Submarine jetty £92 million over budget

#4
Is it a jetty for submarines or an underwater jetty?

I'd like to think the answer was obvious, but you never know with the MoD.

Lessons have been learnt... the HMG including the MoD should be beyond expert in all things by now, the amount of 'lessons learnt' they've had.

Similarly it's a fcuking jetty.

Big lump of concrete, would help if it was on the edge of a body of water. Said body of water needs to be deep enough to accomodate vessels to be serviced even at a Low Spring.

Iron works to tie up to, fresh water, electric and sewage facilities. And a couple of loading cranes.

It isn't that taxing.

£92 million over and a coupple of years? Who did we contract the Chuckle Brothers?
 
#5
... it's a fcuking jetty.

Big lump of concrete, would help if it was on the edge of a body of water. Said body of water needs to be deep enough to accomodate vessels to be serviced even at a Low Spring.

Iron works to tie up to, fresh water, electric and sewage facilities. And a couple of loading cranes....
It's not, though. It's a floating jetty, and has a few more services than you mentioned.
 
#7
It's not, though. It's a floating jetty, and has a few more services than you mentioned.
It's still in an established harbour, and even a floating jetty... so a couple of BFO hinges, hammer some greased poles in to keep in in place, a moving ramp and an air pocket inside the concrete/iron. We're not talking about pushing the technological boundaries here are we? Floating jetties... it's the future!

It isn't goint to be that much more complicated than shore power, fresh water, sewage and a couple of crans (possibly specialised). What more do you need as part of the jetty?
 
#14
Not just a jetty. It's 44,000 tonnes of steel, concrete, cabling, pipework and certain 'facilities' intended to support UK nuclear submarines for the next 50 years. It is meant to be earthquake proof, will float with the tide, have adjustable buoyancy to maintain a critical level of freeboard and be secured to the sea bed by four giant piles, each as large as Nelson's Column:

Valiant Floating Submarine Jetty.jpg

I'm not defending the cost overrun but let's understand what we're talking about here.
 
#15
Not just a jetty. It's 44,000 tonnes of steel, concrete, cabling and certain 'facilities' intended to support UK nuclear submarines for the next 50 years. It is meant to be earthquake proof, will float with the tide, have adjustable buoyancy to maintain a critical level of freeboard and be secured to the sea bed by four giant piles, each as large as Nelson's Column:




I'm not defending the cost overrun but let's understand what we're talking about here.
Big... but hardly ground breaking stuff. And I am guessing that seeing as it is not being lauded as 'the biggest' by a MoD feed, then there are bigger out there. There are certainly bigger oil rigs.

Which company built this thing? £139 million contractual agreement, but its cost £92 million more? Is there anything on this jetty that makes it 'unique' or 'ground breaking' in technology? That would warrant such an increase in price?

If anyone here agreed £139 for a job that has been done before, say tarmacing a drive, would you be happy when the tarmacer slapped another 92 quid on top of the agreed price?

How do I get a job building widgets for teh MoD? It seems to be lucrative.
 
#17
Big... but hardly ground breaking stuff. And I am guessing that seeing as it is not being lauded as 'the biggest' by a MoD feed, then there are bigger out there. There are certainly bigger oil rigs...
There certainly are. Royal Dutch Shell's Perdido Spar semi-submersible platform floating in the Gulf of Mexico is 55,000 tonnes vice 44,000 tonnes for the submarine jetty and cost $3bn (£1.9bn) but it is the deepest in the world. However, I doubt it has the facilities to deal with nuclear emergencies or handle primary circuit low-level effluent and intermediate-level waste from the reactors of up to six submarines simultaneously i.a.w. the most stringent nuclear safety regulations imagineable.

As I said before, I'm not defending the cost overrun but there is much more to this 'jetty' than meets the eye. It's original construction would have been subject to the normal competitive tender process and it looks as though someone miscalculated. As with many other large scale projects, the quandary for the MoD was to forego having something fit for purpose or cough up the ante to see it completed.
 

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#18
And as soon as you add those magic words "nuclear safety compliant" you limited who can do the work, the cost goes up and everything takes longer. They really don't like to get it wrong where nuclear safety is concerned so each systems will have tripple redundancy, inspections at every stage of building etc.
 
#19
And as soon as you add those magic words "nuclear safety compliant" you limited who can do the work, the cost goes up and everything takes longer. They really don't like to get it wrong where nuclear safety is concerned so each systems will have tripple redundancy, inspections at every stage of building etc.
Still doesn't justify going over budget by nearly £100million.

As another poster said if I got quoted £140 to erect my shed then they decided to add £100 on to the bill I'd tell them to **** off and take their partially constructed shed with them

The problem with MOD procurement is that all efforts to prevent certain companies having the monopoly have failed and many private firms (BaE for example) seem to just milk the MOD for all its worth. If I was a tin foil hat wearing man I'd say the government actually quite liked such over spend on projects as it means the MOD is actually propping up private sector jobs.
 
#20
Next week we are going to retire all our submarines.
To cover the cost of the jetty...

Dunservin, I am sure there are bits on these jetties that others do not, but even a big bag of PIG and a high grade pumping system is NOT that technology taxing or inneed of R&D to bump the costs by 70% or cause a delay of 4 years.

I can't wait for the report on this... http://www.arrse.co.uk/royal-navy/169826-work-begins-royal-navy-ammunitioning-jetty.html looks like another opportunity for learning lessons.
 

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