Stuff Youve Written

Discussion in 'The Book Club' started by Jarrah, Sep 16, 2006.

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  1. Hello to all,

    This is my first post :D

    Since this is a literary thread, I wondered if it might be possible to progress a thread with items that contributors have written.

    (I checked out Arrsepedia but it seemed a bit complicated :cry: )

    I have a couple that I can forward details of, either here or via private messages etc.

    One is a summary of a book entitled Voice From The Ranks, by Sergeant-Major Timothy Gowing, 7th of Foot, Royal Fusiliers, about his service in the Crimea, 1854-5. (The British Army at the time suffered from inept politics that had a bad effect on equipment and supplies etc. and also threatened morale. Hmm...)

    Anyway, here's a quote:

    "The letters to my parents from the seat of war in the Crimea I have ventured to publish, trusting they will prove of more than passing interest and set more than one thinking, ‘Where is my boy tonight?’ Many of them were written under great difficulty in a bleak tent or hut with the thermometer far below freezing point, with my wet rags frozen on my back; often my overcoat stiff with frost."

    Gowing was aged twenty at the time.

    With all that has been in the news recently, his recollections seem to have a resonance. I can supply a link to the full text of his work as well.

    P.S. When Gowing was hospital in Malta after being wounded at the battle of Inkerman, November 5th, 1854 (bayoneted in each thigh). he wrote this to his father, a Baptist minister in Norwich:

    "Once more a line from your rough but affectionate son. Your letters have all reached me. I am happy to inform you that I am getting on capitally. I have the best of attention and, what’s more, a pretty young lady for my nurse. You know, father, that soldiers have an eye to pretty girls; but woe be to the man who would attempt to molest one of these dear creatures, for they are worth their weight in gold…"

    Nice picture on the Forces Dating page. I guess some things don't change :D
     
  2. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy LE Moderator

    Welcome Jarrah.

    Any reviews of books movies etc are welcome, just start a new thread each time with the title (it my pay dividends to do a quick search under the title to make sure that others haven't already started one).

    Mr H
     
  3. I think Mistersoft is your Guru.
    He's quite a good writer on various real stories,especially about 49 Para.
     
  4. Happy, Cloggie

    Many thanks, I'll get to work on this asap. Re: checking, yes. I posted some comments on All Quiet on the Western Front on another thread, with reference to when it had been mentioned earlier (by exmoorgirl). Clearly worth doing.

    Re: Mistersoft - I'll have a look for him, thanks.

    "Clowns to the right of me, jokers to the left, here I am stuck in the middle with you" Good one! :D
     
  5. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy LE Moderator

    Cloggies comments re Mistersoft were more tongue in cheek, but do go looking for him - its worth the time, some of his fiction is arrse achingly funny.

    "Its on said flabby slamming down the phone in his house in Hereford, its on kids shouted mrs flabby up the stairs, and the all sat down to watch emmerdale - LOL"
     
  6. Will do.

    One of the WW2 anecdotes I managed to collect was when lads of 2nd Para Battalion Support Company were billeted in Stoke Rochford Hall, near Grantham, in 1944 just before the Arnhem operation.

    A group of them returning from a dance dented the fender of the jeep in which they were travelling.

    (Whether or not this mishap was 'beverage related' I don't know. Possibly :? )

    The story is, they 'acquired' a jeep from a nearby USAAF base, started the ignition with the end of a Para cap-badge (perfect fit, apparently), drove it back to Stoke Rochford Hall, wire-brushed the white star off the bonnet, repainted the bonnet green and then buried the damaged jeep in the grounds.

    Where it possibly remains to this day. It was still there in the 1980s, when one of the lads told me the story.

    If it is still there, no doubt somebody could have fun with a metal detector :lol:

    To judge by the WW2 2nd Battalion veterans I met while researching my book Sound of Battle, I could certainly believe the story. They should always be remembered for their efforts, on our behalf.