Suggestion for one stop advice page

#1
Just read this news article on the Beeb and had a quick trawl on Arrse/ Arrsepedia to see if there was anything we (as a military community) could do to make things easier for familes/ service personnel to get the right advice quickly and easily.

Clearly there is a great deal of fantastic work done by many and a great deal of help out there if you can find it but, the news report and my quick (and I stress quick) search would indicate, there is very little/ if anything to act as a one stop shop for those in need.

I do not have the skills or knowledge but perhaps someone on here could write an Arrsepedia entry with a simplified 'flow chart' to make help an injured serviceman/ woman or their family member find the right help quickly and easily.

Just a thought and, if it has already been done I appologise for my lack of searching skills - although, that in itself might highlight an issue of the highlighting of the page/ post on its own.
 
#2
The trouble with this ultimate "One Stop" approach is that each and every person in difficulty approaches their search for advice and help differently.

How many's first port of call would be Arrsepedia?

Some might do an Arrse/Google search using the terms appropriate to their particular problem.

Some might look through Arrse's "Charities and WELFARE" forum stickies (which look pretty helpful):

http://www.arrse.co.uk/Forums/viewforum/f=39.html

Some might decide to ask the nice folks in their Garrison's HIVE/Welfare Office.
 
#3
oldcolt said:
Just read this news article on the Beeb and had a quick trawl on Arrse/ Arrsepedia to see if there was anything we (as a military community) could do to make things easier for familes/ service personnel to get the right advice quickly and easily.
Great suggestion, we can then rely less on VO's and simply let the family take their advice from Arrsepedia :?
 
#4
Cryptotermes said:
oldcolt said:
Just read this news article on the Beeb and had a quick trawl on Arrse/ Arrsepedia to see if there was anything we (as a military community) could do to make things easier for familes/ service personnel to get the right advice quickly and easily.
Great suggestion, we can then rely less on VO's and simply let the family take their advice from Arrsepedia :?
I think you have misunderstood me. What I am suggesting is that a flow chart/ web page is created so that those in need can be directed to the right VO/ VOs as appropriate. Each VO could then add a link to that chart from their website if they so wished.

Eg. A family clicks onto the RBL site or direct from the Rear Party Forum etc and is asked a series of questions as to the nature of the injury/ loss and the help they believe they may require. The flow chart uses the input to asses which charity/ ies would be best place to help and what help could be offered (including additional help that the family may not have thought was available). This system could be as simple or as complex as someone wants to make it. It is not intended to replace the VOs, far from it, it is there to ensure the family/ servicepersonnel are able to find the right advice/ help more quickly. :)
 
#5
There is no one-stop-shop because there is no one-stop-solution, you can't advise a soldier in BFC/BFG to call their local council/CAB/whatever.

VO = Visiting Officer.
 
#6
Cryptotermes said:
There is no one-stop-shop because there is no one-stop-solution, you can't advise a soldier in BFC/BFG to call their local council/CAB/whatever.

VO = Visiting Officer.
My bad, I assumed it meant voluntary organisation/s :oops:

As for the one stop solution, that is my point. A well written flow chart/ website would allow anyone accessing it to be given clear guidance on what is available and from whom :)
 
#8
Can I volunteer to do the web stuff and graphics, will buy a domain name and host the site but will need some input on content

Sounds like a good idea but my only concern would be keeping it up top date, the last thing it would need is to give people who are in the most need and probably at a serious low point in their lives duff information

My hat is in the ring
 
#9
#11
Why would the bereaved family of serviceman turn to a website for help? There is a dedicated national and in some cases (F&C) international hub of CNOs and CVOs. They've all received training in it and are, in my opinion, a fantastic service to the families and something which the MoD has got right for a change. The very fact that some of you don't even know what a Visiting Officer is speaks volumes. Leave it to the professionals.
 
#12
All great sites ladies and gents but not very user friendly; especially so if one considers who will be most likely to use it and the frame of mind they may be in (parent/ wife etc worried about sons injury/ money worries etc).

the idea is to take all the information from those sites/ charities and put them into/ onto a single web based flow chart that takes information from the user and channels the user to the right charity/ ies along with a list of the help available. If someone with a bit of IT whizz could figure it out, the charities could update the information themselves/ upload the changes to the webmaster.

edited to add: 5a,appreciate what you are saying but, if you read the BBC article you will see that a great many families would not know and DO NOT know what a VO is or where to start looking for help; which is what prompted my post. I hope to be off to afghan soon and my family wouldn't have a clue where to look if anything shouldhappen to me.
 
