Stasi ghosts?

#1
Is it possible that there are still today individuals who took on the identity of others (such as ''ghosting'' the identity of those who died young)?

I have read about the British Special Branch doing this. And also the StB agents took on the identity of ''missing'' children.

But did the Stasi agents do this and then move to West Germany? If so, what happened after German reunification?
Could it be that some Stasi ''sleeper ghosts'' are still just living their assumed lives?
Maybe even some in other Western Countries, such as the UK?

But would this still be possible today, with social media such as Facebook etc?

I read about the political activist women who got into relationships with ''undercover'' British Special Branch policemen who were using assumed identities. But none of them seemed to have married. Would the ''assumed identity'' hold up to marriage? Could the undercover policeman marry using the assumed identity?

Also it seems none of these activist women met the undercover policemen's parents and family etc.

One big difference seems to be that the Special Branch policemen continued their true identities at the same time as the false assumed identities. But the StB agents seemed to abandon their true identities - but returned to using them after capture and release.

What do you think @DaManBugs ?
 
#5
OP, so by giving my post above the thumbs up. Are you acknowledging that you are in fact a journo?
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
The OP has been watching Day of the Jackal.
Too much telly, turn it off.
 
#8
Is it possible that there are still today individuals who took on the identity of others (such as ''ghosting'' the identity of those who died young)?

I have read about the British Special Branch doing this. And also the StB agents took on the identity of ''missing'' children.

But did the Stasi agents do this and then move to West Germany? If so, what happened after German reunification?
Could it be that some Stasi ''sleeper ghosts'' are still just living their assumed lives?
Maybe even some in other Western Countries, such as the UK?

But would this still be possible today, with social media such as Facebook etc?

I read about the political activist women who got into relationships with ''undercover'' British Special Branch policemen who were using assumed identities. But none of them seemed to have married. Would the ''assumed identity'' hold up to marriage? Could the undercover policeman marry using the assumed identity?

Also it seems none of these activist women met the undercover policemen's parents and family etc.

One big difference seems to be that the Special Branch policemen continued their true identities at the same time as the false assumed identities. But the StB agents seemed to abandon their true identities - but returned to using them after capture and release.

What do you think @DaManBugs ?
Asking @DaManBugs to comment on a serious thread in the Int cell, can only mean you're bent on this thread heading for the hole.
3.......2......1.......
 
#9
Regardless of whether journo or not...interesting topic and, I think previously unexplored on here.
Maybe if @Brotherton Lad can get leave granted from the Brexit threads he’d be perhaps able to shed some light ??
 
#10
Asking @DaManBugs to comment on a serious thread in the Int cell, can only mean you're bent on this thread heading for the hole.
3.......2......1.......
Hmmm, obviously a sock account or someone who has “lurked” for 15 yrs just waiting for the opportunity to post this question.
Mods...IP address/username check??
 
#11
If I “report” this, will all mods have their blue lights and sirens start sounding and, would Bamber Gascogne @Sixty be forced to momentarily discard his weighty tome on The worthiness of Etruscan pottery?
 
#12
Is it possible that there are still today individuals who took on the identity of others (such as ''ghosting'' the identity of those who died young)?

I have read about the British Special Branch doing this. And also the StB agents took on the identity of ''missing'' children.

But did the Stasi agents do this and then move to West Germany? If so, what happened after German reunification?
Could it be that some Stasi ''sleeper ghosts'' are still just living their assumed lives?
Maybe even some in other Western Countries, such as the UK?

But would this still be possible today, with social media such as Facebook etc?

I read about the political activist women who got into relationships with ''undercover'' British Special Branch policemen who were using assumed identities. But none of them seemed to have married. Would the ''assumed identity'' hold up to marriage? Could the undercover policeman marry using the assumed identity?

Also it seems none of these activist women met the undercover policemen's parents and family etc.

One big difference seems to be that the Special Branch policemen continued their true identities at the same time as the false assumed identities. But the StB agents seemed to abandon their true identities - but returned to using them after capture and release.

What do you think @DaManBugs ?
You are Charles Calthrop and I claim my 5 Francs.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#13
If I “report” this, will all mods have their blue lights and sirens start sounding and, would Bamber Gascogne @Sixty be forced to momentarily discard his weighty tome on The worthiness of Etruscan pottery?
Not as such - it would alert the Int Cell moderators...

...and they'll need to pry my copy of Panofsky's Renaissance And Renascences In Western Art from my cold, dead hands.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
#16
Regardless of whether journo or not...interesting topic and, I think previously unexplored on here.
Maybe if @Brotherton Lad can get leave granted from the Brexit threads he’d be perhaps able to shed some light ??
Haven't been posting there for days. It's all gone a bit silly season very early.

Possibly Brexit climax change.
 
#17
Haven't been posting there for days. It's all gone a bit silly season very early.

Possibly Brexit climax change.
What's your thoughts on the OP's question? I am thinking you are suitably qualified to answer.

Ta.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Is it possible that there are still today individuals who took on the identity of others (such as ''ghosting'' the identity of those who died young)?

I have read about the British Special Branch doing this. And also the StB agents took on the identity of ''missing'' children.

But did the Stasi agents do this and then move to West Germany? If so, what happened after German reunification?
Could it be that some Stasi ''sleeper ghosts'' are still just living their assumed lives?
Maybe even some in other Western Countries, such as the UK?

But would this still be possible today, with social media such as Facebook etc?

I read about the political activist women who got into relationships with ''undercover'' British Special Branch policemen who were using assumed identities. But none of them seemed to have married. Would the ''assumed identity'' hold up to marriage? Could the undercover policeman marry using the assumed identity?

Also it seems none of these activist women met the undercover policemen's parents and family etc.

One big difference seems to be that the Special Branch policemen continued their true identities at the same time as the false assumed identities. But the StB agents seemed to abandon their true identities - but returned to using them after capture and release.

What do you think @DaManBugs ?
You're right, there are still former Stasi foreign intelligence agents living under their assumed names in places like the US, UK and (the former West) Germany and (to a lesser extent) in France, Italy, Spain and various countries in Middle and South America. Their job was gathering intelligence and although many were discovered (Google "Operation Rosenholz") others weren't, for the files weren't complete. In fact, the foreign intelligence arm of the Stasi (under the master-spy Markus Wolf) succeeded in destroying around 85 percent of its files, thus making tracking such folks very difficult.

Such spies were trained for three or four years in the Soviet Union and also furnished with all the documents they needed to be accepted in their target country with credible legends that could stand up to close scrutiny. Don't forget that at the time there wasn't such a dependence on computers, so it was comparatively easy to get hold of (or fake) birth certificates, passports, school qualifications etc.

After the Fall of the Berlin Wall, their tasks became largely irrelevant and so they just stayed in place and lived their lives. It's an interesting subject and I've discussed it a number of times with former Stasi members who I go to know down the years. There's no real agreement about exactly how many still exist and most of them are now pensioners, but a vague ball-park figure is a couple of hundred. Hope this helps.

MsG
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top