Tactical Recognition Flashes (TRF)

Discussion in 'Weapons, Equipment & Rations' started by Mike_2817, Dec 13, 2004.

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  1. Here is the Army Dress Committees final list (dated May 2004)
    http://www.army.mod.uk/presscentre/rank_and_regimental_insignia/Tactical_Recognition_Flashes.htm

    How many are actually being worn?

    From what I have been told, The existence of a TRF Design approved and ‘registered’ by/with the Army Dress Committee does not indicate that the given Regiment or Corps will in fact ever wear it!

    But units assigned to 16 Air Assault Brigade will wear that TRF as its DZ Flash. Units that had more than 1 DZ Flash (other than the Parachute Regiment) will in future only wear the Regimental TRF (What about the Royal Engineer EOD Flash should no longer be worn, and the RLC Black/Red should be changed to Blue/Yellow)

    If this is followed to the letter, I will be very surprised !!!
     
  2. msr

    msr LE

    Royal Electrcal and Mechanical Engineers
    Staff and Pesonnel Support
    The Lacastrian and Cumbrian Volunteers
    The Prince of Wale's Own Regiment
    The Pricess of Wale's Royal Regiment


    I know that some of these regiments face disbanding, but at least spell their names correctly FFS :evil:

    msr
     
  3. 8) I'm sure you noticed, but Tell the MOD - It's their webpage!! :lol:
     
  4. So the vets have got one but the RAMC haven't - so the medics are being typically stand-offish about dressing like the rest of the army then?
     
  5. I think the AMS (RAMC/RADC/QARANC/Field Ambulances) is the Red Cross on White when in the field,
    but what about the rest of the time? perhaps a Red Cross Flash!

    The RMP is also not listed but use the Black MP on Red

    Also what of the Intelligence Corps? Do they want to blend in by not wearing one?
     
  6. ViroBono

    ViroBono LE Moderator

    The Red Cross is not a TRF, but a protected symbol within the meaning of the Geneva Conventions, used to identify medical personnel irrespective of what side they are on. It should always be worn on the left arm.
     
  7. thanks for that page. I just love how easy it is to find anything on the army website if you dont know the exact page. :roll:

    I'm looking forard to telling our colonel that the really naff one he gave us is illegal (the story doing the rounds is that his wife designed it).

    Or maybe not. I dont think Mrs Emperor would appreciate it if I tell her she has to take all the old ones off and sew on some new boy scout badges! :D
     
  8. You mean - design something from the user's point of view? The horror.....the horror....
     
  9. You'll notice this one was next to the Kingo's flash: scouse feckers have nicked the s :D
     
  10. [/quote]The Red Cross is not a TRF, but a protected symbol within the meaning of the Geneva Conventions, used to identify medical personnel irrespective of what side they are on. It should always be worn on the left arm

    VB, not quite correct. Thje Red Cross armband isn't a mediacl symbol either, but signifies a non-combatant. That's why non medical RAMC personnel wear them, as do padres.
     
  11. Also spotted this one, on the "official list"


    "The Pricess of Wale's Royal Regiment."

    Perhaps produced by a journalist, or someone dylsexic :?:
     
  12. msr spotted a few typos earler!
     
  13. Ironic that the OTC don't get one, as we are closest to the boy scouts in role surely WE should have the proffusion of badges?
     
  14. Just to add to the debate, and to confirm comments. Here is an extract from the Nov 2004 Poster. (The current issue)

    These are not listed on the MOD page:

    [​IMG]
     
  15. ViroBono

    ViroBono LE Moderator

    Interesting. The instructions appear to contradict themselves - the Red Cross is always worn on the left, and there are two sizes - larger for clinical staff and smaller for support staff. Each badge has to be stamped to validate it. It is also worn by many civilians engaged in humanitarian work. Its use is also governed by the Geneva Conventions.