Sunday mirror: Burnt Stafford talks to mirror reporter.

#1
http://www.sundaymirror.co.uk/news/...objectid=18008644&siteid=62484-name_page.html


EXCLUSIVE THE SQUADDIE TORCHED BY AN IRAQI MOB I was on fire and knew I'd die if I didn't get out ..now I long to go back I've got scars all over ..but this tattoo shows my spirit is unbroken
By Rupert Hamer Defence Correspondent
HIS chest, hands, arms and legs are horrifically scarred. But Private Karl Hinett insists his mind is untouched by the day an Iraqi mob turned him into a human fireball.

"That's why I got 'unscarred' tattooed across my stomach," says Karl. "Although I was injured I wasn't damaged mentally by what happened to me.

"I don't have bad dreams or flashbacks. I never woke up screaming in hospital like the doctors said I might. It just didn't affect me like that."

It is just over a year since the mob attacked gunner Karl's Warrior armoured vehicle during an ugly riot in Basra.

More on mirror link . . . .
 
#4
Excellent coverage. Lots to think about with PTSD, potentially coming to bits us on the arrse as more file through TELIC.
 
#5
Karl and I were at Headley court on the peter long ward at the same time. He is a bright and fun lad to be with who took everything as it came. It was really hard to belive he was so young as he put a few of us older lads to shame, a cracking sense of humour and a dirty mind when it came to the nurses or after a few beers down Leatherhead or Epsom.

A brave chap indeed!
 
#6
Good man.

Ref. PTSD - or rather his lack of it - why is the Mirror of all rags the first one I've seen to show a soldier who isn't a "victim"?

You know, I attended this talk by an Iraq War veteran who joined Iraq Veterans Against the War while still in theatre. That man's earned his right to speak, but it disgusted me how he portrayed himself and other soldiers as victims. That man is a school teacher in his early 50's. He got called up with the National Guard and spent his entire tour in a large camp managing stag duty rotations.
Now he has PTSD, apparently. His wife says she breaks into tears every time she sees road kill because it reminds her of her husband's time in Iraq. A family of hysterics. And the media and liberal elite just love them to bits.

It came to me that this man should have never volunteered in the first place, and now he's playing the card Vietnam veterans learned to play in the 80's: if you're not a baby killer, than you're a victim. Why does every combat veteran have to have PTSD in the eyes of the media? The Boston Globe just today had a lead article about a soldier who tried to commit suicide. What about the hundreds of thousands who didn't? What about the millions of WW2 vets who came back and got on with it. Sure, we've all got demons to deal with, but most of us have the strength to get over it. Or am I the only one who thinks like this?

Anyway, back on topic, Pte Hinett is obviously an example of Britain's finest.
 
#7
Apropos PTSD though, I remember some years ago (1999 or 2000?) Soldier Magazine had an article on a Korea vet who ended up in a POW camp.

When he returned home, he ended up knocking on people's doors in the middle of the night, because his job in the camp had been to facilitate reveille or something look that. Anyway, the chap would spend many nights in a cell after the police came to pick him up and put him there to come to his senses. Anyone remember that story and the gentleman's name?
 
B

Brandt

Guest
#8
cheesypoptart said:
Why does every combat veteran have to have PTSD in the eyes of the media? The Boston Globe just today had a lead article about a soldier who tried to commit suicide. What about the hundreds of thousands who didn't? What about the millions of WW2 vets who came back and got on with it. Sure, we've all got demons to deal with, but most of us have the strength to get over it. Or am I the only one who thinks like this?
quote]

The bloke you write about sounds like an A Grade pumper. Also, I agree that the media love anything that will 'spice up' their reports. But don't confuse people trying to pull the wool with people who do have problems. Most people who experience combat are affected by it. Fortunately decompression, either organised or just going out on the lash with your friends, does solve most of these problems. However, for some, they need more help. In my expeirence, this later category includes some of the best soldiers I have come across.

You said "most of us have the strength to get over it". It's not about strength. Most of us have 'the strength' to get over a stubbed toe or a shaving cut, but not many seem to have the strength to deal with a broken leg without medical help. It is the same. It is old- fashioned attitudes like yours that mean soldiers that need help- who can be easily be treated and fixed- don't, and as a result the problems get worse.
 
