Stalingrad 1942

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Saw this ...made me think. Anyway, for interest:

 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Go mad...spend five minutes of your life watching the video....

PS...not be missed...the only Panzer Kampfgruppe named after a General who's first name (I kid you not) was Hyacynth....
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
von Strachwitz
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Well worth watching.
Mark Felton isn't given to hyperbole, so when he says that the brave and stubborn resistance put up by this small, all-women unit probably saved Stalingrad falling, and altering the whole course of the war, you have to take notice.
 
Go mad...spend five minutes of your life watching the video....

PS...not be missed...the only Panzer Kampfgruppe named after a General who's first name (I kid you not) was Hyacynth....
Hyacinth was an acceptable name for boys in France and Germany for some time, what with him being a Greek hero and that.
 

sand_rat

Old-Salt
Please red Antony Beevers book on Stalingrad, if you thought you knew all about it (as I did) then you will learn something, even that the Russians would shoot Russian children if they helped the Germans, thats right shoot your own children, nice guys those Russians . . .
 
Well worth watching.
Mark Felton isn't given to hyperbole, so when he says that the brave and stubborn resistance put up by this small, all-women unit probably saved Stalingrad falling, and altering the whole course of the war, you have to take notice.
The Germans had already captured nine tenths of Stalingrad. I rather think that it was the efforts of several Soviet armies in 'Operation Uranus, the November winter counter attack which rolled up the Romanian, Hungarian, and Italien Armies, and led to the encirclement of the Sixth Army.

Brave as a small group of Soviet hotties may have been. I don't think it was just their actions which altered the course of the war, even though it is a nice story.

Operation Uranus.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
And von Paulus promoted to Field Marshall with the expectation by Hitler he would take the German way out by commiting suicide as no Field Marshall had ever been captured alive after surrender.
 
I’ve just finished a re-read of Beevor’s “Stalingrad” and that’s very instructive.

I recently mentioned Beevor's The Battle For Spain on another thread and is a real eye opener , especially where the mythical International Brigades are concerned
 
And von Paulus promoted to Field Marshall with the expectation by Hitler he would take the German way out by commiting suicide as no Field Marshall had ever been captured alive after surrender.
He was never actually a Von. Just plain FM Paulus. Later head of the Barracked Polizei in the DDR prior to the creation of the NVA.
 
The Germans had already captured nine tenths of Stalingrad. I rather think that it was the efforts of several Soviet armies in 'Operation Uranus, the November winter counter attack which rolled up the Romanian, Hungarian, and Italien Armies, and led to the encirclement of the Sixth Army.

Brave as a small group of Soviet hotties may have been. I don't think it was just their actions which altered the course of the war, even though it is a nice story.

Operation Uranus.
Arguably - Stalingrad had been held before Uranus kicked off - To the contrary preparations for Uranus weakened the defence - ammunition allocation reduced and replacements were limited
 
Still fail to understand why they didn't just bypass the place by crossing the Volga either side and cutting off supplies and reinforcements .
Bombing the living crap out of a place , when you know you are going to need winter quarters , was another major lack of foresight as well
 

Dalef65

Old-Salt
Still fail to understand why they didn't just bypass the place by crossing the Volga either side and cutting off supplies and reinforcements .
Bombing the living crap out of a place , when you know you are going to need winter quarters , was another major lack of foresight as well
Barbarossa itself was a lack of foresight.
 
Well worth watching.
Mark Felton isn't given to hyperbole, so when he says that the brave and stubborn resistance put up by this small, all-women unit probably saved Stalingrad falling, and altering the whole course of the war, you have to take notice.
I watch Mark Felton quite a lot, but like the THG they like to emphasise the subject they talk about. But it's almost like arguing that had Stalingrad fallen, the Russians would have lost the war. That's simply inconceivable given the Scale of the Eastern Front. It was logistics\quantity that lost Germany the war there. Even if Germany had won Kursk subsequently they couldn't have won it. Stalingrad was an ego trip for both sides. In consequence it was more psychological than anything else. They are interesting pieces in their own right, but lets not forget, Germans didn't mobilise their women
 
Saw this ...made me think. Anyway, for interest:

1593856193611.png

It is from famous (in Russia) film (1972). It is not about Stalingrad. Young anti-aircraft female gunners defend railway station from German bombing raids in Karelia.
The film deals with antiwar themes and focuses on a garrison of Russian female soldiers in World War II. It was nominated for an Oscar in the Best Foreign Language Film category. The film is set in Karelia (near Finland) and was filmed near Ruskeala.
The lass that you see on the front is a well known actress - Yelena Drapeko
She is now an MP form the Communist party
1593856830610.png


The film became extremely popular in many countries, in China for example. There is Chinese version of "Dawns Here are Quiet" Opera

1593857014146.png
 
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I watch Mark Felton quite a lot, but like the THG they like to emphasise the subject they talk about. But it's almost like arguing that had Stalingrad fallen, the Russians would have lost the war. That's simply inconceivable given the Scale of the Eastern Front. It was logistics\quantity that lost Germany the war there.
You could also make the point that Germany had lost the war even before they invaded Poland in September 1939 because they hadn't the resources to fight a global war of attrition lasting years. By December 1941 they had no way of outproducing the combined industrial might of the USA and USSR
 

Chef

LE
Something struck me watching that. Quite often mention is made of tanks rolling off the assembly line and into battle, unpainted and manned by factory workers.

That implies that the factories were also munition and fuel dumps as, presumably, the wagons needed to be bombed up prior to action.

Would that have been the case or were they driven to the nearest B echelon to get bombed up and crewed by army types?

I'm not doubting it happened but the logistics involved must have been interesting.
 

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