Suffolk Oak doing the splits.

Chaps,
Some advice if I may?
This great big lump of Suffolk oak was cut for me a few years back.

Came from a huge log shipped up here following Mr Fish's storm that never was going to happen.
Anyhow, it was not seasoned which it now certainly has....a bit too well.
I will belt sand it, and then treat it with Barrettine preserver.
But, these cracks? They are pretty much done with it, have not grown in a couple of years.
Either I hammer some fillets in of seasoned scrap, then use what to fill it?
Or, just fill it...with what? Not found anything Googley that hits the button.
I suppose I could rake the sharp edges off and just leave it...but...SWMBO.....
Ideas & experience would be very much appreciated.
Cost £350.00 at the time. Took 3 guys to lift it!
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Resin is quite popular, especially in a contrast colour
 

napier

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
1591194714571.png
 
LED's in resin can look good, although you'll be illuminating peoples bums
 
A long drill
Lengths of 12 - 15mm steel stud
Washers and nuts
Super-dooper wood glue

Drill through the board. Counterbore deep enough to recess the washers/nuts.

Super-dooper glue in the gap. Clamp up tight with the stud and nuts. Make sure the ends of the studs are in the recess to avoid slashed legs.
 
I'm very disappointed here, when I saw the thread title I rather hoped that Suffolk Oak was the name of a new super model or porn star (not much difference between the two jobs I grant you)
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Resin is quite popular, especially in a contrast colour
Resin is popular these days for River Tables (aka The Mullet of the Woodworking World) as as an outdoor piece I wouldn't recommend it. The ex ansiin and contraction the wood will undergo across the year will cause the resin to crack and fall apart.

If you can find someone with a planer thicknesser get it faced edged and squared all round ( or simply faced and thicknesses if you want to keep a curve to the edges) and fit Dovetail keys along the cracks in a similar or contrasting wood.

e1ec700eaab5b9b76b3b3ec4f1e20205.jpg
 
Last edited:
A long drill
Lengths of 12 - 15mm steel stud
Washers and nuts
Super-dooper wood glue

Drill through the board. Counterbore deep enough to recess the washers/nuts.

Super-dooper glue in the gap. Clamp up tight with the stud and nuts. Make sure the ends of the studs are in the recess to avoid slashed legs.
This but cut plugs to hide the nuts and use stainless steel. Stagger the studding vertically and surround them with resin to prevent warping. More resin to fill the splits, tighten the nuts before the resin cures to ensure the splits are fully filled.

When it's time to consign it to the AGA/woodburner, don't forget to remove the metalwork before sawing.
 
Drill it, cut to length and fit some metal stud in it, recess the washers and nuts and plug the holes. Repeat maybe four or five times. Resin the cracks to prevent further water ingress.

Get a sander on it to clean it right up all over and then stain it and a few coats of varnish on it. You end up with it looking like it is now but clean, tidy, strengthened and weatherproof.

It’s a very practical garden feature to sit on and a very unique piece to look at!
 

Oyibo

LE
For inspiration:

1591284986162.png
 
Right chaps.
Many thanks for responses.
We've our 1st class joiner coming in a few days to floor the loft. I showed him the task.
He has all the tools & skills to tackle the bolt & squeeze solution...in fact he's going to enjoy doing it just for shits & giggles.
I can easily tackle the sanding & preservation bit.
 
Find someone with a proper big table saw (like a Delta 12/14, Powermatic 72 or Wadkin PK). Rip cut down the middle, so you get two pieces. User a planer/jointer to cut all the cracked shite out on both inner faces, leaving you with perfectly smooth inner faces. Glue and clamp back up. As @BareGrills suggests, you could reinforce the joint with threaded rod, nuts and washers. Strictly speaking that’s not necessary, the glue (something like Titebond III) will be stronger than the wood, but inset rods would resist any residual tendency to warp.

A large-format radial arm saw would also make the rip cut. You could also do it with a chainsaw, but it would need a rip chain, or even a big enough bandsaw would do it. In all cases, sufficient support would be required either side of the tool. A couple of cheap roller stands would suffice. Just about any jointer should deal with the inner faces. A decent cabinet shop, boat builder or even some museums should have the machine tools.

The only ball ache would be physically lugging it about.
 

giatttt

Old-Salt
Put some reeds in the cracks and rejoice at the melodious notes when people sitting on the bench fart?
 

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