Super Puma ditches in North Sea

#1
A quick heads up for those with folk in the Oil Rig industry.

BBC Scotland newsflash just issued - sorry no linky.

Apparently on its way to the rigs NE of Scotland and no doubt carrying workers and crew.

Sorry for the bad news.
 
#4
Bugger. Sounds like it was within the 500m exclusion zone but the nearest onsite vessel had divers down at the time.
 
#6
fairy_nuff said:
BBCnews24 - all rescued amazingly enough well done RAF
Phew!! :D Fcukin freezin in that pond.

[Note to add] Most of the divers, para-medics & landing controllers in the North Sea are all ex-services, so there'll be quite a few toasts to the search 'n rescue teams tonight!!
 
#9
fairy_nuff said:
BBCnews24 - all rescued amazingly enough well done RAF
Well that's a relief and no mistake. But aren't them things supposed to be able to float and then sort of drive along on the surface?

MsG
 
#10
Bugsy said:
fairy_nuff said:
BBCnews24 - all rescued amazingly enough well done RAF
Well that's a relief and no mistake. But aren't them things supposed to be able to float and then sort of drive along on the surface?

MsG
I know Sea Kings can do this, not so sure about Pumas...
 
#11
Bugsy said:
But aren't them things supposed to be able to float and then sort of drive along on the surface?

MsG

Err...... simply put - No.

They do have flotation devices for just this kind of incident though.
 
#12
Puma no - Sea king yes
Depends how it went down. If the engines packed up and they auto-rotated in, it would be a bit tricky landing and no power to "drive" the helo as it were.
If it went down under power - eg something happens to an engine and the pilot thinks the best option is a controlled landing on water asap, then what you have described is possible.
Good drills all round and chuffed to hear all are safe !

- b*gger, beaten to the keyboard !
 
#13
Excellent news. I'm never too keen to get on the chopper to go to work, doesn't really bother me on the way home though.
Sounds as if it was an infield cab did the rescue
 
#14
The guys would have been wearing survival suits, lifejackets and a rebreather system which gives them extra time underwater. Suppose this justifies the survival course and safety briefings
 
#15
RAF done nothing more than put a Nimrod over the scene, it was all over by the time the yellow helly got there, most of the guys rescued by rig lifeboat and one of the heli's on the nearest platform. A mate of mine is on the rig the rescue chopper was from, just had the story from his other half.

A great majority of Bond's gound crews and engineers are ex crab though. I expect some puckering in Aberdeen tonight until they find out the cause.
 
#16
I'm supposed to be away on the weekend think I'll put this in the back of my mind as my last run home was the worst flight ever in 16 yrs , bloody thing was all over the sky ......... they were lucky sod's this evening at this time of year but well done to all who assisted in the rescue.
 
#17
vandyke said:
The guys would have been wearing survival suits, lifejackets and a rebreather system which gives them extra time underwater. Suppose this justifies the survival course and safety briefings
With it been the private gas companies they are going to have all this kit as mandatory for the flight, and as proved today rightly so. No doubt everybody wearing this kit has saved their lives.
 
#18
Im happy everyone survived, but on the other hand, not too happy that a heli went down.

Fills me with dread for my next trip!

Probably too early, but anyone know why it ditched?
 
#19
"A great majority of Bond's gound crews and engineers are ex crab though. I expect some puckering in Aberdeen tonight until they find out the cause."

Puckering of the lips of the arrse is normal in cases like this.
You don't want to be around when you have deed bodies, most people can't even look mates in the eye, it really gets that bad.
The Chief Pilot Bond Aberdeen is a well known and highly respected ex Army pilot. His men will be well trained as this incident has shown.
Well done the Aircrew a Good Show of why we still have Pilots and not robots flying aircraft.
john
Old spanner bender & CAA licensed engineer.
 
#20
Sodding hell have you seen the distance on that little map on the BBC, a little further than just off-shore. :)
 

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