Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

THe chap with the big ears that I mentioned in an earlier post (let's just call him Graham.....'cause that's his name)
Graham is a compulsive Knitter ( which I found a bit strange for a 73 years old ex submariner 6 foot 6 , bult like a brick shithouse with a taste for all types of alcohol especially rum) often seen on site on a lazy afternoon sitting in the sun either with his needles clicking away or a crochet hook getting red hot , when he isn't playing boulle, or out walking
His submariner jumpers are a work of art

I asked what got him into knitting he said he was also one of the boats sailmakers (? on a sub?) who else is going to sew the canvas body bags before they are ejected
He said it was something many used to do to pass away long hours of bordom he finds it now an absorbing hobby
As I said , really decent chap (wicked and sharp sense of humour)
 
Many moons ago a buddy of mine was coming back from weekend. There were a couple of baby Pongoes in the compartment and obviously they all got chatting.

On finding out he was a submariner, one baby Pongo said 'Oh, we've been told not to talk to you lot'!


One guy I knew was certifiably mental, however, he'd been seen by a psychiatrist who had passed him 'sane'. He had a letter saying as much and any time he was called a mental tw4t or similar, he'd produce his letter and wave it at you!


And finally...... we were tasked to go day running with a group of psychiatrists embarked, who were going to 'study' us at sea..... you can only begin to imagine the fun we had! We were 'briefed' by the Cox'n. At on stage the psychiatrists were all standing at the rear of the Control Room, clipboards in hand. The Control Room was unusually full of bodies too. FYI when a course change is given, it is shouted by the officer and repeated by the helmsman, as a rudder angle and course. So (in a loud clear voice 'Port 30' and everyone in the Control Room leant to the left. 'Midships' and everyone stood upright again.... and so it went on. Then they were barked at as they walked past and all manner of stuff.

I'd love to see the final report!

Dr Sheldon Cooper Walt. :)

R (1).png
 
THe chap with the big ears that I mentioned in an earlier post (let's just call him Graham.....'cause that's his name)
Graham is a compulsive Knitter ( which I found a bit strange for a 73 years old ex submariner 6 foot 6 , bult like a brick shithouse with a taste for all types of alcohol especially rum) often seen on site on a lazy afternoon sitting in the sun either with his needles clicking away or a crochet hook getting red hot , when he isn't playing boulle, or out walking
His submariner jumpers are a work of art

I asked what got him into knitting he said he was also one of the boats sailmakers (? on a sub?) who else is going to sew the canvas body bags before they are ejected
He said it was something many used to do to pass away long hours of bordom he finds it now an absorbing hobby
As I said , really decent chap (wicked and sharp sense of humour)

Yep. My dad did 23 years RN as a marine mechanical engineer so many hours on watch in control rooms/engine rooms, and could knit like the best of them but kept it hidden, preferring booze, cryptic crosswords, booze, surreptitiously making model engines in the little machine room and oh yeah, booze. (dad died at 50 courtesy of booze and blue stripe fags)
 
Last edited:

witsend

War Hero
Book Reviewer
I have a motorhoming mate who is a retired petty officer on subs
he has a pair of the biggest sticky out ears and yes , you guessed it , he was a sonar operator

good guy though
That reminds me of my first time at sea on a bomber patrol. I unfortunately had a bunk near this massively tall dabber with right angled sticky out ears. He had a problem, as in he liked to grope himself non-stop. It was his second or third patrol and the lads were getting fed up with this. They tried removing his bunk curtains to calm him down, but he just cracked on regardless.

The killick of the forends probably didn’t help things. The media entertainment was whatever radio station the skipper wanted, normally Radio 4 and the fitba results on a Saturdays. Reel to reel movies in the dinning hall with authentic ciggie smoke. And a telly and VHS player in the forends, which doubled as the junior rates mess. The killick forendy had a regular porn slot during the middle watch. I sat there for a minute or two uncomfortably before quietly slipping away. Many years later I discovered that young lady pleasuring herself with a rose was Desiree Cousteau.

There were some absolute animals onboard, and the parties. I suffered a couple of the worst hangovers in my life during those 3 months. If I ever see another tin of SV cider again it’ll be too soon.

I definitely came ashore a changed boy.
 
That reminds me of my first time at sea on a bomber patrol. I unfortunately had a bunk near this massively tall dabber with right angled sticky out ears. He had a problem, as in he liked to grope himself non-stop. It was his second or third patrol and the lads were getting fed up with this. They tried removing his bunk curtains to calm him down, but he just cracked on regardless.

