Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

I dont know I watched 3 minutes of it, its appalling
You ONLY watched three minutes . . . then you did yourself a dis-service . . . and are hardly equipped to add anything useful to this discussion :( .



Ah! I believe @SONAR-BENDER , may have identified the reason for your disparaging remarks . . . ;) !!
?

I think you might be getting Vigil (fake) and Trenchant (real) mixed up!

The main access hatch is 28 inches across. The main passage on 2 deck is about 4 feet wide.

Are we talking a toy RC Landrover here?
 
If you have an Amazon prime account there’s a really good free tv series about 3 RN fellas and a yank on exchange getting put through the ringer on the Perisher command course.


Watch How to Command a Nuclear Submarine | Prime Video
Im a world class armchair expert, but i remember watching that and thinking that it looked hard. The time pressure looked difficult. Really good series for anyone with a passing interest imo.
 
Watched it with herself, what came across was the cramped spaces, and the almost claustrophobic conditions that the lads have to negotiate and work in. Having to spend up to 3 months in a tin tube, no daylight, cramped conditions, and the chance, however slim, of being totaled by fire, flood, explosion, and god forbid, torpedoed and depth charged, doesn't bare thinking about. My deepest respect and admiration to all sub mariners.:salut:
It's funny reading people's perceptions of life onboard! I was a volunteer - being a Jock the additional submarine pay was an incentive! ;) To be honest, never thought about any of the potentially bad outcomes....! At the time!

My last ship was an aircraft carrier and when flying, it was possible to go days or weeks without going 'outside'. Life on a boat is (generally) so structured/regimented, that you don't really notice.

At the start of say an 8 or 10 week sneaky or patrol, you DO think 'kin 'ell - 10 weeks. Everyone does a 'days to go chart'. But after 2 or 3 days and you are into your routine. Fronties do 6 on 6 off (7 to 1 and 1 to 7) the entire time, though the 6 off can be disrupted by snags, 'events' or training exercises. Back afties have to do different times to comply with nuclear safety.

We were encouraged to engage with what we were doing, to the extent that TS material was sometimes displayed to help us understand what we were doing. Anyone could walk into the Control Room and see where we were and also where 'He' was if we were in the trail. Really interesting times.
 
Spookily enough after posting the above, this post appeared on a Submariner's Face Ache site!

Just found this on the MOD website !

Engineering Technician (Weapon Engineering) (Submariner)
You’ll maintain the firepower and defensive technology of a Royal Navy submarine.
The role at a glance
Age: 16 - 39
Education: No qualifications
Salary: £20,000 The minimum you’ll earn after training
Holiday: 6 weeks of paid holiday every year
Progression: £51,000 Earn over this amount as you progress
Benefits: £5,000 For earning your ‘Dolphins’
Get Submariner pay of at least £34.00 per day at sea when fully qualified
 
I have a motorhoming mate who is a retired petty officer on subs
he has a pair of the biggest sticky out ears and yes , you guessed it , he was a sonar operator

good guy though
 
I watched it with SWMBO last night. Due to my chronic untidiness she cannot believe I was ever a sundodger! Most patrols are 'war patrols', so a full range of weapons carried. I've also said previously that boxes of tinned food used to be placed on the deck, like a vast edible laminate floor - this was used first so that the deck was cleared quickly.

My work space was called the Sonar Cabinet Space - 'cos that's where the sonar gubbins was! Anyway, one day I asked the cooks if they'd make gooseberry crumble for duff. They asked me why? Did I like gooseberry crumble?

My response was no, but I can't get the lower drawers of the cabinets out to do maintenance due to all the tins of gooseberries!

I am guessing that with the name Sonar Bender your Trade was identifying noises underwater - if so you might appreciate this True Dit

Around 1990 I am on a Project Management Team building an airport ( Stansted ).
It is a new Package of works, a new Team - though I knew some people on it from previous works there - and a new Director. Loud, brash, out to make a name for himself.
He decides at the first Team Meeting we cannot possibly build this thing without creating a Team Slogan.

"Oh, FFS ! Here we go again ...." thinks I.
Down the other end of the table I see another lad slump back in his seat, turn his eyes to the ceiling and start mumbling something inaudible.
There was something about his attitude/ appearance which said ex-military.

A while later and its coffee break. I head outside for a smoke and he is already there.
His eyes and head flicked back towards the door and muttered ****** or somesuch and I grinned in agreement.

Turned out he was ex RN and had spent his time in Submarines as a Sonar Operator.

A few weeks later, and during a few beers out comes ......
The Dit
He had completed all his training and was kicking around, waiting for his first posting to a boat.

Meanwhile an altogether different Sonar Operator is on leave from his boat, round his girlfriends house but her parents are home watching TV.
They decide it is safe to go into the cupboard under the stairs for a quick bit of passion and she created a tear in her pantyhose to enable this. In the heat of the moment, and the darkness, his erect member catches a bit of the torn nylon on its way in, receives severe lacerations to the underside of his foreskin, claret everywhere, and has to go to hospital.

At the same time all this is happening a bunch of Argentinian steel workers turn up in the South Sandwich Islands and put up a flag.

My mate suddenly gets posted sooner than expected as a replacement Sonar Operator to HMS Conqueror and heads off down South - and the rest is History.

Ping !
 
