Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

I did a job on board HMS Talent during the Balkans. I will get round to watching the programme and I'm sure it will bring back pleasant memories. I enjoyed my time, found the crew professional (the skipper finished up a Two-Star) if slightly bonkers. I left an Int Corps beret as a memento in the senior rates mess (I was a Cpl at the time but the team was all POs so they bumped me up). We were on station just long enough to qualify for the Nato Bosnia medal.

As the skipper said 'There are only two types of vessels in the sea. Submarines and Targets'. He also said (as I sat on the planes control very briefly) 'Captain's Pipe - Percy is driving and may God have mercy on our souls'
 
I was at a Rugby weekend in Leamington Spa a few months ago, ended up on the lash with two former RN submariners from Northern Ireland.

Both of them as mad as a mad thing. Absolute lunatics, bloody good blokes though.
I was due for a jolly on board Astute the day after that muppet went off on one with a rifle. I was working in the docks area at the time and saw plods helicopter overhead and a great sense of foreboding came over. I could just tell the jolly was going to be fucked.
 
Back in the 70s when I wuz a student, I got myself a brand new white submariner jumper as seen in the programme yesterday.

Sold it on ebay. After seeing them being worn on telly yesterday, I had a pang of regret in selling it. Sniff.
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
A former shipmate of mine was a cook on subs. He served on O boats and said the same. Nobody noticed the smell as they all smelt the same. It's why they are known as crabmariners.

He was on one of the subs involved in the Falklands War although I can't remember which particular boat he was on.
 
I did a job on board HMS Talent during the Balkans. I will get round to watching the programme and I'm sure it will bring back pleasant memories. I enjoyed my time, found the crew professional (the skipper finished up a Two-Star) if slightly bonkers. I left an Int Corps beret as a memento in the senior rates mess (I was a Cpl at the time but the team was all POs so they bumped me up). We were on station just long enough to qualify for the Nato Bosnia medal.

As the skipper said 'There are only two types of vessels in the sea. Submarines and Targets'. He also said (as I sat on the planes control very briefly) 'Captain's Pipe - Percy is driving and may God have mercy on our souls'
I was on a boat that did a long sneaky just before it all kicked off. Surfaced in Naples bay at midnight to embark some secret squirrel Yanks wot spoke the lingo. We were transiting up and down about half a mile offshore for 8 weeks. Doesn't appear in any book, record, nada. And no effing gong either!! Very interesting how some of the intelligence was received.
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
I have to admit there are some 'strange' characters, as in any job. I served with one chap in the Submarine School who rated a full 10 on the weird scale. Not bonkers, just, well, weird.

Some years later I was outside and working in a defence related job when he breezed up for an interview. This was when one still made the effort and put a suit and tie on. Oh no, not him! Hand knitted Aran jumper! He was however early, so was offered a cuppa, which he declined, as the office (funnily enough!) didn't have any Earl Grey! In his certificates and qualification pack he was most proud of his NVQ in childcare........

During the interview, he pointed out to the Boss that the information on his wall charts was wrong, which was a pity, as we were i/c of it all!! Funnily enough he didn't get the job!
 
I was on a boat that did a long sneaky just before it all kicked off. Surfaced in Naples bay at midnight to embark some secret squirrel Yanks wot spoke the lingo. We were transiting up and down about half a mile offshore for 8 weeks. Doesn't appear in any book, record, nada. And no effing gong either!! Very interesting how some of the intelligence was received.
Once I was back I wrote to the Medal Office with the name of the op, dates sailed, on station, off station and disembarked and the gong arrived in the post a few weeks later. It might be worth you doing the same.
 
I have to admit there are some 'strange' characters, as in any job. I served with one chap in the Submarine School who rated a full 10 on the weird scale. Not bonkers, just, well, weird.

Some years later I was outside and working in a defence related job when he breezed up for an interview. This was when one still made the effort and put a suit and tie on. Oh no, not him! Hand knitted Aran jumper! He was however early, so was offered a cuppa, which he declined, as the office (funnily enough!) didn't have any Earl Grey! In his certificates and qualification pack he was most proud of his NVQ in childcare........

During the interview, he pointed out to the Boss that the information on his wall charts was wrong, which was a pity, as we were i/c of it all!! Funnily enough he didn't get the job!

Sounds very similar!

This hero got the tin tack for a multitude of sins. The last one being phoning the management & giving them a massive bollocking for their perceived failings while doing work that explicitly forbids phone use.
Last straw. Bye bye.
 
