"Surplus" uniform/ bad optics, or good business?

Dont throw your uniforms away in an active warzone is not the same as someone flogging their SF legging at a car boot sale in the UK.
Just the one? That should make finding the one-legged miscreant seller a lot easier.
 

longhair

Old-Salt
Some uniform is classified as ACTO - ...
Thanks for that - makes perfect sense in the context where I first encountered the protective regard with regard to some uniform and accessories ...even a utility pouch caused problems because of the pattern not being generally available.

Having searched on the term, and read the JSP docs I understand the rationale.
 
As an aside, when I joined in 2001 and before OPs Telic and Herrick kicked off, none of my issued kit had a union flag patch on the sleeve and to have one was an indicator that the wearer had served on ops abroad. After a while, the sheer quantity of deployments presumably made it cheaper for them to be (badly) sewn on by the manufacturer and they became the norm for everyone.
 

Union Jack

War Hero
As an aside, when I joined in 2001 and before OPs Telic and Herrick kicked off, none of my issued kit had a union flag patch on the sleeve and to have one was an indicator that the wearer had served on ops abroad. After a while, the sheer quantity of deployments presumably made it cheaper for them to be (badly) sewn on by the manufacturer and they became the norm for everyone.
Not dissimilar to the way in which law enforcement officers in the USA wear national patches despite never moving outside their patch (pun intended), especially with chiefs of police and sheriffs all seeming to qualify for four stars...:rolleyes:

Jack
 
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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
As an aside, when I joined in 2001 and before OPs Telic and Herrick kicked off, none of my issued kit had a union flag patch on the sleeve and to have one was an indicator that the wearer had served on ops abroad. After a while, the sheer quantity of deployments presumably made it cheaper for them to be (badly) sewn on by the manufacturer and they became the norm for everyone.
Union flags began I think, in the AMF(L) and other permanently NATO-assigned units. I arrived in a squadron assigned to Log Sp Bn AMF(L) in 1980 and received nametag, AMF(L) badge and union flag, all to be sewn on personally or by a tailor. Generally only worn on the wooly pully as I recall, nametags went on combat jackets too. Later, ARRC was the same.

The jackets and smocks coming from the store with union flag already applied began in the noughties I think.
 

Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
My view is informed by the way that, as a non-serving civvy, I would be required to dress appropriately whilst on base, and would be allocated kit which bore no unit/rank insignia - only a name tag could be applied.

This would appear to be based on some reason as to why you’re being given kit to wear and therefore not wearing things in a way that you would be impersonating what you aren’t

Serving soldiers are to wear the appropriate badges of their corp/unit and/or as per their qualifications.
There are various rules as to some combinations, and may need to take things off on change of unit or may be improperly dressed if they remove others

As a civilian there are (virtually) no rules, though as a civilian who works at Army HQ and has also worked on other sites I’ve not needed to be dressed in any uniform
 

longhair

Old-Salt
Complete with how many others were already on the balcony before 'Legs' got there?
Should Legs visit Australia there's a spare waiting in The Fat Lady's Arms...
Das_Boot-B.jpeg
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
This RFD originates from a Post with a photo in Current Affairs - Russian Troop Movements Reported Near Ukraine, in which a recovered combatants body was pictured, found wearing an article of uniform with a sewn (but not OEM?) Union Flag patch, and a Royal Marine Commando shoulder patch.

My personal view is that this is a "bad thing". Both sides could use this to impute a particular country's support, to cause difficulties for any diplomatic activity, or to enrage one faction or another.

The most likely origin of this piece of kit was that it was on the surplus market, and bought by a privateer, contractor or volunteer quite legally. Somebody engaged, and killed, in the Rus/Ukr conflict can't really be accusing of walting around,
and no doubt hoped that it was good kit. Certainly it was a once in a lifetime purchase ...

Some nations have very strict rules about the removal of all patches/slides/TRFs name tags and subsequent destruction of recognisable national uniform.

My view is informed by the way that, as a non-serving civvy, I would be required to dress appropriately whilst on base, and would be allocated kit which bore no unit/rank insignia - only a name tag could be applied. Very protective of what the insignia stood for indeed, so I find it strange that items can be disposed of with such little care.

It is of course possible that the jacket was worn by the original issuee - should insignia have been removed?

( FAO @Nemesis44UK and any others who might have a view )

Whilst I see your point - an uninformed Russki might think that Royal Marine Commandos have invaded and could be seen as a propaganda win to display a corpse with a British insignia on, I feel it is unlikely to have Putin stabbing the Big Red Button in outrage. Who knows with the vodka-brained bastard Russians?

