Taboo subjects in Brit Culture that most Americans don't grasp?

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Throw a Brit in the mix who starts effing and blinding making it quite clear that they are going to get a kicking momentarily...
Another one that has caused amusement.
In the US it is used, amongst the press at least, to mean "in a moment" as opposed to "for a moment."

I recall watching a news item about a presidential visit somewhere or other, which showed footage of the pax door of Airforce One on the apron and the assembled journos were waiting for the cheese to pitch.
The telly reporter tried to fill in the time by repeatedly saying, "and this is the door where the president will appear momentarily."
We had visions of the besuited main man hopping into the doorway, smiling, then jumping backwards out of shot.
 
Reversing into spaces is illegal in some jurisdictions. Don't ask me why/ how..

Drivers surprised, frustrated with tickets for reversing into stalls

One reason given these days is if you reverse into spaces, ANPR systems (for LE, parking tickets etc.) won't work as they won't be able to see you number plate - remember, in quite a few states you don't need a front number plate? But again, this law was there before ANPR systems were even in place...but cops could still want to see the plate while driving by.

Also, things like being able to put your shopping in the trunk/boot easily if the trunk is facing out - but that's convenience.

There are a myriad no of reasons and speculation for this:

https://www.quora.com/Why-do-some-j...e-as-you-are-less-likely-to-back-over-someone


Also,
It’s much safer to back into parking spaces. Why don’t we do it?

I admit..my own driving habits changed a bit more since I moved here, not that I drive much anyways. I do reverse a bit more into spaces now. Used to do it in the states but not much.
In one of the examples given it's diagonal ones, where if you reverse in you may come out facing against the flow of traffic and your direction of travel.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
I have seen one street in Glasgow where it is illegal to drive nose first into the parking spaces, (Outside Hughenden Sports Ground in the West End) and I did see tickets given out during events like rugby matches or sports days.
"Hug-hen-den" ?
Heard from a professional toastmaster at a large dinner.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
In one of the examples given it's diagonal ones, where if you reverse in you may come out facing against the flow of traffic and your direction of travel.
These two do not necessarily equate.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
The tins, along with corned beef tins and spam tins, are bloody dangerous. I'm pretty sure they make scalpels from the sharp edges of corned beef tins. And those bloody keys...
When the doris first encountered these she had to be briefed on how to use them.
Fast fwd a month or so and she complained that the strip had broken off and couldn't open the tin.
Foolishly, instead of using EDIP, I merely advised her to get a tin opener.
You can guess the rest...

Re. the pies, I have never gotten the 'pastry' to look, taste or feel like pastry.
Cook for longer at a lower heat.
Can always give it a bit more at the end if it's not turned golden brown.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Reverse parallel parking was part of my Texas driving test.
I subsequently never parallel parked in the 2 years I lived there.
 
It's not just Americans who sometimes find place names difficult. I once heard a British radio presenter play a record request for a lady who apparently lived in Bury Street, Edmunds........
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
But not usually reversing into a space to be fair.
One of mine refused to reverse a car into any space because, verbatim: "if you drive in forwards it's easier to get out because you just reverse straight out."
 
One of mine refused to reverse a car into any space because, verbatim: "if you drive in forwards it's easier to get out because you just reverse straight out."
I hope you still have her, she's a keeper.
 
It's not just Americans who sometimes find place names difficult. I once heard a British radio presenter play a record request for a lady who apparently lived in Bury Street, Edmunds........
Ain't that the truth. My teeth are set on a daily basis by the mispronunciation of Scottish placenames by English TV announcers. I'm not talking about Milngavie or Auchtermuchty, I talking about places like Dundee and Aberdeen.
For some reason, the BBC have it in their head that emphasis should be on the first syllable - DUN-dee, ABER-deen - which is incorrect, it's Dun-DEE and Aber-DEEN.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
It's not just Americans who sometimes find place names difficult. I once heard a British radio presenter play a record request for a lady who apparently lived in Bury Street, Edmunds........
Air Traffic joke:

“London Control, US Airforce 218 overhead Stabbs”

“London say again”

“US 218 overhead Stabbs”

“London roger sir understood, that’s actually Saint Abbs sir”

“218 er, roger thanks”

“London, what will be your next reporting point?”

“218 standby”

.

“London 218”

“218 London go ahead”

“Next report will be at Saint Ornaway”
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Ain't that the truth. My teeth are set on a daily basis by the mispronunciation of Scottish placenames by English TV announcers. I'm not talking about Milngavie or Auchtermuchty, I talking about places like Dundee and Aberdeen.
For some reason, the BBC have it in their head that emphasis should be on the first syllable - DUN-dee, ABER-deen - which is incorrect, it's Dun-DEE and Aber-DEEN.
I never cease to rue the closure of the BBC's pronunciation department to whom a newsreader was expected to address every punctuation question for a definitive and exact answer.

Now they ask someone with half an idea and amplify anything obviously not English to show their lingual superiority. Two that grate from recent football, Belo Horizonte becomes Belo HorizonCH.

A (I think Honduran, Leicester City) player's surname Ulloah becomes UJJoah. We know that in Spanish double L becomes a Y or an LY sound (qv Medellin) depending on the dialect with potentially a hint of J (qv Majorca/Mallorca), but no, not the BBC. Let's RAM THE J SOUND DOWN YOUR THROAT so you know we are the BBC and superior.
 
In one of the examples given its diagonal ones, where if you reverse in you may come out facing against the flow of traffic and your direction of travel.
For those of us taught to park safely, i.e. reverse in, these are one life's real irritations, people who are stupid enough to force you to park in a dangerous manner.
 
Ain't that the truth. My teeth are set on a daily basis by the mispronunciation of Scottish placenames by English TV announcers. I'm not talking about Milngavie or Auchtermuchty, I talking about places like Dundee and Aberdeen.
For some reason, the BBC have it in their head that emphasis should be on the first syllable - DUN-dee, ABER-deen - which is incorrect, it's Dun-DEE and Aber-DEEN.
The worst BBC one is not a mispronunciation but just wrong and regularly appears on traffic reports, "St George's Square in Glasgow" it's either George Square the centre of the city, or St George's Cross miles away and the start of the west of the city or St George's Mansions at Charring Cross on the way between them, which also get confused by díckheads..

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