most of whom were riddled with different tribal religions & sinister Witchcraft often involving cannibalism.
Livingstone & the flood of Christian missionaries who followed him in the second half of the 19C were the ones who often begged the European powers to send troops to stop the slavery and tribal wars, to protect their flocks. The Europeans were well on their way to stopping most of these practices when the African Politicians, not normally from the tribal chiefs but often missionary trained & indoctrinated by socialist thinking, decided they wanted to take over and get their snouts in the trough.
As I have already said having just come out of WW2 flat broke and where in order to obtain US support we had to promise to give "freedom" to our colonies, Britain didn't have the stomach to resist these calls. The Soviet bloc also added their support to these so called "Freedom" movements in order to destabilise the West further.
Most of us who worked in or for the govt. realised that given most of Africa, apart from the coastal regions had not even see a white man until less than a 100 years earlier and most for only about 50 years and taking a population out of the iron age to the nuclear age would take quite a bit longer before they could run themselves.
But I find that the idiots who blame us are just that, morons who in the main have never been to Africa & have no idea of the problems there. When you look at the £/$ trillions poured into the continent in aid & charities since "freedom" and all you see is a small political/military elite enriching themselves to the detriment of the rest of each country, where infrastructure is often worse now than under the former colonial administrations. And yet these morons still think we owe them even more it makes my blood boil.
 
(...) These morons forget that the Arabs on the East & North coasts were doing it centuries before the West coast trade started and continued to do so over 100 years after we had banned it. (...)
The European West African slave trade began by tapping into an existing slave trade which ran from the sub-Saharan to what are now Morocco and Algeria. There were several slave routes, and one ran along the west coast. When the Europeans started sugar plantations on the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, they tapped into that slave trade for a supply of labour. When the New World was discovered and the sugar industry established there, European slave traders moved south to get closer to the source of supply of slaves in order to cut out the middleman.

All this of course totally at odds with the truth of a harsh, often inhospitable & unhealthy land inhabited by numerous disparate tribes, ruled by cruel despotic chiefs who raided neighbouring tribes for land, cattle & slaves without a second thought. Most of whom were riddled with different tribal religions & sinister Witchcraft often involving cannibalism. (...)
This was probably not that much different from how people in the rest of the world lived during most of pre-history. Some modern historians think the reason that Africa didn't progress while much of the rest of the world did was that geography and climate isolated them from the mainstream of progress occurring across Europe and Asia. The latter regions progressed more quickly because trade, travel, and warfare brought more people into regular contact with each other.

In African this sort of regular contact didn't really happen for the vast majority of people until railways and motor vehicles arrived, which was quite recently. Social change on the scale we are talking about will take generations.
 
The European West African slave trade began by tapping into an existing slave trade which ran from the sub-Saharan to what are now Morocco and Algeria. There were several slave routes, and one ran along the west coast. When the Europeans started sugar plantations on the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, they tapped into that slave trade for a supply of labour. When the New World was discovered and the sugar industry established there, European slave traders moved south to get closer to the source of supply of slaves in order to cut out the middleman.


This was probably not that much different from how people in the rest of the world lived during most of pre-history. Some modern historians think the reason that Africa didn't progress while much of the rest of the world did was that geography and climate isolated them from the mainstream of progress occurring across Europe and Asia. The latter regions progressed more quickly because trade, travel, and warfare brought more people into regular contact with each other.

In African this sort of regular contact didn't really happen for the vast majority of people until railways and motor vehicles arrived, which was quite recently. Social change on the scale we are talking about will take generations.[/
QUOTE]


My bold.. indeed many forget that The wheel was not invented/introduced into parts of Africa until the late 19th century, as quoted by Milton Friedman during a discussion.
 
The European West African slave trade began by tapping into an existing slave trade which ran from the sub-Saharan to what are now Morocco and Algeria. There were several slave routes, and one ran along the west coast. When the Europeans started sugar plantations on the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, they tapped into that slave trade for a supply of labour. When the New World was discovered and the sugar industry established there, European slave traders moved south to get closer to the source of supply of slaves in order to cut out the middleman.


This was probably not that much different from how people in the rest of the world lived during most of pre-history. Some modern historians think the reason that Africa didn't progress while much of the rest of the world did was that geography and climate isolated them from the mainstream of progress occurring across Europe and Asia. The latter regions progressed more quickly because trade, travel, and warfare brought more people into regular contact with each other.

In African this sort of regular contact didn't really happen for the vast majority of people until railways and motor vehicles arrived, which was quite recently. Social change on the scale we are talking about will take generations
.



My bold.. The wheel was not invented/introduced into parts of Africa until the late 19th century, as quoted by Milton Friedman during a discussion. This explained a lot!!
 
This was probably not that much different from how people in the rest of the world lived during most of pre-history. Some modern historians think the reason that Africa didn't progress while much of the rest of the world did was that geography and climate isolated them from the mainstream of progress occurring across Europe and Asia. The latter regions progressed more quickly because trade, travel, and warfare brought more people into regular contact with each other.

In African this sort of regular contact didn't really happen for the vast majority of people until railways and motor vehicles arrived, which was quite recently. Social change on the scale we are talking about will take generations.

Its debatable (or, perhaps, undebatable, in today's social climate).

Significant parts of Africa have now had exposure to the global village, and mentoring by its inhabitants (via colonialism), for ten to fifteen generations.

Prior to European trade/colonies, the east coast of Africa had Indian and Arabic trade and settlement (oh, and slavery) continuously since biblical times.

There is depressingly scant evidence of any resultant social change in African societies, in fact the reverse as post-colonial regression appears to be the norm.

Compare this with, say, Indian or asian societies that experienced a similar step-change via colonialism.
 
My bold.. The wheel was not invented/introduced into parts of Africa until the late 19th century, as quoted by Milton Friedman during a discussion. This explained a lot!!
The wheel was not invented in North or South America either, despite Mexico, Central America, and the Andes having some very sophisticated civilizations comparable in many ways to ancient Egypt. It has been theorized that this was at least partially due to them not having any suitable draft animals. They also didn't develop the smelting of metals.

Just what induces technological innovation in traditional societies is something that we don't have any definite answers to. However, once a useful innovation was created knowledge of it could travel long distances fairly rapidly. Europe, the Middle East, India, and China were all in regular contact with each other for millennia, either directly or indirectly.

Most of Africa however was not. They were isolated from Europe by the Sahara Desert, and geography meant that the best habitable areas were inland but had poor communications with the coast. The southern tip of Africa was an exception to this, but they were isolated by shear distance. The end result is that Africa was left out of the mainstream of development happening across Europe and Asia.

North and South America were as well, but conditions there allowed for progress to be made independently in isolation. However, the smaller scale as compared to Europe and Asia meant that progress took place more slowly. It is also worth noting how progress was very uneven within the New World as well. A few civilizations existed on either side of the equator, but the people across the vast bulk of the two continents were at a considerably less advanced state of development.
 

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