I think that the bastard Russkis are probably more upset at the artillery pieces we are sending the Ukes, rather than a patch on an otherwise nondescript uniform.
 
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This RFD originates from a Post with a photo in Current Affairs - Russian Troop Movements Reported Near Ukraine, in which a recovered combatants body was pictured, found wearing an article of uniform with a sewn (but not OEM?) Union Flag patch, and a Royal Marine Commando shoulder patch.

My personal view is that this is a "bad thing". Both sides could use this to impute a particular country's support, to cause difficulties for any diplomatic activity, or to enrage one faction or another.

The most likely origin of this piece of kit was that it was on the surplus market, and bought by a privateer, contractor or volunteer quite legally. Somebody engaged, and killed, in the Rus/Ukr conflict can't really be accusing of walting around,
and no doubt hoped that it was good kit. Certainly it was a once in a lifetime purchase ...

Some nations have very strict rules about the removal of all patches/slides/TRFs name tags and subsequent destruction of recognisable national uniform.

My view is informed by the way that, as a non-serving civvy, I would be required to dress appropriately whilst on base, and would be allocated kit which bore no unit/rank insignia - only a name tag could be applied. Very protective of what the insignia stood for indeed, so I find it strange that items can be disposed of with such little care.

It is of course possible that the jacket was worn by the original issuee - should insignia have been removed?

( FAO @Nemesis44UK and any others who might have a view )
There are innumerable sellers on umpteen worldwide websites that will embroider badges to order, any design you want.
 
Not dissimilar to the way in which law enforcement officers in the USA wear national patches despite never moving outside their patch (pun intended), especially with chiefs of police and sheriffs all seeming to qualify for four stars...:rolleyes:

Jack

Meh. I will clarify a tad.

State police officers will wear their State arm patches for whichever department they are in - ie. State Trooper, or fish and wildlife, there are also some others.

Local county sheriffs deputies will wear their county sheriffs office patch.

Local city police departments will wear their city police department patch.

They pretty much all wear the stars and stripes above their department patches on both sleeves to indicate their pride in being an American.

As to sheriffs and police chiefs wearing stars on their collars, or epaulettes. The local county Sheriff being the senior law enforcement official in a county gets to wear the most stars, usually 4. Then the various city police chiefs in that county wear less stars, usually 2, or 3.

Strangely though, the top cop in Texarrse, the head of the state police uniformed arm, is only a Colonel..............go figure.

@Sam The Bam , having had a full state police career, may have some more light to shed on this.
 
I don't think he appreciated all the angry phone calls, understandable really.
Well if you phone the number of the van because you need a plumber and he doesn't turn up, I can see why you would be angry.

That's the thing with pron, it gives women an unrealistic expectation about plumbers - both their looks and their availability...
 

RaiderBoat

On ROPS
On ROPs
Meh. I will clarify a tad.

State police officers will wear their State arm patches for whichever department they are in - ie. State Trooper, or fish and wildlife, there are also some others.

Local county sheriffs deputies will wear their county sheriffs office patch.

Local city police departments will wear their city police department patch.

They pretty much all wear the stars and stripes above their department patches on both sleeves to indicate their pride in being an American.

As to sheriffs and police chiefs wearing stars on their collars, or epaulettes. The local county Sheriff being the senior law enforcement official in a county gets to wear the most stars, usually 4. Then the various city police chiefs in that county wear less stars, usually 2, or 3.

Strangely though, the top cop in Texarrse, the head of the state police uniformed arm, is only a Colonel..............go figure.

@Sam The Bam , having had a full state police career, may have some more light to shed on this.
You are pretty much 100%.

US flag patches aren’t worn much in CA. We tend to wear our agency ones on both arms. Some have the flag above the right pocket, others on right sleeve in place of agency patch. It depends on the agency head.
CoPs usually wear one to four stars depending on how big their dept is.
Sheriff is usually four stars. I have seen a five star though, BIG Dept.

LAPD still doesn’t wear sleeve patches except for Motors. Which is actually a violation of CA state legislation…but they are their own entity.

And by the way @Union Jack, in CA, and most Western states, cops have full jurisdiction within the ENTIRE state. I can cite, arrest, investigate anywhere in CA. I don’t need permission from anyone. The reason we wear an agency patch is to show our employing agency and who we serve. It’s also state law.

It’s like you wearing your GayScouts pride patch. That tells us what Poofter Patrol you belong to.

Thus endeth the lesson.
 
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