TA and the Taliban

#1
Just seen and advert for this, may be of interest. Did a quick search and didnt see any other threads on it.

TA and the Taliban

This brand new six-part ob-doc series follows a group of unheralded heroes thrust into the line of fire and focuses on the story of part-time Territorial Army members serving in Afghanistan.

Made with exclusive access facilitated by the MOD, The TA & The Taliban is the story of 12 ordinary people who have chosen to leave their families and day jobs in Britain behind to serve alongside soldiers over 3,500 miles away in some of the most dangerous places in the world. We'll follow them to the war zones of Kandahar and the British military base, Camp Bastion, which becomes their home, and see how the long-distance communications become the link these brave volunteers have to their families back in Britain.

We'll meet George the electrician, Claire the nurse, Craig the furniture designer, water meter reader Anthony, and financial product advisor Ben. Under the promise of adventure and a desire to offer security to the people of Afghanistan, these regular work-a-day people become the heroes of another country.

The series follows the recruits as they enjoy their last days at work and home, before embarking on MOD pre-deployment training, and wave emotional goodbyes to their families. George, Claire, Anthony and the others then begin their new lives as part-time soldiers and are instantly plunges them into the theatre of war.
Hopefully It will provide an accurate picture of the realities of TA mobilisation without becoming a "look how hard we have it" whingefest
 
#2
I doubt it will be helpful. Frankly we (the TA) should be making a concerted effort to keep a low profile at the moment and being as "one army" as possible not emphasising our seperateness. BSN and KAF? Who gives a ****. I can hear the cries of derision already.
 
#5
I bet this will be for the TA what that REMF fest 'warzone' was for the RAF.
I hope not, but it could well be cringeworthy hence my
Hopefully It will provide an accurate picture of the realities of TA mobilisation without becoming a "look how hard we have it" whingefest
comment. When I say the realities of TA mobilisation I mean mainly squaring it that you still have a job to come back to, if it takes the "this is really tough I miss my wife and kids" angle then its missed the point, the blokes that its filming will all have volunteered to go and the regs dont have that luxury. However I do share theblindkings concern that this could drive the wedge deeper between the TA and the regular army, depending on how its filmed.
 
#6
The series follows the recruits as they enjoy their last days at work and home, before embarking on MOD pre-deployment training, and wave emotional goodbyes to their families. George, Claire, Anthony and the others then begin their new lives as part-time soldiers and are instantly plunges them into the theatre of war.
I don't need to watch it to know that it's going to be shit. They've spent all that time filming and haven't worked out that their subjects aren't recruits and aren't beginning their lives as part-time soldiers, but as full-time soldiers.
 
#10
*deleted*

oops, sorry. I thought this was going to be a thread asking if you could join both.
 
#12
These jokers followed me around for a bit, filmed my last day at work, filmed the parents etc but lost interest when my girlfriend refused to let them film her crying or us saying goodbye before I left. I remember having to do some "fake typing" while not being able to see my computer screen because the screen wasn't in the right (ie in front of my face) place.

The fact that there wasn't enough crying in the bits they filmed with me should tell you about the slant they are putting on it. The woman who filmed me said they were more interested in the human interest than anything else.
 
#13
Ditto for me, only interested in getting the emotional goodbye with the family, refused. My wife was told I would be filmed in theatre, but they were having trouble getting transport to my location. Didn't hear anymore.
 
#14
...and were you both recruits, about to learn how to be part-time soldiers (as the spiel indicated)?
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#15
Is Bravo Bravo in it? :eye:
 
#17
Hey, BB is my hero. He's nails and I would follow him to the mouth of hell any day. Mind you, I would firmly stop there and let him carry on.
 
#18
...and were you both recruits, about to learn how to be part-time soldiers (as the spiel indicated)?
Nope, second tour.

Expect a lot of crying and final goodbyes to pluck on ye olde heart strings and make the women well up. They even made my Dad cry when they interviewed him and I have seen him cry precisely twice in my life, once at his Mums funeral and once when he came back from having a dog put down. Quite manipulative as you'd expect them to be, tried to literally drag my girlfriend into the toilets when she got emotional at my leaving doo at work to film her and were visibly wound up when she wouldn't play up to them. They were shameless and brazen, one question as my girlfriend got upset was "are you worried about him getting killed?". Having just watched the trailer for it I can see in my minds eye how some of those scenes were shot and the questions they'd ask and the things they'd say to get you to react how they wanted. In the filming on my last day at work they asked me if I thought my training was adequate, when I said I felt that the training and kit was actually very good now and that I was confident in it her reaction was "really? there must be something you're not happy with" and I knew right there and then which bit was going to go in the documentary, the bit where I slagged off my training or kit and I wouldn't do it which again wound her up. Didn't like being played at their own game.

They were completely uninterested in anything beyond the human story when they were interviewing me anyway. And they never told me that they were going to stop filming me, just bizarrely sent my parents a box of chocolates at Xmas time. Guess the intern (slave) fucked up. But I guess thats show business baby! I was glad they didn't follow up as they were a massive pain in the arse for the short time they did film me, even down to re-arranging the order of seating in the ******* pub on my leaving doo. Hardly the stand back and observe documentary. Christ knows what they would have got up to with me out in the FOB - try to get me walking back and forward over an IED treeline so they could get the right focus and light.

That film crew were the single biggest source of tension between me and my Mrs before going away! As you can probably tell! Nightmare! Why did I agree to do it, (a) it seemed like a fun idea at the time and (b) I was naive enough to think I could actually put across some valid points about life in the TA and the stresses and strains of anyone going on tour. Plus I thought it would be a Ross Kemp style thing, they'd just sit back and watch whatever happened but it was all prodding and poking to get you to do the things they wanted.

I guess the others got on fine with it and enjoyed doing it, but it clearly didn't suit me or my Mrs.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
#19
If it is the same film crew, Karma caught up with them. They decided to leave filming at 3 Para to go to 2 Para where they felt they "would get closer to the action" - they were basically searching for a TIC to film.

The cameraman got slightly more up close and personal than he expected and got to enjoy watching the MERT in action due to the 7.62 short sized holes in his leg!
 
#20
That wouldn't be Karma to that woman who interviewed!

That would be the best scoop ever and even better because it happened to the cameraman and not her!

Bless him though. Getting shot and all that. Who'd believe that contacts weren't all just cool filming opportunities?
 
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