Submarine: Life Under the Waves. Channel 5 Monday 13th Sep 9pm

I asked my pusser a similar question - apparently it’s to do with the specific weight. “RN Spec” needs to come in sizes appropriate for TriCat.
Now if I just knew what TriCat was……
 
Whenever we're out on patrol, we regularly launch a 'bathy thermograph' (Google it!) which ascends, switches itself on, then tells us all sorts of information about the water column as it plummets to the sea-bed. Believe it or not, if the boat is under a 'layer' it is (almost) totally invisible to anything else not in the same layer. Think of refraction when you look at an object in water. A 'dunking' helicopter or ship with VDS (Variable Depth Sonar) will attempt to lower its sonar into the layer to try and find a boat.

More here!

Just watched the documentary on The Perisher course and one of the candidates / victims used this to great effect. Clever stuff.

I did a Command Course in a different field that was similar in that you were expected to deal with whatever came your way. There the difference ended in that ok, balls it up and it got very dangerous, very quickly but we didn’t have people actively trying to make life difficult. Enormous respect to submariners generally but those that get through The Perisher must be quite something?

On the subject of the characteristics of sea water: I did a stint in Gib and we were accommodated in HMS Rook. The bar filled up with very pale people one evening and I got chatting with them. One said that the salinity of the Med is different to that of the Atlantic. This affects water density (or was it osmosis, I was struggling with the brandy sours / technical aspects by this point). This then creates two different currents through the Straits, one deep, one shallow that flow in opposite directions. A trick for boats trying to sneak through (ISTR he mentioned the Sov Black Sea fleet routing via the Bosphorous?) was to “hang” in the relevant layer and drift through on the current?

Wind up or Gen?
 
Just watched the documentary on The Perisher course and one of the candidates / victims used this to great effect. Clever stuff.

I did a Command Course in a different field that was similar in that you were expected to deal with whatever came your way. There the difference ended in that ok, balls it up and it got very dangerous, very quickly but we didn’t have people actively trying to make life difficult. Enormous respect to submariners generally but those that get through The Perisher must be quite something?

On the subject of the characteristics of sea water: I did a stint in Gib and we were accommodated in HMS Rook. The bar filled up with very pale people one evening and I got chatting with them. One said that the salinity of the Med is different to that of the Atlantic. This affects water density (or was it osmosis, I was struggling with the brandy sours / technical aspects by this point). This then creates two different currents through the Straits, one deep, one shallow that flow in opposite directions. A trick for boats trying to sneak through (ISTR he mentioned the Sov Black Sea fleet routing via the Bosphorous?) was to “hang” in the relevant layer and drift through on the current?

Wind up or Gen?
Gen.
 
Just watched the documentary on The Perisher course and one of the candidates / victims used this to great effect. Clever stuff.
....... One said that the salinity of the Med is different to that of the Atlantic.

Pity you didn't ask him about diving under the ice cap......... Salt and fresh water? VERY interesting. Sometimes light brown trousers are useful.
 
Thanks gents.

One more, then I promise I’ll leave you alone! I’m genuinely fascinated (I’m also keen to impress my Mrs with lots of nautical stuff as she’s from Navy stock so I might get a nosh).

“Hanging” the boat on the periscope. Periscope up changes the volume of the boat‘s displacement and thus its buoyancy so this has to be compensated for to keep the boat at the optimum periscope depth? Presumably something to do with not wanting to have too much periscope exposed to detection?

Gen?
 
Can I ask why the conning tower has two GPMGs (?) mounted on it whilst the sub is in port.

Surely the Scots aren't that antagonistic.

Edit: A serious question.

They're to fight off the midges.
 
Thanks gents.

One more, then I promise I’ll leave you alone! I’m genuinely fascinated (I’m also keen to impress my Mrs with lots of nautical stuff as she’s from Navy stock so I might get a nosh).

“Hanging” the boat on the periscope. Periscope up changes the volume of the boat‘s displacement and thus its buoyancy so this has to be compensated for to keep the boat at the optimum periscope depth? Presumably something to do with not wanting to have too much periscope exposed to detection?

Gen?
NO!

The boats gets trimmed - water in or out depending on a number of things, until she is 'just right' . We then come up to Periscope Depth (PD) whereupon the mast is raised.

In the 'old days' the chap manning the periscope would ask for it to be raised to his command - he'd actually follow it up until he could see over the water surface and stop raising. Remember that some officers are 6 feet, some 5 feet, hence the variable height.

Note that now the 'periscopes' are non hull penetrating and are (very) simply out, cameras. Thus it is possible for the 'periscope' to be raised, do a full 360, then lowered in seconds. The information taken can then be displayed/analysed at leisure by the team.

//Dit on//

There was a raised coaming about 18 inches high all round the periscope wells in the Control Room - just the right height to rest your feet on, like a bar rail. This was verboten, as your foot could get trapped. As a panel operator, virtually the ONLY time I could do something without a verbal command was when a periscope was raised and the ESM devices detected a radar, where a 'code-word' was shouted out. I then had to immediately drop the periscope(s) to avoid detection.

So it came to pass, 'Raise search.' Up it goes. CODEWORD, CODEWORD, CODEWORD, so the panel operator (sadly not me!) hit the switch. Funny old thing was, the the officer had his foot on the coaming!

Rapidly descending periscope neatly removed the toe-cap of his steel toed steaming boats, leaving sore little piggies behind.

He was still bleeding when the first jokes and cartoons appeared!

//Dit over//
 

lert

LE
Doesn't matter how often you tell them not to touch the big red button.....
Nuclear cat.jpg


It was the ship's cat wot done it
 
It saves lugging them around whilst simultaneously deterring opportunists who may try to pinch the uranium.

I thought Commancio (or whatever they are called now) were there to ensure security of boats.
 
I thought Commancio (or whatever they are called now) were there to ensure security of boats.

All about layers of security.
 

Pompeyexpat

Clanker
Can I ask why the conning tower has two GPMGs (?) mounted on it whilst the sub is in port.

Surely the Scots aren't that antagonistic.

Edit: A serious question.
They aren’t routinely fitted while alongside, but will be rigged prior to sailing and de-rigged after coming alongside. As the boat was going through operational sea training for at least some of the filming it’s possible they were rigged for inspection by the sea training staff.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
They aren’t routinely fitted while alongside, but will be rigged prior to sailing and de-rigged after coming alongside. As the boat was going through operational sea training for at least some of the filming it’s possible they were rigged for inspection by the sea training staff.
Those Jockinese are sneaky buggers.
 

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