Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

It did look a bit contrived I'll admit, but that may be down to the editing too. A pity we didn't get to see the young AB who passed his exam catch his Dolphins. It doesn't always go well from what I've been told. Seeing him sew a patch on his shirt isn't quite the same.
Also the marine engineer who sorted he heads out went from hero to zero when he drove the boat.
Like this you mean....

For those that don't know, the skipper presents them in a glass of rum. The recipient is supposed to drink the rum and catch the Dolphins in his teeth.
 

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Did anyone watch tonights where they ward off a Russian sub from uk waters north of Scotland? Was that gen? It looked like an exercise, to me.
It did seem a bit gung-ho, but back in the day that's what it was like! They were pretty easy to find as they were so noisy, however, coming to PD to tell a nearby ship to ping him seems a bit weird, as surfacing to PD is a noisy evolution for the boat.
 

philc

LE
Sounds like a diesel boat. An old mucker of mine started off on diesel boats, back when the RN had them. I was told the same about the location: sea water varies immensely in temperature and salinity, and that’s your best guess at your actual location. Apparently after a while no one cares as diesel permeates everything.
When you set out provisions are stacked anywhere and everywhere. That’s normal - I got roped into weighing, packing and stacking for a crew of 23 Transatlantic sail training trip once and the food etc needed for the crew for about six weeks was immense. Lads and lasses at sea don’t suddenly go on a diet of crackers and green tea.

One of my shore drafts was ASWE (Research & Upgrades) working for a small team maintaining ships computer systems, this was mid 80s. It was a mixture of civvies and senior engineering staff from across the fleet. At the time one thing they were working on was new software to calculate how sonar would bend through water with different temperatures and salinity.

The programming was being done by Civvies, the RN not having anyone who could do the work. The Commander at the time, old school was very concerned about secrecy as all programmers were 20 somethings from Uni who all had long hair and beards, as programmers did in those days.

He was convinced they were commie hippies etc and was sending stiffly worded memos up the food chain.

No idea if they were or how he got on, it was just amusing to hear him bang on about.
 

QRK2

LE
One of my shore drafts was ASWE (Research & Upgrades) working for a small team maintaining ships computer systems, this was mid 80s. It was a mixture of civvies and senior engineering staff from across the fleet. At the time one thing they were working on was new software to calculate how sonar would bend through water with different temperatures and salinity.

The programming was being done by Civvies, the RN not having anyone who could do the work. The Commander at the time, old school was very concerned about secrecy as all programmers were 20 somethings from Uni who all had long hair and beards, as programmers did in those days.

He was convinced they were commie hippies etc and was sending stiffly worded memos up the food chain.

No idea if they were or how he got on, it was just amusing to hear him bang on about.

Presumably they were no less reliable that the impeccably short hared and clean shaven Harry Houghton ;-)

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Back in the 70s when I wuz a student, I got myself a brand new white submariner jumper as seen in the programme yesterday.

Sold it on ebay. After seeing them being worn on telly yesterday, I had a pang of regret in selling it. Sniff.
Pal of mine wore one to an Al Murray gig. Gets to asking the audience their names:
"Roy" says my mate.
" Ah, a great British name " says Al, "So why are you dressed as a f*cking U boat commander then!"
 
Pal of mine wore one to an Al Murray gig. Gets to asking the audience their names:
"Roy" says my mate.
" Ah, a great British name " says Al, "So why are you dressed as a f*cking U boat commander then!"

I was at a Pub landlord gig too, years ago now when he did small venues. Being in the front row, he asked mine. Stumped him for a moment, then quickly recovered and made a joke with it.

Great gig. Even got to be on stage with him................... ah well, that was my claim to fame.
 
One of my shore drafts was ASWE (Research & Upgrades) working for a small team maintaining ships computer systems, this was mid 80s. It was a mixture of civvies and senior engineering staff from across the fleet. At the time one thing they were working on was new software to calculate how sonar would bend through water with different temperatures and salinity.

The programming was being done by Civvies, the RN not having anyone who could do the work. The Commander at the time, old school was very concerned about secrecy as all programmers were 20 somethings from Uni who all had long hair and beards, as programmers did in those days.

