Suicide Bombing in South East Iran

rampant

LE
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#1
Suicide attack on Iran mosque kills several: minister - Yahoo! News

Suicide attack on Iran mosque kills several: minister



AFP/Graphic – A map locating Zahedan. Two explosions outside a Shiite mosque in mainly Sunni southeastern Iran killed …


by Farhad Pouladi Farhad Pouladi – 1 hr 29 mins ago

TEHRAN (AFP) – A suicide bombing against a Shiite mosque in heavily Sunni southeast Iran killed or wounded several worshippers on Thursday, Iran's Fars news agency quoted the deputy interior minister as saying.
The attack took place in the Jamia mosque in the restive city of Zahedan, capital of Sistan-Baluchestan province, when worshippers were celebrating the birth anniversary of revered Shiite Imam Hussein, the report said.
"Hours ago, a suicide operation was carried out in the Jamia mosque which left several martyrs and several wounded," Ali Abdollahi was quoted as saying by Fars.
"We do not have the exact number of casualties from this suicide operation, but for sure several have been martyred and wounded."
Zahedan member of parliament Hossein Ali Shahriari told Fars that there were two suicide attacks one after another, with the first one carried out by a bomber dressed as a woman.
"The attacker, dressed in women's clothing, was trying to get in the mosque, but was prevented" when the first blast took place, Shahriari said.
"When people came to rescue those hit in that blast, another bomber blew himself up. Three to four have been killed at least in the first attack."
State news agency IRNA said two explosions rocked Zahedan, the first striking around 9:20 pm (1650 GMT), followed by another.
IRNA quoted provincial security official Jalal Sayah as saying that an investigation was on and "details could not be given" at this stage.
"We cannot announce the number of martyrs and wounded yet," he said, adding that rescue and medical workers were on the scene.
Zahedan has been repeatedly hit by attacks blamed on Sunni rebel group Jundallah (Soldiers of God), which plays on feelings of resentment among ethnic Baluchis in the province and whose leader Abdolmalek Rigi was hanged on June 20 after he was captured in a dramatic operation by Iranian agents.
Soon after his death, the group vowed to avenge his execution.
Jundallah has carried out several deadly attacks in Sistan-Baluchestan, including on the elite Revolutionary Guards.
The group says it has been fighting for nearly a decade to secure rights for Sunni Baluchis who form a significant proportion of the population in the province.
The group claimed a suicide bombing last October that killed at least 42 people, including seven Revolutionary Guards commanders, in the town of Pisheen in Sistan-Baluchestan.
Jundallah also claimed a May 28, 2009 bombing against a Shiite mosque in Zahedan, in which more than 20 people were killed and 50 wounded.
That attack came in the run-up to Iran's hotly disputed June 12, 2009 presidential election, which saw incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad secure a second term.

Jundallah is also accused of a 2007 attack which killed 13 Guards.
Analysts estimate that the group was formed somewhere between 2000-2003 and now has about 1,000 militants trained in small arms and explosives.
In recent years the Iranian authorities have resorted to increasingly tough measures against the group. In July 2009, they hanged 13 of its members in a mass prison execution, terming them "enemies of God" after convicting them of a string of offences, including kidnapping foreigners.

