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Stop saying sir on the phone- A request by an RN doctor

The conversation shifted after Maj Gen sexton tagged in the AGC SPS Branch Sgt Maj. The Senior Soldier of the AGC (SPS) Branch tweeted that she is flabbergasted that many addresses and briefings commence with the adage “ Sirs, Ma’ams, ladies and gents”.

The discussion between the RN Doctor, the Maj Gen and the WO1 now seems to indicate the guidance for addressing a military audience should be “colleagues”
Whatever happened to "Scuse ranks . . ." (delivered in a bored tone) as a preamble. Things would appear to have gone massively downhill since 2011.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

Check_0ne_Two

Old-Salt
I made an another characteristically terrible decision this evening and logged onto Twitter. My attention was drawn to a very opinionated Royal Navy officer, an anaesthetist who posts on twitter as @doctorwibble , who is knee deep in a sexism row. This debate kicked off when the RN doc asked a question of Twitter about why the Army trains people to answer phones with Sir, particularly when they don’t know who is calling?
For example- Good morning, 49 PARA, Private Bugsy speaking Sir”.
With her feed containing white knights, seething right wingers, overly offended lefties and even a serving pongo Maj Gen I thought I’d bring it to the attention of Arrse.

So far twitter as thrown up some crackers ranging from - PC nonsense gone mad. To this is a Russians troll attack to undermine the effectiveness of our troops. The main theme however is the suggestion that the RN quack wouldn’t cope in a real war if they couldn’t cope with being called sir on the phone.

In your own time, go on.

My bold - That wasn't the main theme though was it. It was one reply.

Maybe you're the brave keyboard warrior who shit himself and deleted his post when you were made to look a right tit ?
 
The conversation shifted after Maj Gen sexton tagged in the AGC SPS Branch Sgt Maj. The Senior Soldier of the AGC (SPS) Branch tweeted that she is flabbergasted that many addresses and briefings commence with the adage “ Sirs, Ma’ams, ladies and gents”.

The discussion between the RN Doctor, the Maj Gen and the WO1 now seems to indicate the guidance for addressing a military audience should be “colleagues”

I go for "all y'all"...
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
The conversation shifted after Maj Gen sexton tagged in the AGC SPS Branch Sgt Maj. The Senior Soldier of the AGC (SPS) Branch tweeted that she is flabbergasted that many addresses and briefings commence with the adage “ Sirs, Ma’ams, ladies and gents”.

The discussion between the RN Doctor, the Maj Gen and the WO1 now seems to indicate the guidance for addressing a military audience should be “colleagues”
Major Generals may start their brief/talk with "Colleagues" while standing casually at the podium. WO1s and below may also use "Colleagues" while standing rigidly at attention!
 
Major Generals may start their brief/talk with "Colleagues" while standing casually at the podium. WO1s and below may also use "Colleagues" while standing rigidly at attention!

I always thought that acknowledgement of the senior officer present (Sir or Ma'am) followed by Ladies and Gentlemen was sufficient.

Sir's, Ma'ams ladies and gents is straight out of some Dickens parody with and would be uttered by some forelock tugging, hat doffing manservant. Horrendous.

Colleagues is fairly standard C-S, public sector newspeak and is collegiate and non-offensive.
 
Sir's, Ma'ams ladies and gents is straight out of some Dickens parody with and would be uttered by some forelock tugging, hat doffing manservant. Horrendous.

You mean like saluting...
 

Union Jack

Old-Salt
Now on page 10 and with some brilliant responses, this seems to be a clear case of "The lady doth protest too much, methinks".

I can't help wondering whether the lady concerned went to the same medical school as the female medical officer at Faslane who was renowned for giving so many of her male patients the cough test for hydrocele, even if the ailment concerned was as simple as a common cold or an ingrowing toenail.

Test complete, she would allegedly say, "Not many of those in a pound"!:eek:

Jack

PS No, not me....:D
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Been in the signals platoon if no one of importance was in the office, it would be “hello orderly room”
”What I want the signals”
”Hello, can’t hear you bad signal”
”who is this”
”You don’t know”?
”no“
”good”.
brrrrrr.............
 

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