#13
5A, agree to some degree but one thing we do come across is people who are out of the system or lost contact for example and don't quite know where to turn to given some routes will have changed dramatically

One would think that the service personnel and veterans agency would be able to pull the various avenues of support and guidance together but their website is not that strong although they do have a freephone advice number on 0800 169 2277

The problem with advice is that unless you are immersed in it as you say, it becomes out of date.

I think a simple portal that just advised people in an easy to access format what avenues they could take themselves might be useful, acting like a funnel to the correct source of advice and support rather than dispensing duplicate and potentially out of date information
 
#14
meridian said:
5A, agree to some degree but one thing we do come across is people who are out of the system or lost contact for example and don't quite know where to turn to given some routes will have changed dramatically

One would think that the service personnel and veterans agency would be able to pull the various avenues of support and guidance together but their website is not that strong although they do have a freephone advice number on 0800 169 2277

The problem with advice is that unless you are immersed in it as you say, it becomes out of date.

I think a simple portal that just advised people in an easy to access format what avenues they could take themselves might be useful, acting like a funnel to the correct source of advice and support rather than dispensing duplicate and potentially out of date information
What he said! :)
 
#15
FiveAlpha said:
Why would the bereaved family of serviceman turn to a website for help? There is a dedicated national and in some cases (F&C) international hub of CNOs and CVOs. They've all received training in it and are, in my opinion, a fantastic service to the families and something which the MoD has got right for a change. The very fact that some of you don't even know what a Visiting Officer is speaks volumes. Leave it to the professionals.
I believe what's being ask for is a "single stop" for sign posting people with an enquiry....! Not to give advice but just sign post...
 
#16
hitback said:
FiveAlpha said:
Why would the bereaved family of serviceman turn to a website for help? There is a dedicated national and in some cases (F&C) international hub of CNOs and CVOs. They've all received training in it and are, in my opinion, a fantastic service to the families and something which the MoD has got right for a change. The very fact that some of you don't even know what a Visiting Officer is speaks volumes. Leave it to the professionals.
I believe what's being ask for is a "single stop" for sign posting people with an enquiry....! Not to give advice but just sign post...
By George he's got it! :D
 
#17
oldcolt said:
edited to add: 5a,appreciate what you are saying but, if you read the BBC article you will see that a great many families would not know and DO NOT know what a VO is or where to start looking for help; which is what prompted my post. I hope to be off to afghan soon and my family wouldn't have a clue where to look if anything shouldhappen to me.
If a serviceman is killed or wounded, on active service or not, a CNO will be dispatched within an hour, aiming to inform the NOK within a further hour. From then on, after the bad news has been delivered, a CVO will take over, literally, the NOKs lives. He will sort out insurances, repatriation trips or hospital visits, money,funeral arrangements - everything. Most military families don't know what a CNO/CVO is until they get that dreaded knock.

For to say 'your family wouldn't have a clue where to look' is a pointless statement as when it does happen - they don't need to know. It's all done.
 
#19
FiveAlpha said:
oldcolt said:
edited to add: 5a,appreciate what you are saying but, if you read the BBC article you will see that a great many families would not know and DO NOT know what a VO is or where to start looking for help; which is what prompted my post. I hope to be off to afghan soon and my family wouldn't have a clue where to look if anything shouldhappen to me.
If a serviceman is killed or wounded, on active service or not, a CNO will be dispatched within an hour, aiming to inform the NOK within a further hour. From then on, after the bad news has been delivered, a CVO will take over, literally, the NOKs lives. He will sort out insurances, repatriation trips or hospital visits, money,funeral arrangements - everything. Most military families don't know what a CNO/CVO is until they get that dreaded knock.

For to say 'your family wouldn't have a clue where to look' is a pointless statement as when it does happen - they don't need to know. It's all done.
With respect, that may well be true in many cases but there appear to be a significant number of people who are falling through this net; surely a system to help those must be a good thing?
 
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