Stoats being strange again...

#1
I need to get hold of some lead which has a decent arsenic content. I have been led to believe that shotshell shot, particularly Magnum shot, contains around 0.5-1.5% arsenic.

Is there a friendly clay club anywhere in the Southeast or South West of England where the shot falls into easily-collected piles that would be amenable to an idiot like me collecting some? I have thought of Bisley, but they are generally unamenable types these days... you do get a lot of shot hanging around on the green material though...

I'm currently casting from a mixture of Linotype and roofing lead, which contains no arsenic and won't quite get as hard as pure Linotype as a result when heat-treated.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
Strange bugger aren't you?!?!

Why not simply ask someone like me for some lead shot? I've got boxes of lead ingots with antimony and I've also got a direct source for lead shot.
 
#3
Biped said:
Strange bugger aren't you?!?!

Why not simply ask someone like me for some lead shot? I've got boxes of lead ingots with antimony and I've also got a direct source for lead shot.
Yes, yes I am...

"People like you" normally want payment, and being half-Northern I like to get stuff for free whenever I can! :D

What's the going rate for Magnum for lead shot then? I don't care about the size, but apparently the smaller ones have more arsenic (which is what I want).

By the way, I'm currently sitting on about 350 kg of used Linotype, but I have been bitten by the "must cast ever harder for my rifles" bug...
 
#5
I'm currently casting 45ACP (Lee 230gn TC), which I can get adequately hard with no troubles.

I'm also casting Lee 312-160-TL for 303" and would actually like to get some velocity on it, hence the hardness, and I'm also looking at getting a Lyman 311-130gn mould for my 7.62 x 39, and since it is plain base I want it as hard as I can get it.

Even though I have a ridiculous amount of Linotype, I don't want to cast it pure in any quantities, since I want the supply essentially to last me forever. Plus, if I can get some arsenic-containing lead, I should be able to add some of that to my standard mix and push a hardness of 27-30.
 
#6
3 clay clubs near SPTA, Lains Quarley, clay shoot at Cadley, and the shooting club near pewsey. Don't recollect piles of spent shot lying about though..
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#7
As for the bases, why not chuck a copper base plate onto the cast after it's made?

Don't know if you're interested but I've got boxes, and boxes, and boxes of Canadian 'Accuracy' .45 ACP bullets, not to mention a considerable number of fired cases - all cheaper than trade ;-)
 
#9
4(T) said:
Just curious - how on earth were you planning on picking up the spent shot?!
With a lead magnet... ;) anyway...

At Bisley it gathers reasonable depth at the edge of the green netting, so I was planning on just scooping it up any places where you get a reasonable depth of the stuff.

I don't need an awful lot, 25-50 pounds would last me an awfully long time.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#10
FFS, just shoot her, don't poison her :twisted:
 
#12
Biped said:
As for the bases, why not chuck a copper base plate onto the cast after it's made?

Don't know if you're interested but I've got boxes, and boxes, and boxes of Canadian 'Accuracy' .45 ACP bullets, not to mention a considerable number of fired cases - all cheaper than trade ;-)
It's not just a question of gas checking, plus the Lyman mould is plain base so won't take a gas check anyway. It does however have just the right nose shape to feed properly from the magazine.

Reference the Canadian bullets, you have p.m.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#13
Get the first shot in (works most times)
 
#14
Peter Starley at Warwick sells metallic arsenic and pure tin for adding to lead..

Wash your hands afterwards..

Though wheelweights also have a high arsenic content.
 
#15
HE117 said:
Peter Starley at Warwick sells metallic arsenic and pure tin for adding to lead..

Wash your hands afterwards..

Though wheelweights also have a high arsenic content.
Thanks.

Since lead wheel weights are obsolete, they are very hard to get. I have been alloying Linotype with roofing lead at 1:2 +1% tin to get approximately equal properties, but it does not heat-treat the same, hence the need for some arsenic content.

I shall try Mr Starley if I can't get any magnum shot.
 
#16
that would cost him cash.
although he might be able to persuade arrsers to cash up so he does not lap dance :twisted:
 
#17
stoatman said:
HE117 said:
Peter Starley at Warwick sells metallic arsenic and pure tin for adding to lead..

Wash your hands afterwards..

Though wheelweights also have a high arsenic content.
Thanks.

Since lead wheel weights are obsolete, they are very hard to get. I have been alloying Linotype with roofing lead at 1:2 +1% tin to get approximately equal properties, but it does not heat-treat the same, hence the need for some arsenic content.

I shall try Mr Starley if I can't get any magnum shot.
You are saying wheel weights are obsolete..?

What about Linotype? Have you still got a Hot Metal printer in your area?
 
#18
HE117 said:
You are saying wheel weights are obsolete..?

What about Linotype? Have you still got a Hot Metal printer in your area?
Wheel weights have been zinc here for years. I know where there is around 150 kg of them though...

I believe there is still at least one hot metal printer, but I have a stash of around 350 kg of Linotype which, when supplemented with roofing lead, should last me around 30 years. If I can get myself another 200 kg, I should have enough to last me essentially forever.
 
#19
Can you get hold of tin and antimony? I cast for the 44m lever action and made a very large batch of alloy using pure lead with 4% tin and 11% antimony. Both were bought from a fellow in Cornwall but I dont know if he is still in buisiness. Even with hot loads I found that mix hard enough to prevent stripping.
 
#20
.338lapua_magnum said:
Can you get hold of tin and antimony? I cast for the 44m lever action and made a very large batch of alloy using pure lead with 4% tin and 11% antimony. Both were bought from a fellow in Cornwall but I dont know if he is still in buisiness. Even with hot loads I found that mix hard enough to prevent stripping.
If you read up the thread, you will see that I have 350 kg of Linotype, which is 12% antimony, 4% tin, balance lead.

For the 45 revolver, I can get it hard enough (too soft and it won't take the rifling, which is rather shallow). However, for the rifle calibres I need it somewhat harder, and I don't want to cast pure Linotype because by the time my current stock runs out, chances are there won't be any more at all. Hence it needs to last (hence the alloying and heat treating). The ultimate aim is a 303 load at or over 2000 ft./s. Currently, accuracy is inversely proportional to velocity, which leads me to believe that hardness is the issue.
 

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