Subterranean Travels - Stories Beneath The feet

T

Tremaine

Guest
#1
Below pavement level: wartime bunkers, installations, burial crypts, dug-up plague pits, sewers, excavated Roman walls, remnants of Henry VIII's tennis courts, poncy wine cellars, bunkers, London, and forgotten corners of the Tube. Ghost stations unused since the 1930's, "fluffers " that used to clean the Underground of all its hair, discarded wallets, and nail clippings...

Having read a couple of books on underground Britain, I won't be joining the SubBrits. But those dark underground passage-ways, and forgotten histories, are fascinating. Just the London Tube for instance....

One of those threads that can flourish, or crash, or have its secrets heavily edited. :wink: Worth a punt?
 
#2
I once read a book called 'Beneath the city streets' by a chap called Peter Laurie.
I followed it up with a book called 'Underground London : Travels beneath the city streets' by Stephen Smith.

Absolutely fascinating stuff and a must for all Troglodytes like me.
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#3
Brighton Pavilion

http://www.culture24.org.uk/art/architecture/tra22008#contenttop

"So into the bowels of the building we descend, with its maintenance workshops and after limbering through scaffolding we find ourselves in the famous tunnel – but where does it go?

“This is the tunnel that everybody knows about,” explains Andrew. “It led from the new north end of the Pavilion to the stables and the riding house, which is currently the museum.”

“It was only used at the very end of his life, when he was keen not to appear in public, so this was a great way of getting from the Pavilion to the riding school without being seen by members of the public. But of course everybody thinks it went in another direction.”

Once upon a time this door would have allowed access to the Royal stables, it now leads to the Brighton Museum and Gallery. Richard Moss © 24 Hour Museum."
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#4
It is quite incredible the number of cities that have secret underground histories, London & Edinburgh are probably the most obvious to us here in the UK, but there exists a massive underground network in Paris, some areas are open to the public, most are not. There exist a sub-culture (pun not intended) amongst the Parisian youth who actively seek out and explore these vast catacombs. I have seen many photographs and films of the escapades of these subterranean flanneurs as they run the gauntlet with the Police.

Prague, Rome (recently featured on TV) and Istanbul are three other cities with a vast underground network, little known and little explored.
 
#5
You might get a better response for this the Mil History forum, and yes there is quite a lot of interesting Mil and non Mil underground stuff out there!
 
#7
I was told that Warren lane in Woolwich was so called because the tunnels that used to run under the Royal Arsenal converged there.
Also,
An old bloke in Aldershot told me that the area near the Military Cemetery in Aldershot was festooned with old tunnels that dated back to the 19th century.

I never found out if there was any truth in either of these rumours.
 
#11
i know turin has vaults underneath it, i also believe worcester and bristol have secrets underneath (both affiliated with king john)
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#12
saintstone said:
"There are about 40 abandoned or relocated stations on the Underground network along its entire 255 miles (408Km) of trackway - some subsurface and some above ground. Some have vanished without trace whereas others are almost intact, grimey time capsules of the era when they were closed." "Blanks", or "voids", walled off and unused.

:D
 
#13
Tremaine said:
saintstone said:
"There are about 40 abandoned or relocated stations on the Underground network along its entire 255 miles (408Km) of trackway - some subsurface and some above ground. Some have vanished without trace whereas others are almost intact, grimey time capsules of the era when they were closed." "Blanks", or "voids", walled off and unused.

:D
If you know where the stations are, you can actually see the stations if you look carefully.
 
#15
Tremaine said:
saintstone said:
"There are about 40 abandoned or relocated stations on the Underground network along its entire 255 miles (408Km) of trackway - some subsurface and some above ground. Some have vanished without trace whereas others are almost intact, grimey time capsules of the era when they were closed." "Blanks", or "voids", walled off and unused.

:D
There is one disused tube station that is used for Police, fire brigade and Ambulance service exercises (amongst others) and is regularly used for TV and film work.
For instance, the final bit of 'V for Vendetta' was filmed there.

Can't remember the bloody name of it though.
 
#17
Nick Catford of this lot:

www.subbrit.org.uk

...knows his stuff. He was also involved in the Secrets of Underground Britain series.
 
#18
my home city

"The area which now makes up Nottingham city centre was once known as Tiggua Cobaucc which means ‘Place of Caves’. The first known reference to Tiggua Cobaucc appears in The Life of King Alfred by the famous Welsh monk Asser, the Bishop of Sherborne, who visited this area around 900AD.

People in Nottingham have been living in caves like these since at least the 17th century. These caves and others locally were inhabited until 1845 when the St Mary’s Enclosure Act was passed which banned the renting of cellars and caves as homes for the poor. "

from here
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#19
bigeye said:
Nick Catford of this lot:

www.subbrit.org.uk

...knows his stuff. He was also involved in the Secrets of Underground Britain series.
Churchills' Bunker also there:
http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/d/down_street_station/index.shtml
"With the approaching hostilities in Europe a new use was soon found for Down Street when it became the headquarters of the Railway Executive Committee that had been set up at the time of the Munich crisis to prepare for the Government taking over control of main line railways, which it did under the Railway Control Order of 1939. by the War Cabinet with cabinet meetings chaired by Churchill until the new protected cabinet war room was ready."
He is said to have disliked that complex, and the tin bath (was) still there,
recently.
 
#20
Punk_trooper said:
i know turin has vaults underneath it, i also believe worcester and bristol have secrets underneath (both affiliated with king john)
I did some work experience with a structural engineers in Bristol and I remember that there was quite a big problem with putting heavy buildings on top of the Redcliffe caves, which might collapse under the weight. So someone must know where all the holes are, for purely practical purposes!
 

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