Spent brass and reloading at bases

ugly

LE
Moderator
I'm glad its not just Gun Nut that remembers that!
 
Good grief GN, that must have been a while ago!
Late 90s I think. I'm not that old!

I presume that the waterproofing of the neck these days is just done by a good tight crimp.

Another reason why reloading would be a poor idea is that military ammo needs to withstand rough handling. I reckon that it would be difficult to maintain reloaded ammunition to a tight QA standard in the field.

Then there is the whole question of the safety case. Yes - I think that we can confidently say that it would be a poor idea!
 
It's not crimped as in stab or ring crimp, more of a compression fit, but for once I've forgotton the technical term - probably compression crimp.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I try not to apply a crimp and rather rely on good neck tension and often its tight enough to shave a ring of copper from the jacket!
 
I try not to apply a crimp and rather rely on good neck tension and often its tight enough to shave a ring of copper from the jacket!
On any other thread that would be deemed filth.
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I was looking it up in my Phrofanasurace by Mr R Melly.
 
I believe it's a 'roll crimp'. On mil ammo it's used in conjunction with a cannelure to give a very strong fit of the bullet.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Not sure if it is anymore!
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

HE117

LE
Holy Thread revival Cuts..!

I don't know how the crimp is put in on the new machines at RG, but the old machines had a collet in the die that deformed the rim of the case into the cannelure. It was done at one of the positions on the "Race track" at the top of the machine. It is a very similar action to the Lee "Factory crimp" die.

Coning is achived by pushing the loaded case into a tapered die... not done much in small calibres as I recall. Coning is used more for things like locking closing disks in flares and rocket motors I think!
 
Holy Thread revival Cuts..!

I don't know how the crimp is put in on the new machines at RG, but the old machines had a collet in the die that deformed the rim of the case into the cannelure. It was done at one of the positions on the "Race track" at the top of the machine. It is a very similar action to the Lee "Factory crimp" die.

Coning is achived by pushing the loaded case into a tapered die... not done much in small calibres as I recall. Coning is used more for things like locking closing disks in flares and rocket motors I think!
Or in the old .455. 3-sector crimp into one of the lube grooves, PLUS coning the case mouth onto the curve of the nose.

Plus then forcing the .455 proj down a .450 hole.

Seems like they did everything they could to get the pressure up as high as possible, presumably to get a good clean burn.
 
I am currently doing a study on the ammunition supply system for small arms ammo specifically for training in the British Army. I am looking for your opinions about what you think are the causes of bad behaviour (firing off rounds at the end of the range, hiding/binning ammo, over-ordering for training, pressure on the G4 heirarchy to use everything, budgetary cycle, over generous AOSP etc. etc.). I would appreciate your views on how the system could be changed to eliminate the pressures to behave badly. If anyone out there knows of any studies that have been done before, or papers written etc, I'd also appreciate a steer in that direction.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I am currently doing a study on the ammunition supply system for small arms ammo specifically for training in the British Army. I am looking for your opinions about what you think are the causes of bad behaviour (firing off rounds at the end of the range, hiding/binning ammo, over-ordering for training, pressure on the G4 heirarchy to use everything, budgetary cycle, over generous AOSP etc. etc.). I would appreciate your views on how the system could be changed to eliminate the pressures to behave badly. If anyone out there knows of any studies that have been done before, or papers written etc, I'd also appreciate a steer in that direction.
You need to start a thread on its own otherwise only folk subscribed to this one will notice plus you may need to convince folk of your credentials ie not a journo looking for waste stories.
 
I am currently doing a study on the ammunition supply system for small arms ammo specifically for training in the British Army. I am looking for your opinions about what you think are the causes of bad behaviour (firing off rounds at the end of the range, hiding/binning ammo, over-ordering for training, pressure on the G4 heirarchy to use everything, budgetary cycle, over generous AOSP etc. etc.). I would appreciate your views on how the system could be changed to eliminate the pressures to behave badly. If anyone out there knows of any studies that have been done before, or papers written etc, I'd also appreciate a steer in that direction.
there's plenty of info on here about:

1. difficulty of getting bods, ammo and ranges in the same place at the same time. Resulting in ranges being "booked solid", but if you go up there and look, the only thing going on there is tumbleweed drifting across.
2. extreme bureaucratic faff in returning ammo that has left its can, let alone ammo that has left its carton.
3. treating shooting training as some faff to be got through as quickly as possible so that people can go back to real training, i.e. drilling, ironing and polishing :p
 

AT55

LE
As an Ex Ammunition Technician I wonder why no army has ever thought of this. I thought about it for less than a nanosecond and thought that it is better left to the factories designed and built to do it. Steel boxes full of SAA are very safe to transport and store whereas drums of SAA powder re not.. There is a lot more to making ammunition from fired cases than dropping in a bit of propellant and banging a bullet in the vacant hole.
 

mickeyluv

War Hero
As an Ex Ammunition Technician I wonder why no army has ever thought of this. I thought about it for less than a nanosecond and thought that it is better left to the factories designed and built to do it. Steel boxes full of SAA are very safe to transport and store whereas drums of SAA powder re not.. There is a lot more to making ammunition from fired cases than dropping in a bit of propellant and banging a bullet in the vacant hole.




Tell that to the bloke at 4.06!



 

ugly

LE
Moderator
It is amazing that they don't kill themselves and actually ever kill anyone they have aimed at!
 
As an Ex Ammunition Technician I wonder why no army has ever thought of this. I thought about it for less than a nanosecond and thought that it is better left to the factories designed and built to do it. Steel boxes full of SAA are very safe to transport and store whereas drums of SAA powder re not.. There is a lot more to making ammunition from fired cases than dropping in a bit of propellant and banging a bullet in the vacant hole.
I know, very complicated........I do it in my garage and can manually knock out 1000 rounds an hour.

Dave Dawsons place just south of me. I have a similar but one size down reloader to the ones he uses

 

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