#9
I'm amazed that the Mirror has something positive to say about the troops. Makes a change.
 
#10
Brandt said:
It is old- fashioned attitudes like yours that mean soldiers that need help- who can be easily be treated and fixed- don't, and as a result the problems get worse.
Whoa, hold up there. I'm not saying "stiff upper lip, old chap" is the best course of action. Those who need treatment still aren't getting it enough. My statement was about those who are more borderline, who could end up perfectly fine or out of order depending on how they digest their experiences.

What I am worried about is the broader social implication that's very apparent to me in the US: soldiers are positively encouraged by the media and psychiatric community to see themselves as "damaged". "Damaged". That's the word that anti-war veteran used every other sentence.
Soldiers shouldn't feel awkward because they don't experience post-traumatic stress. I've come across dozens of soldiers in the UK and US who've reacted that way and wonder whether they're normal human beings because the weren't traumatized by the horrors of war. There's that cultural expectation.

I agree with the decompression. The Germans have a very excellent system in place. We've spent far too little time and money on that, and I believe we've woken up to it. Much still left to improve, I'm sure.
 
B

Brandt

Guest
#11
cheesypoptart said:
What I am worried about is the broader social implication that's very apparent to me in the US: soldiers are positively encouraged by the media and psychiatric community to see themselves as "damaged". "Damaged". That's the word that anti-war veteran used every other sentence.
quote]

It seems very different in here in the UK- there is no expectation of PTSD within the troops returning in my experience, and there is still a taboo which we are trying hard to break down- hence my sensitivity.
 
#12
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/west_midlands/6100748.stm

Iraq fire soldier hopes to return



Pte Karl Hinett said he felt "quite guilty" at not returning to Iraq
A soldier who was set on fire by an Iraqi mob has said he wants to return to the region with his regiment.
Pte Karl Hinett, from Tipton, West Midlands, spoke of the pain he suffered when his Warrior tank caught fire.

More than a year on the 19-year-old still needs regular treatment for the injuries he suffered in September 2005.

But he said what he wanted was to rejoin his friends in the Staffordshire Regiment who have recently returned to the war-torn country.

"In the army is where I want to see my future. Hopefully I can get back quite soon amongst my friends," he said.

I managed to get out and when I did get out I blacked out.... The pain came later

Pte Karl Hinett


Pte Hinett said he felt "quite guilty" about not returning with his battalion who returned to Basra just over one week ago.

"I wish I was going back with them," he said.

Images of Pte Hinett jumping from his tank engulfed in flames became a disturbing image of British soldiers' attempt to restore calm in Basra at the time.

He recalled the moment when the vehicle caught fire.


Pte Hinett still receives regular treatment more than a year on


"At first I was overwhelmed with panic. I managed to get a grip on myself, I heard my commander say over the radio keep calm, this was while he was on fire himself," he said.

"I managed to get out and when I did get out I blacked out. Next thing I was aware of I was being stretchered away. The pain came later."

He said he was treated at the scene while a helicopter was scrambled.

"That took roughly 10 or 15 minutes. That 10 or 15 minutes hurt."

In the past 13 months Pte Hinett has had skins grafts and had the word "unscarred" tattooed on his stomach to prove his spirit is not broken.

"What's most affected is my hands," he continued. "Obviously my arms, my legs, my face have been burnt but my arms and legs can function quite well, it is my hands that have really suffered the most damage.

"The physio I'm having is helping sort that out."

Pte Hinett said he had been promised a job back in battalion as soon as he is passed fit.
 
#13
HERO'S 26-MILE BATTLE
Burned soldier vows to run London Marathon
Exclusive by Rupert Hamer Defence Correspondent
HEROIC Private Karl Hinett who survived being turned into a human fireball by an Iraqi mob is to run the London marathon.

The courageous squaddie wants to raise money for the war veterans who helped him and his family cope after his horrific ordeal.





To sponsor Karl in the London marathon, go to www.bmycharity.com/karlhinett.


He said: "I was really touched that these soldiers from previous conflicts took so much trouble to help me and my family.

"I'm doing the marathon for them, to give something back."

More at link below . . . .


http://www.sundaymirror.co.uk/news/tm_headline=hero-s-26-mile-battle&method=full&objectid=18046796&siteid=62484-name_page.html
 

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