Special Reconnaissance Squadron

#1
My father was an Irish Hussar before joining the Special Reconnaissance Squadron. The Irish Hussars I am familiar with, the SRS I know nothing of, beyond a short article on Paradata. Can the collective memory of Arrse shed any light on this select group? I would ask the old man, but as of the 19th of February it's too late.
Thanks in advance.
 
#2

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#3
My father was an Irish Hussar before joining the Special Reconnaissance Squadron. The Irish Hussars I am familiar with, the SRS I know nothing of, beyond a short article on Paradata. Can the collective memory of Arrse shed any light on this select group? I would ask the old man, but as of the 19th of February it's too late.
Thanks in advance.
I thought the paradata article was very informative. Probably the best source of information you'll find.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#4
I take it back. A few years ago that article was several pages long. Maybe speak to the people at Paradata and ask what happened to it.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#6
I've written to Paradata asking if they have the full article. I'll get back to you.
 
#7
I take it back. A few years ago that article was several pages long. Maybe speak to the people at Paradata and ask what happened to it.
From what I can gather reading the article it was what would be called an ISTAR asset. Intelligence survellance, target acquisition and recon.

If the role was taken over by 23, then their job was to let the Russians go past and report on what was happening from behind the lines in order to gain intelligence and call in artillery and air strikes.

There’s a book called ‘Chieftans’ that covers a similar unit. When the balloon went up, they’d been pre deployed to a bunker with their vehicles. Once the soviets has gone past they emerged from their hide and started reporting back what was happening.

It could be done on foot or in vehicles. I believe 23 specialised I’m digging holes and hiding in them for extended periods of time, but obviously being in armoured cars, they could do the same.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#10
Pleased to report that Sam at Paradata got back to me in very short order and was happy to send the same link.

It clearly remains an active site, and I've been known in the past to enjoy the occasional perusal.
 
#11
So would these pre recce'd locations have back up supplies located near by? Apologies if that's a bone question, but I wondered if there were pre prepped positions dug in
 
#12
With the benefit of hindsight, I feel it's such a shame that those who were in previous wars didn't feel able (like my Dad) to talk about their experiences. There are so many questions I'd like to ask, but never can.
 
#13
My father was an Irish Hussar before joining the Special Reconnaissance Squadron. The Irish Hussars I am familiar with, the SRS I know nothing of, beyond a short article on Paradata. Can the collective memory of Arrse shed any light on this select group? I would ask the old man, but as of the 19th of February it's too late.
Thanks in advance.
Another 'crow' asking about western SF.
How is the weather in St Petersburg? not bad enough to stop you fishing, obviously.
 
#14
The role was taken over* by both 21 and 23 (TA) SAS, using (at first) wriggly tin shelters in which movement was very difficult, but later, MEXE shelters were brought into use, which allowed one to stand, although after a few days it was more of a stoop. Deployment was by Landrover+trailer and had to be complete by daybreak (LR buggered off after unloading). The size of the shelter meant that the first night's deployment was busy, and in training NBC kit was worn, so something of an ordeal. All good fun for the students, solicitors and lecturers in their free time off work, but few expected it to end happily in the event that diplomacy failed. The 'wall of poo' which built up over time was a bit of a trial, too, opposite the 'wall of pee'.

* possibly more accurate to say that the role was always theirs, although I don't know the full history.
 
#15
The role was taken over* by both 21 and 23 (TA) SAS, using (at first) wriggly tin shelters in which movement was very difficult, but later, MEXE shelters were brought into use, which allowed one to stand, although after a few days it was more of a stoop. Deployment was by Landrover+trailer and had to be complete by daybreak (LR buggered off after unloading). The size of the shelter meant that the first night's deployment was busy, and in training NBC kit was worn, so something of an ordeal. All good fun for the students, solicitors and lecturers in their free time off work, but few expected it to end happily in the event that diplomacy failed. The 'wall of poo' which built up over time was a bit of a trial, too, opposite the 'wall of pee'.

* possibly more accurate to say that the role was always theirs, although I don't know the full history.
Not just 21 and 23, other high priced STABs as well, but here is a pretty good illustration of the process (The third clip):

SAS ARTISTS RIFLES COMMEMORATIVE FILM [Allocated Title]
 
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#16
other high priced STABs
HAC first started to go down the more painful route in 71/2.
I've not seen those clips before! The MEXE shelter made for a cosy couple of weeks (which was as long as could realistically be managed) for four bodies and all the hide equipment/dems/personal kit, rations, water; four or five days was a serious effort, and respiratory issues were a problem. Note that all of the work digging the thing in and making it as invisible as possible had to be done at night. The clips don't show the dipole antennae, which had to be run up a convenient tree, or the internal arrangements including the viewing aperture.

When the shelter was first fully trialled over (IIRC) a ten-day period, the General who was hanging around* declared at the end of the exercise that he would be the first to congratulate the team inside, and when the trap was opened, he stuck his head down to say Hello. He then promptly vomited onto the head of the Sgt i/c. That wall of poo was a weapon, too.
* Hackett, I think.
 
#17
The clips don't show the dipole antennae, which had to be run up a convenient tree, or the ... ...viewing aperture..
Indeed, the two things without which the whole effort was pretty much useless, but at least the ptl comd lies down to check the field of view before digging.
 
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