At least 21 killed in Iran suicide attack: report


37 mins ago
TEHRAN (Reuters) – At least 21 people, including members of the elite Revolutionary Guards, were killed and 100 wounded in suicide attack at a Shi'ite mosque in the southeast Iranian city of Zahedan on Thursday, Iranian media reported.
No group immediately claimed responsibility for the two suicide bombings in front of Zahedan's Grand Mosque, although a lawmaker said he believed the Sunni rebel group Jundollah was behind the attack.
"In the two explosions in Zahedan more than 20 people were killed and over 100 were injured," Fariborz Rashedi, head of the emergency unit at Sistan-Baluchestan province told IRNA.
It later quoted Zahedan prosecutor Mohammad Marzieh as saying that 21 people had died.
Iran's deputy Interior Minister said "a number of Iran's Revolutionary Guards were killed and injured," the semi-official Fars news agency reported.
Zahedan's MP Hoseinali Shahriari told Fars that he believed Sunni rebel group Jundollah was behind the explosions.
Iran hanged Jundollah's leader, Abdolmalek Rigi, last month for his involvement in earlier deadly attacks in Iran.
Predominantly Shi'ite Muslim Iran arrested Rigi in February, four months after his Jundollah group claimed a bombing which killed dozens of people, including 15 members of the Guards. It was the deadliest attack in Iran since the 1980s.
Zahedan is the capital of Sistan-Baluchestan province which shares a border with Pakistan. The province faces serious security problems and there are frequent clashes between police and drug dealers and bandits.
In May 2009, a suicide bomber killed 30 people and wounded more than 120 in an attack on a mosque in Zahedan.
Jundollah is an insurgent group that says it is fighting for the rights of Iran's Sunni Muslim minority.
Iran grapples with ethnic and religious tension in the southeastern province of Sistan-Baluchestan where authorities have responded to attacks by Sunni rebels with a spate of hangings. Rights groups and the West have condemned the hangings.
Iran says the Sunni group has links to Sunni Islamist al Qaeda and in the past has accused Pakistan, Britain and the United States of backing Jundollah to create instability in southeast Iran. The three countries have denied this.
(Writing by Parisa Hafezi, Editing by Myra MacDonald)

Internicene squabbling ongoing not really surprising Sunnis & Shiites have been a loggerheads for years. Family feaus always last longest.
 
#2
RIP.

I find it hard to believe that a Muslim would bomb a mosque. Perhaps they were looking for the toilet but got lost because of their face coverings (see thread in Naafi bar).
 

rampant

LE
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Book Reviewer
#4
There have been several bombings of mosques in the last 20 odd years, Iraq certainly, with both Sunni and Shiites attacking each others Places of Worship, Pakistan is another, just the other week a Sufi Mosque was hit by Deobandist Taliban.

It goes to highlight the fact that the fundies are not interested in the Umma, but rather in their narrow interpretation of Islam, they want to dominate it their way, the vibrant pluralism of Islam runs contrary to their own ideology. It's important that more people know about this because it shows up the rampant hypocrisy of the organisations that claim to be fighting on behalf of Muslims all over the world. Their propaganda is at odds with their aims, not surprisingly.

Does anyone benefit, God No. Unless you are deluded and want to spread death and mayhem.
 
#6
Yeah I'm sure these lot were just off for a quick pray before getting back to training the Taliban/AQ, as they all do, those shifty Iranians.

Take a look at this, if you follow the links into specific years you'll see how concerned the average suicide bomber is with the attacking the west. They would much rather attack each other. I don't have figures, but I would not be at all surprised if the majority of people ever killed by suicide bombs were Muslims. And Mosques seem to be a much more popular target than any government buildings.
 
#7
RIP.

About as antagonistic as you can get - who benefits from this?
Well it may well be thought to serve our interests
and after our recent history including Fallujah II its not like we've exactly treated the Mosque as hallowed ground ourselves.

The Qods chaps quick capture of and hanging of Rigi was a major reverse for our not very covert ops. It looks like they dealt with their "Osama" with little more than a few shouty phone calls.

This is probably what's left of his network up an running, perhaps with external assistance. This may be deeply unwise but that's what we have Langley for.
 
#9
'the elite Revolutionary Guards' It was these charmers I was enjoying the demise of, and who have been caught doing various naughty things in Iraq as well as Lebanon. I've no doubt that the bulk of the deaths from Muslim suicide bombers are fellow Muslim civilians as they are far easier to get to and kill in greater numbers just as the PIRA/UVF preferred to blow up pubs.
 

rampant

LE
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#10
The story continues



Iran accuses US and UK of supporting group behind mosque attacks

CIA denies claims it has been backing Jundullah, the Sunni separatist group which has claimed responsibility for the bombs

