Success rate of applicants

Discussion in 'Join the Army - Regular Officer Recruiting' started by chrismcc, Jan 17, 2011.

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  1. Hey folks!

    I am new to this site and joined as I am considering joining the army as an officer. Whilst I am really excited about the prospect of joining, I am very unsure as to what my chances are and what I am up against.

    I am looking to start training in about 18 months time (as I need to finish my forensic psychology degree). I was wondering how many people apply and how many people are actually accepted onto the training at Sandhurst? I did ask the army recruitment centre but they were unable to give the information.

    I am also concerned that I don't have a military background; I currently work in HIV and Sexual Health. I have always worked during my degree and have had a variety of jobs: assistant psychologist, research assistant, clinical database administrator to name a few. I also teach in a school for 1 day a week - I teach the aimhigher programme and increase participation into HE.

    Also, I don't intend to stay in the army for a very long time. I intend to serve about 5 years then leave to do my clinical psychology doctorate.

    Any advice and answers to my questions would be welcomed.
     
  2. None of that should be a problem, in fact the extra curricula experience should help if anything. Intending only to stay for 3 or so years will not effect your chances in the least.

    Potential army officers are (in theory) assessed against a fixed standard of performance on AOSB. This means that you are not in direct competition with your peers. In short your chances of getting in are entirely down to you.
     
  3. I am new to this site and joined as I am considering joining the army as an officer. Whilst I am really excited about the prospect of joining, I am very unsure as to what my chances are and what I am up against.

    Why are you "unsure" just make a decision to apply and get stuck in.



    I am looking to start training in about 18 months time (as I need to finish my forensic psychology degree). I was wondering how many people apply and how many people are actually accepted onto the training at Sandhurst? I did ask the army recruitment centre but they were unable to give the information.

    What difference would it make? If I told you a million apply? So what? I would strongly recommend you get training immediately, why would you delay? Your degree does not take up every single hour of the week, if your not able to handle a degree and some training at the same time you will struggle immensely at Sandhurst



    I am also concerned that I don't have a military background; I currently work in HIV and Sexual Health. I have always worked during my degree and have had a variety of jobs: assistant psychologist, research assistant, clinical database administrator to name a few. I also teach in a school for 1 day a week - I teach the aimhigher programme and increase participation into HE.

    Anything is helpful but I promise letters on a paper saying you have done stuff will not get you very far, the tests are designed to expose who you are as a person, so you could get a first and have done every extra curricular activity there is, but if you cannot climb a wall or work as a team in the command tasks you wont get anywhere.


    Also, I don't intend to stay in the army for a very long time. I intend to serve about 5 years then leave to do my clinical psychology doctorate.

    Might be a bit of a problem since your potentially going to go to war for your country and "humm I just want to do it for a bit" does not sound like your very determined or fully invested in the military, yet of course plenty of people do just do their short service commission.



    All in all I would approach your application like this. There are subjective parts, these are things you can change, your physical fitness, your math skills ect..... Then there are objective things, your military background, which degree you have already started ect.... these you cannot change so put them out of your mind and focus on the subjective stuff.
     
  4. Even though it's irrelevant, Having seen a slide today on the breakdown of AOSB Main Board passes, based on those who get a particular category at briefing it's something like this (from memory):

    Cat 1: 66%
    Cat 2: 45%
    Cat 3: 25%

    Now, what proportion get which category I can't recall, but if you use a bit of google-fu you can find a Westbury newsletter which details that breakdown.

    Edit: Because I'm nice, it's this: http://www.army.mod.uk/documents/general/AOSB_External_Newsletter_Oct_09.pdf

    In any case, all of that is irrelevant - you're not accepted on a roll of an appropriately weighted statistical die, you're accepted on your performance throughout the selection process. Good luck!

    Regards,
    James.
     
  5. If you want to pursue clinical psychology, and I'm sure you're aware of how competitive it is to get onto that, surely you'd be be better using those five years gaining clinical experience?

    Also, I'm not sure if it would be picked up on interviews, but your experience so far reads like somebody who is keen to get into clinical, so you might have to defend your change of aspirations.
     
  6. I come from a reasonably successful academic research background, and it certainly does get picked up at interview. Every single one I've had (ACA, Westbury, fam. visits). That doesn't make it a bad thing, but you must be prepared for it and be able to articulate why you want to change, and why to the Army. It has caused me no problems, indeed I've found my background has made me memorable (not in a bad way, I hasten to add), which is a good thing. Would be a disadvantage if you're a throbber though...