Straw shortage crisis for thatching industry

#1


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/25/nstraw125.xml

The traditional thatching industry is facing a crisis and could soon disappear, experts have warned.

Chris Dobson, a fourth generation roof thatcher, repairs a cottage in the Cambridgeshire village of Maxey

Wheat straw crops were devastated by last year's wet summer, leading to a shortage of supplies and high prices.

The National Society of Master Thatchers (NSMT) says the shortage of straw means that there are not even enough stocks to repair existing thatch-roofed homes.
...
There are about 30,000 thatched buildings in England...
I believe that Russia (that exports something like 14 mln. toons of wheat) could help and export wheat straw as well.

Maybe mr.Straw would ask about it?
 
#2
KGB_resident said:


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/25/nstraw125.xml

The traditional thatching industry is facing a crisis and could soon disappear, experts have warned.

Chris Dobson, a fourth generation roof thatcher, repairs a cottage in the Cambridgeshire village of Maxey

Wheat straw crops were devastated by last year's wet summer, leading to a shortage of supplies and high prices.

The National Society of Master Thatchers (NSMT) says the shortage of straw means that there are not even enough stocks to repair existing thatch-roofed homes.
...
There are about 30,000 thatched buildings in England...
I believe that Russia (that exports something like 14 mln. toons of wheat) could help and export wheat straw as well.

Maybe mr.Straw would ask about it?
Yes, but he wouldn't really want to encourage another Thatcher.
 
#4
KGB_resident said:
I believe that Russia (that exports something like 14 mln. toons of wheat) could help and export wheat straw as well.
Wrong sort of wheat straw. Two seconds in google should supply the details.

BTW: Is there anything you don't get wrong?
 
#5
For some reason, 'straw' and 'thatcher' just seem to go so well in the same sentence...
 
#6
Wheat straw is used for the ridge on a thatched roof pretty much exclusively. Lasts about 5 years and is bread and butter for the thatcher, nice lucrative repeat business. It hasn't been used as the material for the roof for many years because it doesn't last long. Water reed lasts 40ish years and used to come from marsh or estuary areas locally, or imported from Norfolk. For the last 20 years it has increasingly come from Poland and Eastern Europe.
There is no way thatching is going to die out as it is in high demand, a thatcher earns as much as a dentist. It's a much longer apprenticeship than most trades at 5 years.
Personally although I love a thatched roof as much as anyone, I would never buy a property with one.
 
#7
#9
I thought that 'thatch' went out of fashion in the 70's? People tend to go for a neater look these days.....
 
#10
I'm suprised the government hasnt banned Thatched roofs already.

Firstly for its obvious connection with the former great LEADER and secondly because its sooo middle class and very English.

Surely this is how Labour views a traditional English village?
 
#13
Cowhead said:
bovvy said:
Trunnion-Tilt said:
What's wrong with wriggley tin?
Well that's a term I've never heard before!
You've clearly never had the pleasure of digging in - i'm very jealous.
And I don't suppose you have suffered the pain and indignity of childbirth.
 
#14
bovvy said:
Cowhead said:
bovvy said:
Trunnion-Tilt said:
What's wrong with wriggley tin?
Well that's a term I've never heard before!
You've clearly never had the pleasure of digging in - i'm very jealous.
And I don't suppose you have suffered the pain and indignity of childbirth.
Childbirth? Pah! My missus did it twice, using a bit of lavender oil and a warm bath.

Mind you, you should hear her bitch if she gets a splinter in her finger....
 
#15
angular said:
bovvy said:
Cowhead said:
bovvy said:
Trunnion-Tilt said:
What's wrong with wriggley tin?
Well that's a term I've never heard before!
You've clearly never had the pleasure of digging in - i'm very jealous.
And I don't suppose you have suffered the pain and indignity of childbirth.
Childbirth? Pah! My missus did it twice, using a bit of lavender oil and a warm bath.

Mind you, you should hear her bitch if she gets a splinter in her finger....
Yep, doddle, been to two of them, nowt to it. Mind you, the hang over next day hurt.
 
#16
Excellent title for a thread, I'd be only too happy to buy you a drink for bringing a smile to my face.
Sergy do you know who Fred Dibhanh was ? He was a Steeplejack a dieing breed of worker in UK.
A well loved characters who had his own TV program often speaking about UK's Historical Industrial Heritage, now long gone.
In one program he interviewed a Thatcher, another dieing Breed, and said words to effect of
'Can't be too many of you around theses days'
"No Fred not many, but I suppose a bit like your job, still to many when it comes to contracting for a job."
john
Capitalism at work.
Steeplejack a man who repairs, maintains or knocks down Industrial Chimneys.
 
#17
jonwilly said:
Excellent title for a thread, I'd be only too happy to buy you a drink for bringing a smile to my face.
Sergy do you know who Fred Dibhanh was ? He was a Steeplejack a dieing breed of worker in UK.
A well loved characters who had his own TV program often speaking about UK's Historical Industrial Heritage, now long gone.
In one program he interviewed a Thatcher, another dieing Breed, and said words to effect of
'Can't be too many of you around theses days'
"No Fred not many, but I suppose a bit like your job, still to many when it comes to contracting for a job."
john
Capitalism at work.
Steeplejack a man who repairs, maintains or knocks down Industrial Chimneys.
John, you must try herdar, as they say in scool reportz, with both your speling and gramer. This is very important whilst writing to forriners, as otherwise they will copy you and think that they are wright

nevva forgit that yu are represenimation the entyre nashion :D
 

Latest Threads

Top