Suffering Fraud in the USA

#1
We normally suffer some form of credit card fraud resulting in a change of card's about twice a year. However, we've just come across a couple of new scams, both over the last few day's.

1. The car insurer wrote out saying that they would not continue with, what is effectively, out excess insurance cover as we are obviously accident prone bad risks.

We looked over the detailed accidents and, nope, weren't us, we didn't do it. Understand, in the US the injured party contacts the insurer of the person responsible for the accident and need not necessarily contact their own insurer. We had two cases showing on our record of accidents that have been claimed against our insurance. Never at any time were we asked about, or informed of a claim being made. Smell's a bit.

Long chat on the phone and it is being investigated. My own suspicion is, seeing as no correspondence was exchanged, that a member of the insurers staff has been fiddling the policy's. Consider that most claims will be in excess of $1000, multiply that by 1000 fiddles over a few months and they have trousered a cool $million.

There is always a way that a clever admin in the right job can fiddle the account's and/or policy's. The Mrs in her banking career has seen it three time's: Once at the mortgage division of a bank where people were writing off family and friends mortgages; the second time where a team infiltrated a bank call centre and managed to harvest enough client information to make small payments (all under a fiver) to their accounts, the total ran to millions; the third time was at the credit card operation of a bank where similar to the mortgage division people were writing off friends and family debt.

The upshot, that the insurance company have not twigged to yet, is that we will be getting a refund from them. They have based our premiums for the last 3 years since these 'accidents' happened on our family accident record.

2. The second scam is precious. The daughter is in the UK at university, yesterday we received a bill for the first installment of the 3 iPhone 10's she apparently bought and took away from the store (in Dallas) last weekend.

we noticed that her name had been slightly mis-spelt on the bill. We called Verizon, went through to the fraud department and laid it out. The young lady started on with how the daughter would have to call it in as it was relating to her. I tried to remain calm as I ripped her a new one, pointing out my daughter is in the UK, 6 hour time difference and she certainly is not going to pay international call charges to listen to elevator music while she is waiting in a queue - and if that was not a convincing argument then I would happily call the regulator's office to point out that they had given someone credit against my daughters name when an inaccurate spelling of her name was presented for credit checking.

We managed to get out of the girl that it had been a face to face transaction, in store, ID had been presented (presumably a fake driving licence) and the individual had signed up and walked out with 3 iPhone 10's.

We also managed to get an email saying that the daughter has no responsibility for the account.



You can't let anyone near your ID in the US - I refuse to give my social security number to anyone. The only people who could have perpetrated the ID scam with access to all her details are: the driving licence people; her old college here in the US; her old employer here in the US. It only needs one dodgy member of staff............my money is on the driving licence people.
 
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#2
Stuff like this makes me wonder how often employers who go tïts up or aren’t very ethical in the first place, sell off employees personal details after they close up shop....
 
#3
Far too much info, floating around to very dodgy destinations........

After a few peaceful weeks, the scum are up and running again........0091, 0087, 0065, 00135....... just today.

They are taking the piss out of the phone companies, who don't seem to care less.
 
#4
Once, and once only, I made the dire mistake of ordering a watch online from the States for Ned Junior using my credit card. Roll forward a year or so and my UK bank phoned to ask whether I had I really just bought several grand’s worth of wedding attire in nowhereville Texas. Needless to say, I had not and I did not pay for that particular transaction.
 
#5
Once, and once only, I made the dire mistake of ordering a watch online from the States for Ned Junior using my credit card. Roll forward a year or so and my UK bank phoned to ask whether I had I really just bought several grand’s worth of wedding attire in nowhereville Texas. Needless to say, I had not and I did not pay for that particular transaction.
We have an auto notification for any and every credit card purchase of greater than $1. SOP for scammers is to go do a small test purchase first before they go and buy the big stuff. We used to have the alert set at $10 and then one got through so it was dropped to $1.

Far too much info, floating around to very dodgy destinations........

After a few peaceful weeks, the scum are up and running again........0091, 0087, 0065, 00135....... just today.

They are taking the piss out of the phone companies, who don't seem to care less.
What irk's me with this phone scam is that the phones will be active. They could ping them to within 5 yards on the GPS and then using handhelds go and smile in the face of the person. Do they? No! They need to start slapping these people, HARD. If I were running their fraud team I would have an active recovery department made up of former bouncers and American football players.

The scams have not cost us any money but, the time taken up probably amounts to a good 6 or 7 hours chasing people and phone calls.
 

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