• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Stalingrad

#1
Started trawling through the other 40 odd pages of this section to see if it had been mentioned already but haven't got time at the mo...soooo...i read Beevor's Stalingrad a while back and i'm currently half way through http://www.amazon.ca/Voices-Stalingrad-Nemesis-Jonathan-Bastable/dp/0715321765 so i was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of a really good read/book list....more so the soldiers story than the big picture :wink: many thanx!
 
#5
Guy Sajers Forgotten Soldier is a great read from a German soldiers point of view on the Eastern Front. There is some debate about its authenticity - but in my opinion largely unfounded. Pick it up you won't regret it.
 
#6
yeah...well impressed when i read that......i've read quite a few books on WW2...mainly post 42 as that's the years i'm interested in......trying to concentrate purely on Stalingrad at the mo.... just ordered 3 books from amazon to feed the fire..lol :lol:
 
#7
May I suggest a different tack.
Joseph Attard "The Battle of Malta".
An excellent read from all points and especially from
civilians point of view.
 
#9
105AVRE said:
yeah...well impressed when i read that......i've read quite a few books on WW2...mainly post 42 as that's the years i'm interested in......trying to concentrate purely on Stalingrad at the mo.... just ordered 3 books from amazon to feed the fire..lol :lol:
What have you ordered, if I may ask?
 
#10
Could try 'War on the Eastern Front - The German soldier in Russia' by James Lucas. 'Interviews, diaries, letters and other unpublished material', of German soldiers.

No.9
 
#11
Tartan_Terrier said:
105AVRE said:
yeah...well impressed when i read that......i've read quite a few books on WW2...mainly post 42 as that's the years i'm interested in......trying to concentrate purely on Stalingrad at the mo.... just ordered 3 books from amazon to feed the fire..lol :lol:
What have you ordered, if I may ask?
oops...should read... 2!
Victory at Stalingrad - Geoffry Roberts
Christmas at Stalingrad - Beevor (pocket penguins)

and the other one was Decision at St Vith - Charles Whiting...as i've got most of the others in the Spellmount Siegfried Line series....Berlin by Beevor was very interesting.....and his books seem to be the ones i compare the rest to for ease of read and sources of information :)
 
#12
Try Enemy at the Gates by William Graig. This came out in the 70's and was used by Beevor. The film mainly dealt with the sniper duel but the book itself is a good, balanced readable account.

Stalingrad by Edward P Hoyt. American author but very readable.

The road to Stalingrad by John Erickson. Leading expert on the Eastern Front. A mega book but covers all of the Eastern Front from Barbarossa to Stalingrad. His second book, the road to Berlin, deals with 43-45.

Secret of Stalingrad. Can't remember the author at the moment but this was also released in the 70's and the author had access to Russian archives at the time and was one of the first to lay out the big plan behind the Russian offensive.

I shall check my library tonight for others I can dig up. :wink:
 
#15
intli said:
Try Enemy at the Gates by William Graig. This came out in the 70's and was used by Beevor. The film mainly dealt with the sniper duel but the book itself is a good, balanced readable account.

Stalingrad by Edward P Hoyt. American author but very readable.

The road to Stalingrad by John Erickson. Leading expert on the Eastern Front. A mega book but covers all of the Eastern Front from Barbarossa to Stalingrad. His second book, the road to Berlin, deals with 43-45.

Secret of Stalingrad. Can't remember the author at the moment but this was also released in the 70's and the author had access to Russian archives at the time and was one of the first to lay out the big plan behind the Russian offensive.

I shall check my library tonight for others I can dig up. :wink:
I did read "War Of The Rats"(David Robbins) which is nearly exactly the same as the "Enemy At The Gates" film....i presume it's the same as the book? either way....very riveting read as well :wink:
 
#17
105AVRE said:
intli said:
Try Enemy at the Gates by William Graig. This came out in the 70's and was used by Beevor. The film mainly dealt with the sniper duel but the book itself is a good, balanced readable account.

Stalingrad by Edward P Hoyt. American author but very readable.

The road to Stalingrad by John Erickson. Leading expert on the Eastern Front. A mega book but covers all of the Eastern Front from Barbarossa to Stalingrad. His second book, the road to Berlin, deals with 43-45.

Secret of Stalingrad. Can't remember the author at the moment but this was also released in the 70's and the author had access to Russian archives at the time and was one of the first to lay out the big plan behind the Russian offensive.

I shall check my library tonight for others I can dig up. :wink:
I did read "War Of The Rats"(David Robbins) which is nearly exactly the same as the "Enemy At The Gates" film....i presume it's the same as the book? either way....very riveting read as well :wink:
War of the Rats is a good book, but was novel based on Stalingrad, not a history. Enemy at the Gates was one of the first readable histories of Stalingrad and beevor used a lot for his research. The film Enemy at the gates utilised the story of the snipers from the book then expanded on it for the main theme of the film, using the battle as background. :wink:
 
#18
Two classics from the German side; "Hitler Moves East" and "Scorched Earth" both by Paul Carell. Covers the whole Eastern Front from beginning to end in a very easy to read and fascinating manner, using extracts from a multitude of sources on the German side and quite a few Russian sources. A companion photo volume was also published, mainly colour photos by German soldiers. Was reprinted a few years ago and J. J. Fedorowicz Publishing in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada might still have copies. They reprint a great many of the better German books. The chapters on the fighting in the Crimea and Sevastopal amazed me when I first read them, descriptions of fighting in the underground fortresses (virtual cities) to the last man.
 
#19
Anything by Prof J Erickson - they can be hard going at first, but Erickson was very ahead of his time, unlike a lot of his academic colleagues/authors/peers, he actually went to the Soviet Union to utilise state archives/conduct research, as opposed to basing a lot of his work from German assessments of the Red Army.

The Road to Stalingrad: Stalin`s War with Germany, Volume One
Amazon
link

David Glantz is very good too:

August storm the Soviet strategic offensive in Manchuria by David M.Glantz
Pdf
Link

August Storm Soviet Tactical and Operational Combat in Manchuria, 1945 by David M. Glantz
Pdf Link

The Soviet Airborne Experience by LTC David M. Glantz
Pdf
Link

Soviet Defensive Tactics at Kursk, July 1943 by COL David M. Glantz
Pdf
Link
 
#20
I just checked Google and Carell`s books seem to be available, including two others worthy of mention "Invasion! They`re Coming!" (Normandy) and "Foxes of the Desert", all fairly well received. Editions Heimdal in France also publishes a series of first rate photo compilations of various battles/ campaigns in WW1 and WW2 ,although they`re a bit expensive they are superb books with many never before published photos, large format books.
 

Latest Threads