Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

I missed this photo earlier. Happy to see that the top secret submarine tunnel from Mambeg to Coulport has not been shown.

c19a8346-5c11-496d-b644-4305cbcb6190-jpeg.606447


Yes, there are conspiracy loons around who KNOW it exists.........

PS. I can see my sister's house in that photo! You won't be wanting photos!
When is this tunnel supposed to have been dug ? What was its supposed raison d'etre?
 
When is this tunnel supposed to have been dug ? What was its supposed raison d'etre?
Well, it's secret, innit, so I can't tell you.


However, there is a cadre of conspiraloons who are convinced the SSBNs can simply nip through this secret tunnel to load up with mushrooms at Coulport, so the Peace Camp/Moscow won't know. . As to when it was dug, well, that's another can of worms (SWIDT?) I was born and bred there and I think somebody would have noticed, even if they'd done it at night! Even in the 60s!
 
The family and descendants of the captain wouldn't like it.
Lt, Commander'Sam' Bolus had to make some unenviable choices and he had to make them quickly with.no second.chances. Either a) order immediate DSEA escape as fleet orders demanded or b) re-organise high pressure air systems and attempt a salvage blow. He weighed up his options and chose the latter. The grounds are clear
There were insufficient DSEA sets for the men involved. Only one escape chamber was operable. The boat had gone down away from shipping lines. The experience of Umpire (1941) was that even if the men were able to escape and reach the surface, they would drift apart and die of exposure.
Bolus took his decision. Four men survived but it was four more than would have survived had they resorted to DSEA escape from the outset into an empty sea.
 
Lt, Commander'Sam' Bolus had to make some unenviable choices and he had to make them quickly with.no second.chances. Either a) order immediate DSEA escape as fleet orders demanded or b) re-organise high pressure air systems and attempt a salvage blow. He weighed up his options and chose the latter. The grounds are clear
There were insufficient DSEA sets for the men involved. Only one escape chamber was operable. The boat had gone down away from shipping lines. The experience of Umpire (1941) was that even if the men were able to escape and reach the surface, they would drift apart and die of exposure.
Bolus took his decision. Four men survived but it was four more than would have survived had they resorted to DSEA escape from the outset into an empty sea.

Not quite how it would play out in a film, I'm afraid. He'd be the baddy, saving his own skin at the expense of others - - captain going down etc., the selflessness of command and so on...
 
Lt, Commander'Sam' Bolus had to make some unenviable choices and he had to make them quickly with.no second.chances. Either a) order immediate DSEA escape as fleet orders demanded or b) re-organise high pressure air systems and attempt a salvage blow. He weighed up his options and chose the latter. The grounds are clear
There were insufficient DSEA sets for the men involved. Only one escape chamber was operable. The boat had gone down away from shipping lines. The experience of Umpire (1941) was that even if the men were able to escape and reach the surface, they would drift apart and die of exposure.
Bolus took his decision. Four men survived but it was four more than would have survived had they resorted to DSEA escape from the outset into an empty sea.

One of the things that comes over well in the Evans book is the difficulty of making decisions while under great mental and physical strain, and often in circumstances where oxygen supply is reducing and compromising a person's ability to think. Add to that complications like working in darkness, or in partially-flooded compartments, and it is not surprising that some 'wrong' calls were made (I should stress that I don't mean that in a judgmental way - reading the Evans book one can see how certain decisions made sense at the time - and I am in no position to judge the actions of others). In some cases, 'right' or 'wrong' will be a matter of hindsight.
That makes events like the escape of John Capes from Perseus all the more remarkable.
 
An interesting watch. Just watching the original perisher course on you tube I first watched in the 80s. As a former infanteer hats off to submariners.
There are two more episodes in that series , called “ Ocean Safari “ , about a nuclear hunter-killer boat during a big NATO exercise, and “ Polaris “ .
 

Hairy-boab

Old-Salt
Fair point. It would be at risk of becoming an agenda - driven piece, or of the writer or director deciding to assign blame to this or that person. That's a real shame however as it is a tale worthy of telling.
If only it had been a diverse crew, using the talents of all of society? lol, I can actually imagine it!
 
There are two more episodes in that series , called “ Ocean Safari “ , about a nuclear hunter-killer boat during a big NATO exercise, and “ Polaris “ .
Just put 'RN submarines' into YouTube - loads of stuff there.

Even the BBC could have done this to get ideas for what the interior of a submarine looked like...........
 
Well if it does I wish they'd make it big enough for the entire squadron of MOD Plod, RN and RM fast cutters to use it, instead of holding a race in close formation returning to Faslane from parking something big and black and charmingly ugly in a shed, in Coulport last Tuesday . . .

With the very notable exception of the Marine's in their new Island Class boat, who though moving quickly very clearly held back until passed us before winding up to full chat. Who'd have predicted that of the three organisations, the prize for considerate seamanship would go to the Royals?

300px-Island-class_patrol_vessel.JPG


 
Not quite how it would play out in a film, I'm afraid. He'd be the baddy, saving his own skin at the expense of others - - captain going down etc., the selflessness of command and so on...
Thetis stern.jpg
 
Top