St. Michaels Orphans

Discussion in 'Films, Music and All Things Artsy' started by Sec1, Aug 16, 2005.

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  1. Anybody else this side of the pond had a chance to read St.Michaels Orphans. Its a new book about the Canadian Airborne with a very true to life story. So if you have ever wondered what its like to be on the pointy end of a 5.56 or 7.62 this book gives you a damn good idea! For those that have see if you experience the same feelings I did.
     
  2. New York Times Book Critic

    St. Michael’s Orphans? by Linda Pannell

    A well-researched and innovatively written political thriller, Linda Pannell’s new novel, St. Michael’s Orphans, is a worthy addition to contemporary literature.

    When the FLNQ, a Canadian terrorist group with the separatist aim of obtaining total independence for Quebec, sabotages a nuclear facility and kidnaps government officials, it seems that nothing—least of all the disorganized provincial government—can stop them. However, in a Le Femme Nikita meets To Catch a Thief twist of fate, former terrorist Heather Winston is recruited by the Canadian secret service to infiltrate the cell. Winston, along with CSIS operatives, succeeds in working her way into the FLNQ, but her situation is complicated by a bizarrely-rendered and deeply affecting love affair with a fellow spy and a cat-and-mouse game that must be played to avoid discovery by old acquaintances.

    The plot thickens as the Cree nation decides to assert its autonomy, further weakening the Quebec government, which is then reduced to hiring a mercenary force to protect its right to power. Canadian sergeant Austin Miller is appointed to free an FLNQ hostage that Heather’s cell is hiding and ultimately must save Heather and her lover, who just happens to be a former friend of his. Soon, reverberations of the Canadian conflict reach around the globe as France and the United States each find their own interests very much at stake.

    With a pace that would give LeCarre a heart attack, Pannell’s story is a brilliant bullet train of momentum. Her rough-hewn characters transmogrify into reluctant heroes even as the world’s leaders devolve into stuttering and self-interested incompetents. With more twists than a yard-long churro, St. Michael’s Orphans is a must-read for anyone interested in world affairs, from the constant danger presented by separatist groups to the cloaked machinations of nations. Pannell is a welcome addition to the ranks of the world’s engaging authors.