State Pension Age - Under Review Again

TheresaMay

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DirtyBAT
#2
Given that at the time state pension was introduced, very few people back then lived long enough to see it - I fail to understand the uproar when the government call to re-evaluate it.

It is after all, the largest chunk of the Welfare Budget.

It sounds cold, but at the time it was introduced, they probably arrived at the age by working out when the average citizen croaked and set the bar there. As we're living longer and longer I don't see why that should be any different. If you're living longer than you would've done four decades ago, then there's no reason you can't be working longer.

I'm standing by to be shot down in flames, but bottom line for me is that if I'm gonna live to the ripe old age of 85, then I'm not gonna spend 20 of them sat on my arse.
 
#7
Reading that and the way its going I'll be at least 70 at retirement
Either that or up the indivisual contributions to it. It's as DavidCameron said in an earlier post. The state pension was set up when we weren't expected to live as long.

The problem we have now, is that as people have paid into it, they think they're entitled to all of it. Nobody has the balls to say that they've paid part way to it.

Anyway, what's wrong with working to 70. There's many a spritley 70 year old working away.
 
S

syledis

Guest
#8
Daily Mail question..

if a person is granted asylum or resident status in the uk, are they entitled to a full pension even although they have never made any contributions towards it?
 
#9
Not the Basic State Pension - that depends on National Insurance contributions.
 
#13
Slightly off thread ...

Been retired over ten years now and all Pensions now being received ... pleased to be out of the uncertainty associated with initially retiring .... I in fact am better off under the current UK State Pension scheme ... in 2017 when the new State Pension comes in a lot of people are going to be worse off ...

However, second pension and other top-up arrangements will be removed under the
reforms. These other arrangements include the state second pension, the state
earnings-related pension and graduated pension. This means that many people who
contributed to these top-up arrangements will end up worse off.
Full article ... linky ... State pension overhaul to leave most people worse off - Telegraph
 
#15
Wouldn't it be nice to hear pensioners are better off? I expect many still starve and freeze to death each year.
Most pensioners are better off and the likelihood is that some of their protected universal benefits will be whittled away to share the burden. Younger, working people are bearing a disproportionate share of the pain and that is not politically acceptable in the long run.

That's from the Fabian Society; summary and full report here:


Think piece #1: The Fabian Society – Ageing in the Middle : Hanover
 
#18
Most pensioners are better off and the likelihood is that some of their protected universal benefits will be whittled away to share the burden. Younger, working people are bearing a disproportionate share of the pain and that is not politically acceptable in the long run.

That's from the Fabian Society; summary and full report here:


Think piece #1: The Fabian Society – Ageing in the Middle : Hanover
I am sure that will happen .... and the next area to be looked at will be the elimination of the tax free lump sums from none state pensions ... or the introduction of a 5 or 10 % tax on such payments ... that is why I am pleased I have all my tax free lump sums .
 
#19
I'm afraid this is inevitable, I'd just hope they'd have the political courage to phase it in rather quickly rather than slowly to avoid the wrath of voters. While the problem is nowhere near as bad in the UK as many EU countries there are simply too many old folk who have made very little provision for retirement and not enough young uns earning steady wages. Frankly money needs to be spent on improving and enabling the UK work force not on those taking their place in God's waiting room often well before they have lost the ability to earn.

After the NHS the UKs already very meager state pension is already the major rapidly ticket item in public expenditure, it dwarfs the working age entitlements this government has been whittling at to little effect. Life expectancies and to some extent the ability to work are extending while it looks like the revenue base will shrink as the UK seems to be on a path to a low productivity low wage economy. Work is changing, traditional heavy manual labor damaged folk to such an extent they often were disabled before pension age, knowledge economy jobs are not like this.

The younger generations has also been subject to a great deal of intergenerational theft, saddled with debt and deferred investment, gyped by government created real estate booms and tax breaks based on selling off national assets that were effectively electoral bribes to their grand parents. Deprived of the free education and generous state support that briefly enabled social mobility in previous generations and now increasingly trapped in a soulless consumer culture they can't afford. Conditioned by their environment they are also generally not the sort of people who see pulling together as a community to support each other as anything but a hinderance to their personal advancement. They are liable to be much more tightfisted when it comes to wards of the state. I'd be bitter in their shoes, they've yet to awaken to what has been taken from them but that day will come, some party will seize that fertile ground and harvest the fruits of grievance.

I'd question if state pensions will even survive, they are the endgame of the relentless class war against the social safe guards created by the WWII genreration.
 

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