Stretcher Bearers and medical orderlies

Morning gents

I'm reading a book called "Stout Hearts" about British/Canadians in Normandy. The chapter on the AMS is interesting.

It says that in a rifle company stretcher bearers were detached from the RAP to each rifle company. Would these men have been RAMC or infantry? Where they medical orderlies or is that a separate trade?
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Try this:
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exspy

LE
It says that in a rifle company stretcher bearers were detached from the RAP to each rifle company. Would these men have been RAMC or infantry?
Infantry. It's 20 or so members usually comprised a battalion's corps of drums (bugles, fifes, or pipes).

Where they medical orderlies or is that a separate trade?
No, stretcher bearers were not Medical Orderlies. MO was a trade within the RAMC.

Cheers,
Dan.
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Infantry. It's 20 or so members usually comprised a battalion's corps of drums (bugles, fifes, or pipes).



No, stretcher bearers were not Medical Orderlies. MO was a trade within the RAMC.

Cheers,
Dan.
For verification .... Is it that the drummers, buglers, pipers etc are their ‘hobby’ and their role is stretcher bearer, orderly, and pioneers etc?

Under the units structure they have a military role and under tradition they have the musician role?
 

exspy

LE
For verification .... Is it that the drummers, buglers, pipers etc are their ‘hobby’ and their role is stretcher bearer, orderly, and pioneers etc?

Under the units structure they have a military role and under tradition they have the musician role?
Ultimately, it was up to the Commanding Officer to make these decisions. It would not have been out of place for the Corps of Drums to exist as a stand alone with the unit. You'd have to look at an individual Regiment's history to see how they did it at any given period of time.

Being a piper, drummer or bugler was not a hobby but a trade within the infantry. Those so trained wore a trade patch. Pioneers were also a trade. Soldiers who were stretcher bearers or orderlies were non-tradesmen.

I don't think it would be a stretch to say that with 68 or so individual infantry regiments in the Army, there would have been 68 different ways of organizing the Corps of Drums.

Cheers,
Dan.
 

4(T)

LE
Makes you wonder what the cunning plan is now for lifting multiple battlefield casualties, given that nearly all of the bands have gone.
 
RE band deployed on Telic 1 in this role.

I remember a lad from my Sqn was just finishing a course at Chatham around the time, and tried to draw some desert kit from the clothing store down there.

Got fcuked off at the high port as it was all reserved for the bandies :lol:

Unlucky pal. The horror.
 
Infantry. It's 20 or so members usually comprised a battalion's corps of drums (bugles, fifes, or pipes).
Had to Google “Fife”, never heard that term before, of course I’d seen them played in military circles but always assumed they were a flute! Thanks @exspy
 
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Tiger-Monkey2

War Hero
Firstly if talking about British infantry, note that the drummers, buglers, pipers etc are not bandsmen. They are infantry soldiers who then learn to play the instruments. The CO of a battalion can then employ them as he thinks fit. In my battalion the Drums Platoon, has been a defence platoon for Bn HQ and IIRC when in Berlin manned the 432s with the Rarden turrets. When we were in Northern Ireland they were employed as a regular infantry platoon.

Bandsmen are professional military musicians and not infantry soldiers. As such they are not considered part of the fighting strength of the battalion, hence their use as stretcher bearers and other such tasks. They did not accompany the Battalion when it deployed to Northern Ireland, though they did pay a visit during which time, they performed as a band playing music.

Collectively the Regimental Band and the Drums Platoon were always referred as The Band and Drums because they are two separate entities.
 

exspy

LE
Firstly if talking about British infantry, note that the drummers, buglers, pipers etc are not bandsmen. They are infantry soldiers who then learn to play the instruments. The CO of a battalion can then employ them as he thinks fit.

Bandsmen are professional military musicians and not infantry soldiers.

...they are two separate entities.
It's exactly the same over here.
 
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