Ian Black Friday 16 July 2010

The aftermath of the suicide bombings in Zahedan, Iran. A Sunni separatist group has claimed responsbility. Photograph: AP
Iran is vowing to hunt down a Sunni separatist group which claimed responsibility for a double suicide bombing that killed 28 people at a mosque in the south-eastern city of Zahedan.
Jundullah – Arabic for "the soldiers of God" – said it carried out the twin attacks yesterday at Zahedan's grand mosque in retaliation for the execution of the group's captured leader. Provincial officials said a further 167 people were injured, some of them critically. Three days of mourning were declared. General Hossein Salami, deputy commander of Iran's Revolutionary Guards, claimed in Tehran today that the victims "were martyred by the hands of mercenaries of the US and UK". Ali Mohammad Azad, governor of Sistan-Baluchestan province, blamed "the intelligence services of arrogant powers."
The US and Britain – which are at odds with Iran over its controversial nuclear programme – issued statements condemning the attacks.
Shia worshippers were celebrating the birthday of the prophet Muhammad's grandson Hussein when the first bomb detonated, according to reports from the scene. A second explosion took place 15 minutes later as people rushed to help – a technique used by Sunni groups in Iraq to maximise casualties. The dead reportedly included several Revolutionary Guards.
Iranian media said the aim was to sow discord between Shias and Sunnis in the Sunni majority area, which borders on Pakistan. Zahedan, the capital of Sistan-Baluchestan, has seen several mass casualty attacks in recent years.
In a message sent to al-Arabiyya TV, Jundullah said its intention was to avenge the hanging of Abdulmalik Rigi, the group's leader, in June, after he was captured in Pakistan and extradited to Iran. Rigi's brother Abdelhamid was also executed. Jundullah's website showed pictures of two suicide bombers. They were identified as Mohammad and Mujahid Rigi, apparently members of the leader's clan.
Press-TV, Iran's English-language state broadcaster, alleged that "hardline Wahabis and Salafis trained by the CIA in Pakistan" were behind the bombings. Iran has claimed Rigi confessed that the US had assured him of unlimited aid and funding for the waging an insurgency against the Islamic republic. The US is reported to have a programme of covert operations inside Iran but the CIA has denied backing Jundullah. But Alaeddin Borujerdi, chairman of Iran's parliamentary commission on national security, immediately pointed the finger at the intelligence services of the US, Israel and other western countries. "Such terror operations will not deter Iranian's resolve in fighting against arrogant powers," he told the Irna news agency. Iran was "the main victim" of US-sponsored terrorism, said Heshmatollah Falahatpisheh, another MP.
Official commentators suggested an effort to divert attention from the case of the Iranian scientist Sharhram Amiri, allegedly abducted by the CIA in its quest for the secrets of Iran's nuclear programme but who was allowed to return home on Thursday.

Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, condemned the explosions and expressed condolences to relatives of the victims. "This attack, along with the recent attacks in Uganda, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Algeria, underscores the global community's need to work together to combat terrorist organisations that threaten the lives of innocent civilians all around the world," she said.
Alistair Burt, the foreign office minister for the Middle East, also condemned the atrocity. "In targeting a busy mosque, the bombers claimed the lives of peaceful worshippers and passers by," he said. "Our thoughts are with the families of those who have lost their lives so far, and the many more injured."
[video=youtube;EMb398Lpuvw]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EMb398Lpuvw&feature=player_embedded[/video]

[video=youtube;s5AW6RMSm2Y]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5AW6RMSm2Y&feature=player_embedded[/video]
 

rampant

LE
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#12
In the sense that all terrorist movements a precusors of the ones that follow: Prince's Gate was the Democratic Movement for the Liberation of Arabistan - a region in the West of Iran, they were also a secular Marxist movement:



the guys behind this attack, Jundallah (Jundallah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) are rooted in Sunnism, and based outr Balochistan.
 
#13
In the sense that all terrorist movements a precusors of the ones that follow: Prince's Gate was the Democratic Movement for the Liberation of Arabistan - a region in the West of Iran, they were also a secular Marxist movement:



the guys behind this attack, Jundallah (Jundallah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ) are rooted in Sunnism, and based outr Balochistan.
Thanks for that "rampant", a fount of knowledge as usual!
I remember years ago being on a very long train jouney from N. Rhodesia to Cape Town (5 days & 4 nights), where one of my travelling companions was an elderly gentleman who had spent nearly 50 years in the Sudan, Somaliland & Uganda in the Colonial service! One of the things he was quite certain of was that because of the large number of schisms in the Islamic world, Sunni, Shiite, etc, and the intense dislike of each other, there would never be a unified Islamic movement!
 

rampant

LE
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Book Reviewer
#14
Thanks for that "rampant", a fount of knowledge as usual!
I remember years ago being on a very long train jouney from N. Rhodesia to Cape Town (5 days & 4 nights), where one of my travelling companions was an elderly gentleman who had spent nearly 50 years in the Sudan, Somaliland & Uganda in the Colonial service! One of the things he was quite certain of was that because of the large number of schisms in the Islamic world, Sunni, Shiite, etc, and the intense dislike of each other, there would never be a unified Islamic movement!

