TA Advantage over Regulars?

Chef

LE
A simple wrong turn, in a place such as Northern Ireland, has resulted in disaster.
A lot of local people know their locality really well. More than a regular army unit could ever begin to..
Absolutely, no problems with that. But by the time that becomes an advantage it's all over bar the shouting.

Europe 1940-45 knee deep in resistance fighters (specially France, allegedly) full of local knowledge. Minimal effect on the occupying troops. Overlord and Bagration is what saw the Germans signing surrender papers, not a slack handful of undoubtedly motivated, brave local fighters.

Malaya lots of local knowledge there I should think, who won?

As for NI, local disasters yes but a couple of points to consider:

1) Was Op Banner a full scale military operation?

2)Who, theoretically, handed their weapons in?
 
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Glue_Sniffer

Old-Salt
In a Home Guard/home defence role? Then yes, local knowledge and connection to the population in the area can be an advantage.

Don't forget that the Army Reserve is more than just infantry, there are a good many specialist units too.

As to the local knowledge, the Reserves have been cut back over the course of many years, and a lot of the country no longer has a 'local' infantry unit.
 
The STABs might do a better job as a Defensive obstacle. I mean, imagine clearing the fat cúnts' carcasses off the battlefield when you're trying to invade...

 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reservists often bring a range of specialist skills with them , usually at a far lower pay scale than they normally work for
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
That's going back over twenty years to when you had home defence TA units and NATO reinforcements.
The question was whether you preferred to get nuked at home or run over as a speed bump when the 3rd Shock rolled over the West German border.
It may feel like twenty to you but it's actually closer to thirty years grandpa.

With reference to the 3rd Shock Army , all historians agree that the Warsaw Pact had no chance against a BAOR equipped with that rifle and a far superior tolerance to excessive alcohol consumption.
 
It may feel like twenty to you but it's actually closer to thirty years grandpa.

With reference to the 3rd Shock Army , all historians agree that the Warsaw Pact had no chance against a BAOR equipped with that rifle and a far superior tolerance to excessive alcohol consumption.
Snappers to the front! ;-)
 

Chef

LE
Bring back the Fencibles say I.
 

Mufulira

War Hero
Reservists often bring a range of specialist skills with them , usually at a far lower pay scale than they normally work for
Having served as both Regular and latterly as Territorial, there was a great deal of expertise found amid the not exactly teeming masses of TA potential 'cannon fodder'. When spare parts became unobtainable for Vickers MMG's -- Yes, dear readers, the TA were always supplied with previous generation firepower and most of them were made of Unobtanium , so parts were fabricated by skilled Fitters & Turners at their respective work sites and the Battalions chugged along. Armoured cars of WWII vintage (Staghounds, Marmon-Harringtons,) etc were employed well past their due dates. Certain civvy skills such as Aerial Mag & EM photogrammetry, map-making, very long distance (25mile) shots in surveying, geological exploration and a host of other skills come also to mind My impressions were, perhaps derived from seeing how well they did perform with so little. Some UK Yeomanry units seemed to me to be similarly gifted in having members with scarcely advertised 'skills'
 
I can't believe I'm getting grief for misnaming a place and people are not only accepting but responding to a question that compares the UDR to the TA.


Wait...

No. I CAN believe it. Thats what I meant.
 
I can't believe I'm getting grief for misnaming a place and people are not only accepting but responding to a question that compares the UDR to the TA.
You may not be aware but both organisations used the same attestation form (in 1975 anyway). I nearly joined the UDR by mistake but noticed that the Pay Sgt had put a cross in the wrong box.

"Now just an effing minute..."
"Sorry, my mistake".

I've always wondered whether he was on commission.
 
Well that's an interesting point.
TA implies a Home Guard / HSF / UDR type role.
AR implies they fill the gaps in expeditionary warfare.

Interesting that the government changed the name, just as the expeditionary campaigns were winding down..
The renaming was a particularly spurious smoke and mirrors trick to make it seem the Regular Reserves were functional by hiding both regular and TA under one banner.

Complete bollocks then and still complete bollocks now
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
The regular reserves were a joke....a few rolled up for a camp with my TA signals squadron one year, but needed a complete rekit the SQMS was a mix of annoyed as he had better things to do during a mobex, and delighted as they were handing in stuff he'd never seen before, like anklets, and pre-DPM combats, which the regimental museum was after.

At one brigade study period the officer in charge of the notional 2000+ RSignals RRs admitted that they hadn't a clue where most of them were. what kit they had or even if they'd show up on QO2. He certainly didn't like the obvious next question which was why, in that case, were they counted into the orbat.

On local knowledge it's not just a case of living there but of doing the same military job year in, year out. We knew our AOR very well in civilian and military terms with a corporate memory going back over 25 years, plus the knowledge bought in by BT technicians, long distance drivers etc. Simply put if you gave the old style TA a single role (which is what the cold war meant) they would become very good at it...if you needed a unit that could do several jobs then you needed regulars.
 
Don't forget 'local knowledge' works both ways. The kind of people who end up in the TAs are also the kind of people who were bullied at school, and are now working security at Morrisons. They're not respected, liked, or feared, and I suspect that after the first altercation on their own door stop would stop attending any drill nights.
You just described yourself in that paragraph and you weren't even a STAB
 
The regular reserves were a joke....a few rolled up for a camp with my TA signals squadron one year, but needed a complete rekit the SQMS was a mix of annoyed as he had better things to do during a mobex, and delighted as they were handing in stuff he'd never seen before, like anklets, and pre-DPM combats, which the regimental museum was after.

At one brigade study period the officer in charge of the notional 2000+ RSignals RRs admitted that they hadn't a clue where most of them were. what kit they had or even if they'd show up on QO2. He certainly didn't like the obvious next question which was why, in that case, were they counted into the orbat.

On local knowledge it's not just a case of living there but of doing the same military job year in, year out. We knew our AOR very well in civilian and military terms with a corporate memory going back over 25 years, plus the knowledge bought in by BT technicians, long distance drivers etc. Simply put if you gave the old style TA a single role (which is what the cold war meant) they would become very good at it...if you needed a unit that could do several jobs then you needed regulars.
The link to BT used to be a useful one when BT was a useful company. Now it is the telecoms equivalent of Sports Direct, but with worse customer service and a solid track record of failure.

Not sure I would want anything from current day BT anywhere near the Corps.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
The link to BT used to be a useful one when BT was a useful company. Now it is the telecoms equivalent of Sports Direct, but with worse customer service and a solid track record of failure.

Not sure I would want anything from current day BT anywhere near the Corps.
Sadly I am talking of the old days when a tech sgt spent his tour in Bosnia sorting out the local exchange. Made a good team with the local ATO as between them they knew which wire went where and what should/shouldn't be there.
 
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