Swiss referendum on firearms

#1
The Swiss have voted by a majority of 64% to accept the Federal government's recommendation to go along with the EC wish to restrict the private use of semi-automatic weapons.

The Swiss shooting clubs who opposed this move have a membership of 130,000 with only 60,000 active shooters. The effect of this decision is that those who wish to buy or possess a full-calibre semi-automatic rifle must be members of a shooting club and must shoot regularly. They must have the equivalent of a FAC.


Military weapons held by reservists are unaffected as are hunting firearms.


The referendum committee in Switzerland have, however, recognised that the EC will, in accordance with Article 17 of the EC guidance, review this regulation. They are clear that an absolute ban on semi-auto firearms and the introduction of psychological/medical test for firearm ownership is the EC long term aim. In which case a further referendum will be required.


The Swiss have traded away another little bit of their sovereignty for the advantages of Schengen/Dublin. The legislation has still got to get through the Parliament and there are not a few representatives against it. There are reckoned to be 2.5 million firearms in private hands but the use of firearms in criminal acts continues to fall. In 1996 there were 454 killings using firearms (397 of which were suicides); twenty years, 2016, later there were 239 (212 suicides). Most firearms are held for hunting or personal protection reasons.


There is little internal campaigning against the private ownership of firearms. This has been a EC initiative. Two parties including the Greens have the policy of "Fewer weapons means less weapon misuse" but on their initiative an internal Swiss referendum in 2011 to massively restrict private firearm ownership was comprehensively defeated.


The commentary in general is that the Swiss have decided that the conveniences of Schengen/Dublin arrangements are more important to the average voter but they have done it with considerable reluctance.
 
#2
All done under the guise of "protecting the public" when the real reason is & always has been, social control.
 
#3
The question is, would the EU actually kick the Swiss out of Schengen if they say stuff your Firearms Directive?
Schengen is a holy cow to the EU, which means they would be loath to do anything to harm it. Apart from which the neighbouring countries would be just a bit upset at having to re-introduce border controls, they have neither the money nor the staff.
 
#4
All done under the guise of "protecting the public" when the real reason is & always has been, social control.
It gets better. The Swiss requested access to a EU anti-terrorism data base, request denied as they're not EU.
 
#5
All done under the guise of "protecting the public" when the real reason is & always has been, social control.
That's true but if push comes to shove the Swiss can be pretty bloody-minded and with half the households having a firearm they are unlikely to go along with that form of social control. They don't have a firearms problem.
 
#6
I think it‘s almost worth it to see the outburst of butthurt amongst Septics.

The number of internet gun nuts complaining about the results, in a country most of them probably couldn’t point out on a map if their lives depended on it, is truly staggering.

Apparently its all part of the New World Order. Black helichoppers and tinfoil hats all round.

Ain‘t democracy a bitch...
 
#7
The question is, would the EU actually kick the Swiss out of Schengen if they say stuff your Firearms Directive?
Schengen is a holy cow to the EU, which means they would be loath to do anything to harm it. Apart from which the neighbouring countries would be just a bit upset at having to re-introduce border controls, they have neither the money nor the staff.
have a word with PMTM, please
 
#8
I think it‘s almost worth it to see the outburst of butthurt amongst Septics.

The number of internet gun nuts complaining about the results, in a country most of them probably couldn’t point out on a map if their lives depended on it, is truly staggering.

Apparently its all part of the New World Order. Black helichoppers and tinfoil hats all round.

Ain‘t democracy a bitch...
Just so we are clear, exactly who is an "internet gun nut" in your lexicon.
 
#9
Just so we are clear, exactly who is an "internet gun nut" in your lexicon.
„In my lexicon“ it would be someone who is monothematically obsessed with gun ownership, views all issues through the narrow lense of gun rights, to the exclusion of all other factors, and uses the internet to espouse their point of view.

Why, what did you understand me to mean? :)

Or did you actually want me to list them all, by name?
 
#10
„In my lexicon“ it would be someone who is monothematically obsessed with gun ownership, views all issues through the narrow lense of gun rights, to the exclusion of all other factors, and uses the internet to espouse their point of view.

Why, what did you understand me to mean? :)

Or did you actually want me to list them all, by name?
As I had anticipated. You paint with a very broad pejorative brush. We will thus agree to disagree.
 
#13
That's true but if push comes to shove the Swiss can be pretty bloody-minded and with half the households having a firearm
But no ammunition...

"In December 2007, the Swiss Federal Council decided that the distribution of ammunition to soldiers would stop and that previously issued ammo would be returned. By March 2011, more than 99% of the ammo has been received. Only 2,000 specialist militia members (who protect airports and other sites of particular sensitivity) are permitted to keep their military-issued ammunition at home. The rest of the militia get their ammunition from their military armory in the event of an emergency.[2][24][25] "

Gun laws in Switzerland - Wikipedia
 
#14
That's true but if push comes to shove the Swiss can be pretty bloody-minded and with half the households having a firearm they are unlikely to go along with that form of social control. They don't have a firearms problem.
Indeed, they have an EU social control problem.
 
#15
But no ammunition...

"In December 2007, the Swiss Federal Council decided that the distribution of ammunition to soldiers would stop and that previously issued ammo would be returned. By March 2011, more than 99% of the ammo has been received. Only 2,000 specialist militia members (who protect airports and other sites of particular sensitivity) are permitted to keep their military-issued ammunition at home. The rest of the militia get their ammunition from their military armory in the event of an emergency.[2][24][25] "

Gun laws in Switzerland - Wikipedia
I'm sure every other round was expended during training & those unexpected poor scores during range days were due to a hangover or summink. How else could one explain the missing holes in the targets?

1whistle.gif
 
#16
#17
I'm sure every other round was expended during training & those unexpected poor scores during range days were due to a hangover or summink. How else could one explain the missing holes in the targets?

View attachment 393895
Yeah, I’d imagine most have got a couple of buckshees knocking around. Out of interest, what sort of penalties do Swiss courts hand out for illegally held ammunition? @stoatman maybe you can help here?
 
#18
You think it's likely that the Swiss would hoard illegal ammunition at home in a country where a woman was fined 150 quid for leaving her garbage out on the wrong day :mrgreen:

Woman fined 190 Swiss francs for putting rubbish out on wrong day
Yes because anyone doing so isn't going to keep it where a local government snoop can see it, like right outside the home.
We cleared a house & by the time we'd finished, we had discovered several hundred rounds of ammunition over & above what the (recently) deceased occupant was supposed to have - stashed in all kinds of places.
It happens & it's idiotic laws that cause it to happen.
 
#20
On the EU relationship with Switzerland, this paper is from 2013. Clearly more "alignment" has occurred since then and the EU wants a new framework to replace the bilateral agreements that are currently in place. This can make sense from an EU business perspective but the Swiss need to be sure that they are not giving away aspects of sovereignty. Although it's tempting to think that this gun regulation is another attempt by the EU to harmonise aspects of Switzerland in a push for integration, (which it may be), New Zealand isn't in the EU either. *
Link to EU Observer article below.
1558313676386.png

Paper attached for convenience. Link to source:
(PDF) Do the Swiss not want to join the European Union? Swiss referenda on European integration

What you need to know about the new draft Swiss–EU deal

EU gives Switzerland another six months for a deal
Those six months are nearly up.

* NZ does not have an FTA with the EU yet but hopes to agree one.
European Union | New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade
 

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