Squaddies go all Cameo on Ops

#1
Ministry of Defence | Defence News | Equipment and Logistics | MOD introduces pelvic protection for front line troops

Greater pelvic protection for troops in Afghanistan has been introduced to help mitigate the effects of IED blasts, the MOD has announced.
Pelvic body armour system

The three-tiered system of clothing and armour consists of special protective underwear and detachable armoured modular trousers. It has been designed to integrate with current kit being used by troops on operations.

The MOD has spent £10m on the new armour system to date. It balances protection with the necessary comfort and manoeuvrability for troops to undertake operations, enabling them to wear one or more of the protective layers depending on the task. They are already being worn by troops on operations, with 45,000 pairs delivered to Afghanistan and another 15,000 ready to be issued to deploying troops. A further 60,000 are to be manufactured and delivered to troops early next year.

The first layer of protection is a pair of shorts, which troops wear as underwear.

Using cutting-edge science and technology developed by the MOD and Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), the underwear is manufactured from scientifically-tested ballistic silk material that provides an initial level of protection to mitigate against the effects of blasts, including shrapnel.
 

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#3
Doesn't look very comfortable. I think I'd rather let my balls take their chances.........
 
#5
Could have done with one of those for my divorce
 
#6
Although I'm sure atleast one of our wounded will have had some seriously life changing injuries in "That Region" I can't help wonder where they are going to stop with armour.

Soon your average tom is not going to be able to walk never mind run/crawl.

I reckon putting all this kit on must take a while too.

Worth it when you need it but more weight when you don't. Tough Choice!
 
#10
Although I'm sure atleast one of our wounded will have had some seriously life changing injuries in "That Region" I can't help wonder where they are going to stop with armour.

Soon your average tom is not going to be able to walk never mind run/crawl.

I reckon putting all this kit on must take a while too.

Worth it when you need it but more weight when you don't. Tough Choice!
They did apparently test it on obstacle courses to make sure it didn't affect troops' ability to complete them
 
#11
They did apparently test it on obstacle courses to make sure it didn't affect troops' ability to complete them

Ahh - Either you know me or have just picked up on a subject close to my heart regarding Body armour and the testing there of...
 
#14
Doesn't look very comfortable. I think I'd rather let my balls take their chances.........
Mebbe should seek Dingerr's advice.

Personally, I always hated all forms of body armour - except when I figured the threat was OTT (relatively)

But that was in Belfast mid 70s to early 80s and S Armagh a decade later.

They weren't digging IEDs up by the dozen every day in either place or time.
 
#15
Although I'm sure at least one of our wounded will have had some seriously life changing injuries in "That Region" I can't help wonder where they are going to stop with armour.
I am sure it is a few more than one and hopefully they will stop just after designing armour that is comfy to wear and 100% protective.

It may be a while!
 
#16
For me it would depend on how comfortable it was in the prone. I'd never wear the ballistic kecs though, well not in summer anyway.
 
#17
Great, but is it skid-proof?
 
#19

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