Stop saying sir on the phone- A request by an RN doctor

Greenfly

On ROPS
On ROPs
I made an another characteristically terrible decision this evening and logged onto Twitter. My attention was drawn to a very opinionated Royal Navy officer, an anaesthetist who posts on twitter as @doctorwibble , who is knee deep in a sexism row. This debate kicked off when the RN doc asked a question of Twitter about why the Army trains people to answer phones with Sir, particularly when they don’t know who is calling?
For example- Good morning, 49 PARA, Private Bugsy speaking Sir”.
With her feed containing white knights, seething right wingers, overly offended lefties and even a serving pongo Maj Gen I thought I’d bring it to the attention of Arrse.

So far twitter as thrown up some crackers ranging from - PC nonsense gone mad. To this is a Russians troll attack to undermine the effectiveness of our troops. The main theme however is the suggestion that the RN quack wouldn’t cope in a real war if they couldn’t cope with being called sir on the phone.

In your own time, go on.
 

Greenfly

On ROPS
On ROPs
Maj Gen Neil Sexton who fills the mega PiD of Army Director Engagement & Communications General said -“ Apply a little bit of logic to the situation and step away from the emotion and it quickly becomes nonsensical to apply a gender title when answering the phone to a stranger”
 

philc

LE
I made an another characteristically terrible decision this evening and logged onto Twitter. My attention was drawn to a very opinionated Royal Navy officer, an anaesthetist who posts on twitter as @doctorwibble , who is knee deep in a sexism row. This debate kicked off when the RN doc asked a question of Twitter about why the Army trains people to answer phones with Sir, particularly when they don’t know who is calling?
For example- Good morning, 49 PARA, Private Bugsy speaking Sir”.
With her feed containing white knights, seething right wingers, overly offended lefties and even a serving pongo Maj Gen I thought I’d bring it to the attention of Arrse.

So far twitter as thrown up some crackers ranging from - PC nonsense gone mad. To this is a Russians troll attack to undermine the effectiveness of our troops. The main theme however is the suggestion that the RN quack wouldn’t cope in a real war if they couldn’t cope with being called sir on the phone.

In your own time, go on.
Do you know what I can’t recall ever using a phone in the Royal Navy, so that solves that don’t let JRs use the phone.
 
Maj Gen Neil Sexton who fills the mega PiD of Army Director Engagement & Communications General said -“ Apply a little bit of logic to the situation and step away from the emotion and it quickly becomes nonsensical to apply a gender title when answering the phone to a stranger”
Surely the argument is to make 'sir' apply to any officer / senior rank? The same way that actress and comedienne seem to have disappeared in favour of everyone being described as actors or comedians.

Problem solved.
 

Slime

LE
Oh goodie, another thread on this old subject :)
 
It is a bit odd to have the phone answered in that manner. It always makes me think the pongo at the other end is stood to attention and saluting at the same time.
 
It is a bit odd to have the phone answered in that manner. It always makes me think the pongo at the other end is stood to attention and saluting at the same time.
And you'd be right, if you were calling an Infantry or RLC establishment.
 
I binned the idea when I got to full screw. “Workshop - Cpl R”. 9 times out of 10 it was someone of SSgt or lower rank. If the OC happened to call or the SSM, the next line was “Morning Sir” If it was a female officer, oddly enough it’d be “Morning Ma’am”. Not rocket science, and no one ever got a Wendy on about it.
 
KISS principle in action.
I’m not sure asking someone to speak, salute and stand to attention is “simple”. How about a much simpler - “good morning/afternoon/evening”?
 
Ring ring, ring ring: "War Office - wanna fight?"
 
I binned the idea when I got to full screw. “Workshop - Cpl R”. 9 times out of 10 it was someone of SSgt or lower rank. If the OC happened to call or the SSM, the next line was “Morning Sir” If it was a female officer, oddly enough it’d be “Morning Ma’am”. Not rocket science, and no one ever got a Wendy on about it.
But, but , but (no, I haven't turned Welsh). From about 20 years ago women officers were saying they wanted to be called Sir, not Ma'am.
I think it was another Americanism that crossed the pond.
Seem to recall that from US TV series and films rather than it being fact.
(Oddly enough, and coincidentally, just watched an old episode of Castle and the female Captain insisted on being called Sir when Beckett called her Ma'am).
 
But, but , but (no, I haven't turned Welsh). From about 20 years ago women officers were saying they wanted to be called Sir, not Ma'am.
I think it was another Americanism that crossed the pond.
Seem to recall that from US TV series and films rather than it being fact.
(Oddly enough, and coincidentally, just watched an old episode of Castle and the female Captain insisted on being called Sir when Beckett called her Ma'am).
Having been an Officer about 20 years ago, I certainly don’t remember this.
 
It is a bit odd to have the phone answered in that manner. It always makes me think the pongo at the other end is stood to attention and saluting at the same time.
Simple really... answer the phone left handedly with perfect silence and standing properly at ease:

A second or two later the caller will say, “Hello <pause> hello?” and bingo...

Spring smartly to attention, bung up a crisp salute aaaaaand straight into the appropriate phone script; “Good Morning Sir/Ma'am, Mess Tin Repair Unit - L/Pte Knobalot here, how may I help you today Sir/Ma'am?”
 

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