Sports and Alcohol

Discussion in 'Sports, Adventure Training and Events' started by Brew_Time, Apr 14, 2007.

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  1. Sport and alcohol, what a wonderful combination.

    Just sat at home watching the first FA Cup semi with a few beers, bottle of wine and bottle of whisky. How many of us watch football without a beer or two. I'm a big motor sport fan and like to down a few drinks watching that too. Roll on July 1st when I can go down the pub and watch it there and socialise as well.

    When David Beckam scores I drink Becks, when Paul Scoles scores I drink Scoll - I just glad David Seaman was a goal keeper.

    BT. :D
     
  2. Go on mixing your drinks like that - even thematically - and your liver will take a serious dislike to you. Take it from one who's been there.

    "Whisky before wine is fine;
    But wine before whisky is risky."

    But since you kindly ask, mine's a large Bushmills with a glass of Guinness. (No, not that foul super-chilled stuff! Arthur Guinness's sublime draught stout at a temperature as God intended.)
     
  3. If my liver isn't knacked already - it never will be. Must admit tho, its always in the back of my mind. We hear of it all too often these days.

    Can't say I've ever tried Bushmills. For blended I usually go for Grouse and for the malts I like Highland Park.

    BT.
     
  4. There's always time . . . . Alas! Ask a kindly MO in confidence to run a LFT for you, just to see.

    I commend Bushmills to you. White lable is good. "Black Bush" is heavier on the wallet - and the liver. But the dry finish of Irish isn't to everyone's taste, after the comparative sweetness of Scotch. A taste worth acquiring, IMHO.

    The very best of the non-ridiculously-expensive Irishes is Jameson 10-y-o - "Crested Ten". Sublime, if you can get it.

    Highland Park is excellent. Professional Scotch blenders agree it's the best of the "ordinary" malts, apart from Macallan, which is really unaffordable.

    Grouse is most professionals' favourite for ordinary sipping. It has a high proportion of single malts in its makeup.

    Slainte!
     
  5. Well, I cant mix drinks as i am a light weight, one and am gone lol.

    Dont do drink as if i do then my good mates will be dragging me back home.