Your friend is right, an analogy of the current crisis in Islam could be drawn with are own European Wars of Religion, (read the excellent novel Q - Luther Blisset, which gives you an idea of the schismatic nature of reinterpretaing faith in terms of conflict): What is extremely difficult for us to see or indeed how it is far too often portrayed in the Media, is beyond the idea of Islam as a monolithic block, it plays into the hands of the fear mongers on our side and the progangandists amongst the fundies - one monolithic bloc against the other. It distorts the lines and the truth, ah Churchill was right on that one.

How many British youths of Pakistani Sufi descent would be willing to give their lives for the teachings of the rigid Deobandists and Wahabists if they really knew that what these guys really wanted would be the scrubbing of all those subscribed to the gentler visions of Islam from the face of the earth.

edited to add: what is your opinion on Somaliland's drive for independence since 1991 from the the morass that is greater Somalia: personally I feel their "democracy" with Islamic roots should be given International Recognition, we should look to our own, they were once family afterall.
 
#15
Simple. Put an end to all religion, shoot all protagonists of any form of worship.
Religion was/is just a form of control over the uneducated masses.
 
#16
Simple. Put an end to all religion, shoot all protagonists of any form of worship.
Religion was/is just a form of control over the uneducated masses.
Yes, your comment was simple. It was also genocidal and enacting it would put the efforts of Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot in the shade. You want to add your name to the Big List?

While you may be right (I agree that religion is a means of control), unfortunately we have to let the prols have their pseudo-comfort now that it's been around a while.
 
#18
"rampant", quote "what is your opinion on Somaliland's drive for independence since 1991 from the the morass that is greater Somalia: personally I feel their "democracy" with Islamic roots should be given International Recognition, we should look to our own, they were once family afterall."
I have to admit a lot of ignorance Re. Somaliland, I know we had a colony there as did the Italians & the French (who I believe still have a Foreign Legion unit in Djibouti)!
I probably feel that the UK should not get involved in any potential flashpoints there, You only have to look at the recent bombings in Uganda to see the potential for yet another Islamic backlash (Uganda supply the peacekeeping force in parts of Somalia)!
If we got involved, one group or another would just accuse us of being "colonialist" and of "telling them what to do"!
I am afraid that all of these African States insisted on their "freedom/independence" long before they had sufficiently trained populations and now seek to blame all their ills (corruption, civil strife, collapsing infrasructure etc) on their former colonial masters rather on themselves for being corrupt, inefficient, promiscuous & sometimes just lazy!
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#19
Damn your spoiling my plans to get the pink bits back.

Joke, I feel we should recognise it, Somalia is a busted flush, and Somaliland has down pretty well for herself since 1991 in comparison to the rest of the reason. The main international blockers on the issue seem to be Egypt, Turkey and the idiotic idea to maintain Greater Somalia by the AU and UN, based on the assertion that the colonial boundaries must not be redrawn. Which in this case I find patently ridiculous. Same would go for the Sudan, which we ruled as two seperate entities, north & south: the Colonial Administrators were against the creation of the Greater Sudan as we see it today, but it was London that imposed it. Would that the CAs won the day wold we have the mess that we see in Darfur today.


Check the new link in my sig block btw, first article now up for you to download, I couldn't mail it 'cos it was too large
 
#20
Yes, your comment was simple. It was also genocidal and enacting it would put the efforts of Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot in the shade. You want to add your name to the Big List?

While you may be right (I agree that religion is a means of control), unfortunately we have to let the prols have their pseudo-comfort now that it's been around a while.
You are wrong with regard to the Big List. All it requires is the abolition of teaching of schism(s). Or to be more gentle, promote atheism with the same vigour that is applied to different faiths, starting at school.
 

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