Was on HMAS Onslow in Sydney a few years ago and was struck how cramped that was (well worth a visit to the Museum by the way if you're ever down under), Trenchant seemed equally cramped but there's a lot more machinery needed of course. I found the programme very interesting, was a great insight into what Young Pvivax the elder does for a living (Sonar) although he's on an Astute Class boat which is a lot bigger. At 6' 8" his Mum and I wonder how he manages but he never complains about it. Doubt I could do it, but you have to say they earn their Submarine pay.
 
Was on HMAS Onslow in Sydney a few years ago and was struck how cramped that was (well worth a visit to the Museum by the way if you're ever down under), Trenchant seemed equally cramped but there's a lot more machinery needed of course. I found the programme very interesting, was a great insight into what Young Pvivax the elder does for a living (Sonar) although he's on an Astute Class boat which is a lot bigger. At 6' 8" his Mum and I wonder how he manages but he never complains about it. Doubt I could do it, but you have to say they earn their Submarine pay.
I had a look around HMAS Onslow when on a ship's visit to Sydney in 2001. I was with my oppo who I mentioned a couple of posts above and who'd served on one of that class. You certainly have to respect the sundodgers for serving in those conditions.
 
I noticed that when they were loading stores some of the boxes were marked “ RN spec baked beans”.

Are these a special “fartless” variety ?

I asked my pusser a similar question - apparently it’s to do with the specific weight. “RN Spec” needs to come in sizes appropriate for TriCat.
 
Watched it with herself, what came across was the cramped spaces, and the almost claustrophobic conditions that the lads have to negotiate and work in. Having to spend up to 3 months in a tin tube, no daylight, cramped conditions, and the chance, however slim, of being totaled by fire, flood, explosion, and god forbid, torpedoed and depth charged, doesn't bare thinking about. My deepest respect and admiration to all sub mariners.:salut:
Yeah, 100%.

I'm not sure if I'd have the guts to be a submariner, all that water above you - and even more below you if it all goes wrong.

Hats off to the festering, vitamin D deficient, nautical troglodytes.
 
I had a look around HMAS Onslow when on a ship's visit to Sydney in 2001. I was with my oppo who I mentioned a couple of posts above and who'd served on one of that class. You certainly have to respect the sundodgers for serving in those conditions.
There is another RAN O boat HMAS Ovens at the Maritine museum at Freemantle. Like you say, very cramped. The RN had a flotilla of O boats stationed in Sydney until 1971. An old PC in the Met on my team had served on submarines there and in Singapore during his time in the RN.
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
Sounds like a diesel boat. An old mucker of mine started off on diesel boats, back when the RN had them. I was told the same about the location: sea water varies immensely in temperature and salinity, and that’s your best guess at your actual location. Apparently after a while no one cares as diesel permeates everything.
When you set out provisions are stacked anywhere and everywhere. That’s normal - I got roped into weighing, packing and stacking for a crew of 23 Transatlantic sail training trip once and the food etc needed for the crew for about six weeks was immense. Lads and lasses at sea don’t suddenly go on a diet of crackers and green tea.
 

Goatman

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Went on the sub that's at Gosport museum many years ago. self & oppo, we're both 5'10" and oppo was a skinny bugger, 11 stone soaking wet, I was a svelte 12st7 in those days.

Other than banging my head on various stuff, my main memory is how small the bunks were. The lowest bunks were just above floor [ok, deck] level and the top ones right under the inner pressure hull.

Once in the bunk there is no way to roll over -- because there isn't space. You're in the bunk and you sleep on your back. Top bunk was the worst because of the curve of the pressure hull which meant having your nose almost against the plating. Even my skinny oppo had difficulty getting in and out of the bunks.

HMS Alliance.....Museum Director is/was Cdr Tall.

It snuggles up next to the former HMS Dolphin,latterly Fort Blockhouse, where I did my last 6 years.

The only time I visited was when they filmed one of the Transformers films there- and I was working as an extra :-D
 
Went with a few mates to see Das Boot at a German cinema when it first came.
Afterwards, all of us were profoundly glad to be CVR crewmen!
A few collegues who served on RN Nuclear Hunter Killers said that Das Boot was their favourite film. It was regarded as a training film by submariners apparently.
 
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Seen this on someone’s Instagram claiming the Queen is dead hence the pictures of her being crossed out in the background lol. Anyone got the real reason why they would be taped ?
 

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