ARRSE is supported by the advertisements on it, so if you use an adblocker please consider helping us by starting an Ad-Free subscription.

State Pension Age to Increase

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by TheresaMay, Jul 19, 2017.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Most can't afford to stop working. I bloody can't. :)
     
  2. I thought stamp duty was a transaction tax? Just asking, not having a dig.
     
  3. The French & German systems cost more than the NHS.
     
  4. Spending less on something than others does not necessarily mean your "something" costs less, it does mean there can be less resources, etc, available, which can lead to to longer waiting lists, lower survival rates, fewer treatment options and so on which may not cost the country less money once everything is added together.
     
  5. TheresaMay

    TheresaMay LE Moderator DirtyBAT

    I mentioned this on Page 2 (Post #24)

    I think the issue there is what government would have the balls to make such an unpopular (but necessary) decision and risk votes?

    After all, despite their pledges, manifestos and policies - politicians in power only want one thing. To stay in power.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  6. Yes and it is harmful. However, people have invented forms of transaction that don't attract stamp duty. The various proposals, including the EU one, mean to stop this.

    The proposed taxes on many forms of financial transaction will reduce market liquidity, decrease volumes (which is part of the purpose for many people) and cost us all money in the short and long terms.

    For the EU - they get direct funding. Which is all grease to the mill of "ever closer union" and "the only answer is more EU."
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  7. True, but if you kicked it off in, just for argument, '73 saying rises would take effect in the 90's then the chance is that there wouldn't have been the same ado due to things like life expectancy. A lot of those who would have to work longer would have been basing things on life expectancy at the time, and in '71 that was only 68 for men and 72 for women, that had only risen a couple of years by the time Thatcher came in, so people wouldn't have been so concerned about the "work until you die" notion as they didn't expect to live long as a pensioner anyway. Women were howling like harpies about "equality" 40 years ago, they could have been given the very "equality" they demanded sooner and faced women's retirement age to gradually rise until it equalled that of men earlier.

    Given the state the UK was in during the 70's and early 80's, they probably would have gotten away with it, especially as communication between the associated SJW groups, who didn't exist in such numbers back then either, was not as good as now so the same moonhowling and "protests" as now could not be arranged, by the time they could do something it would be too late.

    Makes you wonder why nobody did anything. I mean, ain't as if Thatcher was too worried about "popularity rankings" in the same way as our modern politicians, she did seem to have a tendency to be happy to grab the nettle even if it would sting, she tackled a fair whack of other things, changing things for the better in the UK, yet never went near what was obvious 30-odd years ago. Sure, we had contracting out of SERPS and other tinkering, which tells us they knew things had to change, so why she, nor anyone else, never went and did anything all them years back would be interesting reading...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Thanks
     
  9. It is, but it is one which is more or less inescapable.

    Stock transaction taxes, by contrast, only apply in the stock market where they are enacted so to avoid them you just scarper to a different regime and set up shop there. Sweden found that one out the hard way, and also found that once you scare away trade, most of it stays away thereafter.

    The big question is, how daft are the EU high command? We know that they were stupid enough that they didn't offer concessions to Britain to keep us in the EU and keep us paying into their coffers. That's a pretty high order of stupidity, not keeping your second-biggest donor sweet.

    So, they might well be thick enough to enact a transaction tax on their stock markets. They are also mulling over environmental taxes as a way of filling the twelve thousand million Euro per annum hole in their finances that our departure will leave. Crucially, what they do not seem to be doing is working out how to make do with less tax coming in.

    The EU with Britain wasn't really stable; it had an ongoing currency crisis. Without Britain, they still have a currency crisis and they also have a tax crisis and a stupid bureaucrat crisis as well.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  10. Thank you.

    Do you think that stamp duty would be expanded to cover other things to avoid the market moving?
     
  11. CplFoodspoiler

    CplFoodspoiler War Hero Book Reviewer

    Don't care. I was 65 last weekend. But I'm committed to my work for the next 7 years so I shall soldier on quite happily.
     
  12. Dorian Gray Walt
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  13. Border Force collect unpaid NHS debts on arrival or departure. But only if the trusts notify them of the debt.

    3 out 4 health tourists pay for their treatment which has a 50% surcharge. Overall, the scheme should pay for itself.

    But it's not health tourism crippling the NHS.

    It's this man and the shit government he is part of. 57f400af170000f70aac96cc.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
    • Disagree Disagree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  14. Somehow I do not see Labour and throw money at everything doing much better.

    Plus the NHS ranked at number 1 for healthcare providers, so which is it? Is the NHS world class or is it shit from those nasty Conservatives.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Are you being deliberately obtuse?

    Overall, the NHS is world class, but it depends on which criteria you value as the most important. Some areas we underperform. Others we excel. The two things we excel at are value for money, or 'bang for buck' and percentage of citizens covered, which is 100%. But waiting times are a concern and control of prices for medical supplies.

    But none of this is reason for wholesale privatisation or scrapping the NHS in it's current form. Reforms and refunding, yes, and modest increases in taxes to pay for it. I would also like to see an end to IVF or any other fertility treatment on the NHS. You do not have the right to procreate.