He was convinced they were commie hippies etc and was sending stiffly worded memos up the food chain.

No idea if they were or how he got on, it was just amusing to hear him bang on about.
Whenever we're out on patrol, we regularly launch a 'bathy thermograph' (Google it!) which ascends, switches itself on, then tells us all sorts of information about the water column as it plummets to the sea-bed. Believe it or not, if the boat is under a 'layer' it is (almost) totally invisible to anything else not in the same layer. Think of refraction when you look at an object in water. A 'dunking' helicopter or ship with VDS (Variable Depth Sonar) will attempt to lower its sonar into the layer to try and find a boat.

More here!

 
No explanation on why they changed captains.
There's nothing unusual about it. It's quite normal for a ship to have a CO for about 18 months or so who then gets appointed elsewhere. I would expect the boat's skipper just came to the end of his time on board and was posted out to drive either a desk or another boat.
 
Enjoyable so far but very contrived and in danger of beating Vigil in a here's some shit we just made up competition. Guess it's all due to the editing but last night gave us the submarine going into Plymouth before being told it was Faslane. Best of all were the two civvy contractors who magically appeared to acid treat the heads while the boat was dived - great service that!. Random mixture of masks when the oxygen got "dangerously low". Guess its all done to ramp up the excitement factor - can only be good for recruitment etc
 
Enjoyable so far but very contrived and in danger of beating Vigil in a here's some shit we just made up competition. Guess it's all due to the editing but last night gave us the submarine going into Plymouth before being told it was Faslane. Best of all were the two civvy contractors who magically appeared to acid treat the heads while the boat was dived - great service that!. Random mixture of masks when the oxygen got "dangerously low". Guess its all done to ramp up the excitement factor - can only be good for recruitment etc
I guess the RN isn't responsible for the editing and there must be hundreds of hours of video recordings to edit. At least Ch 5 aren't doing a hatchet job on the RN like the BBC are with their 'drama'.
 
Enjoyable so far but very contrived and in danger of beating Vigil in a here's some shit we just made up competition. Guess it's all due to the editing but last night gave us the submarine going into Plymouth before being told it was Faslane. Best of all were the two civvy contractors who magically appeared to acid treat the heads while the boat was dived - great service that!. Random mixture of masks when the oxygen got "dangerously low". Guess its all done to ramp up the excitement factor - can only be good for recruitment etc
For me its still one of the best Naval documentaries since the 1976 Sailor about the old Ark Royal with big Wilf, little Wilf, Uncle Tom and his war canoe, and the star of the show - the old lady herself. Such an elegant and graceful dame.
 
It is quite hard for any TV programme to do a real justice to any of the armed forces but it does give a flavour for those that haven't served or are not exposed to what we do and it might encourage some to consider it as a future career.
 
It is quite hard for any TV programme to do a real justice to any of the armed forces but it does give a flavour for those that haven't served or are not exposed to what we do and it might encourage some to consider it as a future career.
I read somewhere today that Chris Terrill is on board HMS Queen Elizabeth with a view to make a documentary. There's a man who can show HM Forces in a light they deserve. His work is excellent in my view, and obtained an honarary Green Beret when he filmed Royal Marine training in his 50's he felt that the only way he could truly show the rigours of Royal Marine training was to go through it himself.
 

QRK2

LE
I read somewhere today that Chris Terrill is on board HMS Queen Elizabeth with a view to make a documentary. There's a man who can show HM Forces in a light they deserve. His work is excellent in my view, and obtained an honarary Green Beret when he filmed Royal Marine training in his 50's he felt that the only way he could truly show the rigours of Royal Marine training was to go through it himself.

 
I guess the RN isn't responsible for the editing and there must be hundreds of hours of video recordings to edit. At least Ch 5 aren't doing a hatchet job on the RN like the BBC are with their 'drama'.
Agreed. I was just playing the ages-old pick up on all the wrong things game (its a default setting when these documentaries come on!). This and the recent carrier ones must have had a few people heading to the careers office - don't think the same could be said for the recruits one (and pillow-casegate). Certainly confirms I wouldn't like to be a submariner !

Interesting though...I guess hell would freeze over before any filming ever took place on a v-boat?
 

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