The killick of the forends probably didn’t help things. The media entertainment was whatever radio station the skipper wanted, normally Radio 4 and the fitba results on a Saturdays. Reel to reel movies in the dinning hall with authentic ciggie smoke. And a telly and VHS player in the forends, which doubled as the junior rates mess. The killick forendy had a regular porn slot during the middle watch. I sat there for a minute or two uncomfortably before quietly slipping away. Many years later I discovered that young lady pleasuring herself with a rose was Desiree Cousteau.

There were some absolute animals onboard, and the parties. I suffered a couple of the worst hangovers in my life during those 3 months. If I ever see another tin of SV cider again it’ll be too soon.

I definitely came ashore a changed boy.

Desiree and Seka..... Say no more, squire. However, if one of those two couldn't make you stay.... have you had yourself checked for the ghey? Turmeric tea drinker, per chance?
 
preferring booze, cryptic crosswords, booze, ...... and oh yeah, booze.
Despite being about 10 feet as the cockroach walks from the SR's Mess, where there was copious amounts of the real stuff, my first chief used to make 'wine' in the Cab Space!

The one I had the honour to sample was worse than an Aborigine's armpit, being his 'orange and raisin' brew.
 
Slight drift but if you can get hold of a copy at a reasonable price, this book is well worth a read:

Amazon product
Joel Blamey DSC DSM, served as a submariner for 28 years from 1926, surviving over 200 depth charge attacks during the War. Not being a fan of enclosed spaces myself, I'm in awe of anyone that does this for a living!
 
Officers wear white overalls, ratings blue. I would expect the MEO/DMEO to be in ovies most of the time. The fire parties will wear their normal working uniform, not white ovies. That is the case for surface ships and I doubt it would be much different for sundodgers.
Ratings AWD coveralls used to be white at one point & FOST ratings also wear white overalls too. Plus Warrant Officers.
 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
There is another RAN O boat HMAS Ovens at the Maritine museum at Fremantle. Like you say, very cramped. The RN had a squadron of T boats stationed in Sydney until 1967. An old PC in the Met on my team had served on submarines there and in Singapore during his time in the RN.
 
Ratings AWD coveralls used to be white at one point & FOST ratings also wear white overalls too. Plus Warrant Officers.
You make a good point - As a JR I was issued white ovies when in the Adriatic off the coast of Croatia & Montenegro when it was all kicking off down that way. These were only worn when we went to action stations for real rather than as part of any training serial.
 

bob231

War Hero
You make a good point - As a JR I was issued white ovies when in the Adriatic off the coast of Croatia & Montenegro when it was all kicking off down that way. These were only worn when we went to action stations for real rather than as part of any training serial.
The distinction is coveralls - white with epaulettes and a single breast pocket - vs overalls - white or blue with two breast pockets and two thigh pockets. Coveralls as you say were war issue: I was told by FOST that it made the blood easier to spot. They were also much thicker, but that might just be because they hadn't been washed a million times.
 
The distinction is coveralls - white with epaulettes and a single breast pocket - vs overalls - white or blue with two breast pockets and two thigh pockets. Coveralls as you say were war issue: I was told by FOST that it made the blood easier to spot. They were also much thicker, but that might just be because they hadn't been washed a million times.

coveralls should be double-layer, and worn with only a t-shirt below.

That's why FOST "make" you wear overalls and another layer below during training...
 

Yokel

LE
You make a good point - As a JR I was issued white ovies when in the Adriatic off the coast of Croatia & Montenegro when it was all kicking off down that way. These were only worn when we went to action stations for real rather than as part of any training serial.

I think you are looking for the term 'action coverall'. See the BOI report into the loss of HMS Coventry in the Falklands.

The very last page mentions the need to wear as many layers as possible (it also helps protect against the Cold in the event of ending up in the water) and also recommends 'battle clothing' that is worn on top of other uniform.
 

endure

GCM
Did anyone watch tonights where they ward off a Russian sub from uk waters north of Scotland? Was that gen? It looked like an exercise, to me.
I stopped watching half way through. There was far too much Channel 5 type 'ooh the toilet's blocked' bollocks. Everyone was wandering around with masks on apart from the telly crew and camera.
 
Did anyone watch tonights where they ward off a Russian sub from uk waters north of Scotland? Was that gen? It looked like an exercise, to me.
It did look a bit contrived I'll admit, but that may be down to the editing too. A pity we didn't get to see the young AB who passed his exam catch his Dolphins. It doesn't always go well from what I've been told. Seeing him sew a patch on his shirt isn't quite the same.
Also the marine engineer who sorted he heads out went from hero to zero when he drove the boat.
 
Last edited:
It made me laugh when they asked members of the crew what they thought of the new Captain. They were hardly going to say "he's a right cnut" (if that is indeed their opinion) on camera.
 
Top