I was at a Rugby weekend in Leamington Spa a few months ago, ended up on the lash with two former RN submariners from Northern Ireland.

Both of them as mad as a mad thing. Absolute lunatics, bloody good blokes though.
 
You ONLY watched three minutes . . . then you did yourself a dis-service . . . and are hardly equipped to add anything useful to this discussion :( .



Ah! I believe @SONAR-BENDER , may have identified the reason for your disparaging remarks . . . ;) !!
I did actually I'm writing a dull report and thought he meant Vigil. Ho hum.
I too have had a trip on a T boat from Plymouth to Gibraltar as a jolly.
I'm 6"4 and the only place I could stand up straight was the torpedo shop.
Did not enjoy.
 

Check_0ne_Two

Old-Salt
Takes a certain type to be a CO of a sub and this CO didn't disappoint.

The ' bad luck ' the boat was having all pointed to training serials but the disclosure that it was just that never came. Strange,

I assumed the white overall crew members were fire parties / engineering department - this not the case ?
 
I am guessing that with the name Sonar Bender your Trade was identifying noises underwater - if so you might appreciate this True Dit


Ping !
Sonar Bender is the affectionate term used to describe the highly intelligent, handsome and debonair chaps that restore the kit to full working order when the monkeys operators have finished breaking it.
 
I was at a Rugby weekend in Leamington Spa a few months ago, ended up on the lash with two former RN submariners from Northern Ireland.

Both of them as mad as a mad thing. Absolute lunatics, bloody good blokes though.
Many moons ago a buddy of mine was coming back from weekend. There were a couple of baby Pongoes in the compartment and obviously they all got chatting.

On finding out he was a submariner, one baby Pongo said 'Oh, we've been told not to talk to you lot'!


One guy I knew was certifiably mental, however, he'd been seen by a psychiatrist who had passed him 'sane'. He had a letter saying as much and any time he was called a mental tw4t or similar, he'd produce his letter and wave it at you!


And finally...... we were tasked to go day running with a group of psychiatrists embarked, who were going to 'study' us at sea..... you can only begin to imagine the fun we had! We were 'briefed' by the Cox'n. At on stage the psychiatrists were all standing at the rear of the Control Room, clipboards in hand. The Control Room was unusually full of bodies too. FYI when a course change is given, it is shouted by the officer and repeated by the helmsman, as a rudder angle and course. So (in a loud clear voice 'Port 30' and everyone in the Control Room leant to the left. 'Midships' and everyone stood upright again.... and so it went on. Then they were barked at as they walked past and all manner of stuff.

I'd love to see the final report!
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
Went with a few mates to see Das Boot at a German cinema when it first came.
Afterwards, all of us were profoundly glad to be CVR crewmen!
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Went on the sub that's at Gosport museum many years ago. self & oppo, we're both 5'10" and oppo was a skinny bugger, 11 stone soaking wet, I was a svelte 12st7 in those days.

Other than banging my head on various stuff, my main memory is how small the bunks were. The lowest bunks were just above floor [ok, deck] level and the top ones right under the inner pressure hull.

Once in the bunk there is no way to roll over -- because there isn't space. You're in the bunk and you sleep on your back. Top bunk was the worst because of the curve of the pressure hull which meant having your nose almost against the plating. Even my skinny oppo had difficulty getting in and out of the bunks.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Just seen this - the perfect holiday for @SONAR-BENDER --


1631633539863.png
 
Spookily enough after posting the above, this post appeared on a Submariner's Face Ache site!

Just found this on the MOD website !

Engineering Technician (Weapon Engineering) (Submariner)
You’ll maintain the firepower and defensive technology of a Royal Navy submarine.
The role at a glance
Age: 16 - 39
Education: No qualifications
Salary: £20,000 The minimum you’ll earn after training
Holiday: 6 weeks of paid holiday every year
Progression: £51,000 Earn over this amount as you progress
Benefits: £5,000 For earning your ‘Dolphins’
Get Submariner pay of at least £34.00 per day at sea when fully qualified

I think, as a Pinky Faggot, if I had my time again I'd like to have gone boats for at least some of it.
 
Takes a certain type to be a CO of a sub and this CO didn't disappoint.

The ' bad luck ' the boat was having all pointed to training serials but the disclosure that it was just that never came. Strange,

I assumed the white overall crew members were fire parties / engineering department - this not the case ?

Officers wear white overalls, ratings blue. I would expect the MEO/DMEO to be in ovies most of the time. The fire parties will wear their normal working uniform, not white ovies. That is the case for surface ships and I doubt it would be much different for sundodgers.
 
I worked with a former sun dodger until he was recently ‘let go’.
He was gopping in appearance (I would’ve hated to hot bed him) & had no real idea how to get along with his colleagues. How he got on in an environment like a Sub is beyond me.

While sharing a break with him one night I asked about his service.
I’m sure he told me that in his day (he’s about early 60s now, so late 70s/80s?) that as a rating you never knew exactly where in the world you were, but could guess which sea you were in by the temperature of the boat/sea?
Was he winding me up?
He said they weren’t allowed to shower or shave for weeks as fresh water was a premium.
I’ve no idea what type he was on.

As for last nights programme, it was surprising to see just how close it was to ‘Das Boot’ in the claustrophobic atmosphere & general cramped conditions.
wasn't in Andover was he?
 

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