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Spanish Air Force accidental weapon release.

#41
#42
Both. AIM-9 is shorter range, so less chance of it going cross-borders, but is heat seeking and non-discriminating: your buddy/an airliner better not be in its field of view at launch or during time of flight.

AIM-120 has much longer legs but is host guided (usually) and has less chance of inadvertent lock to a friendly. Less chance, not no chance; mode at launch dependant.
Cheers Ears
 
#43
Accidental weapon release, real damage caused, you say? This takes some beating.

1967 USS Forrestal fire - Wikipedia
Surely the Forrestal incident is different as the crew weren't trying to fire a missile or even simulating. The firing was caused by an issue with the aircraft's electrics as the missiles were armed below decks in order to lessen time spent on the flight deck.
The entire reason missiles had previously only be armed once on the flight deck was for safety.
 
#44
I was sent on a Flight Safety Officers course at the RAF building in Holburn, London in 1984. This incident was still a hot topic and was referenced in nearly every lecture and discussion ober four days as to 'the way to not do things'.

On the final day of the course we had a visit to AAIB at Farnborough to see how they conducted accident inquiries. We were having a brief by the head psychiatrist when he said 'I'd l;ike to have a word about the F4/Jag event. There was an audilbe groan from the room and he laughed and went on to list the reasons why "all the holes in the cheese" lined up that day and the crew were definately let down by the system.

Briefly the crew manned up in an unarmed aircraft but when that one went u/s the only available F4 was one that had just come off QRA and as it was at the heat of the Cold War the aircraft was fully armed. The only measure to counter this was to put some tape over a switch (or circuit-breaker - I can't remember). Sure enough thing conspired in the cramped cockpit and the tape came off (the rear-crew lad was quite hefty, perhaps it was a factor) thus rendering the aircraft fully-armed so when the crew went through their drills, WHOOOOOSH!

That's not the best bit though, as the trick-cyclist finished his brief he said 'If anyone needs more detail of this incident ask him!' And he pointed to one of our course-mates. 'He was in the back seat' The poor guy had sat for a week though all the lessons and briefings and not said a word!
 
#45
I was sent on a Flight Safety Officers course at the RAF building in Holburn, London in 1984. This incident was still a hot topic and was referenced in nearly every lecture and discussion ober four days as to 'the way to not do things'.

On the final day of the course we had a visit to AAIB at Farnborough to see how they conducted accident inquiries. We were having a brief by the head psychiatrist when he said 'I'd l;ike to have a word about the F4/Jag event. There was an audilbe groan from the room and he laughed and went on to list the reasons why "all the holes in the cheese" lined up that day and the crew were definately let down by the system.

Briefly the crew manned up in an unarmed aircraft but when that one went u/s the only available F4 was one that had just come off QRA and as it was at the heat of the Cold War the aircraft was fully armed. The only measure to counter this was to put some tape over a switch (or circuit-breaker - I can't remember). Sure enough thing conspired in the cramped cockpit and the tape came off (the rear-crew lad was quite hefty, perhaps it was a factor) thus rendering the aircraft fully-armed so when the crew went through their drills, WHOOOOOSH!

That's not the best bit though, as the trick-cyclist finished his brief he said 'If anyone needs more detail of this incident ask him!' And he pointed to one of our course-mates. 'He was in the back seat' The poor guy had sat for a week though all the lessons and briefings and not said a word!
Fecking OUCH!!!
 
#46
A 43 Sqn jet lost a Sargent Fletcher tank somewhere over the Cheviots. When it was found, it was sticking out of the arse of a very dead sheep.
Tremblers again.....I did the see in and was stood there staring at the jet with a spare Fletcher pin in my hand. Think it was our tame Gyrene who also blew both tanks off before leaving.
 
#47
Tremblers again.....I did the see in and was stood there staring at the jet with a spare Fletcher pin in my hand. Think it was our tame Gyrene who also blew both tanks off before leaving.

I stand corrected. Was it 43 that dropped a full centre-line tank whilst the jet was parked?
 
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#48
I was sent on a Flight Safety Officers course at the RAF building in Holburn, London in 1984. This incident was still a hot topic and was referenced in nearly every lecture and discussion ober four days as to 'the way to not do things'.

On the final day of the course we had a visit to AAIB at Farnborough to see how they conducted accident inquiries. We were having a brief by the head psychiatrist when he said 'I'd l;ike to have a word about the F4/Jag event. There was an audilbe groan from the room and he laughed and went on to list the reasons why "all the holes in the cheese" lined up that day and the crew were definately let down by the system.

Briefly the crew manned up in an unarmed aircraft but when that one went u/s the only available F4 was one that had just come off QRA and as it was at the heat of the Cold War the aircraft was fully armed. The only measure to counter this was to put some tape over a switch (or circuit-breaker - I can't remember). Sure enough thing conspired in the cramped cockpit and the tape came off (the rear-crew lad was quite hefty, perhaps it was a factor) thus rendering the aircraft fully-armed so when the crew went through their drills, WHOOOOOSH!

That's not the best bit though, as the trick-cyclist finished his brief he said 'If anyone needs more detail of this incident ask him!' And he pointed to one of our course-mates. 'He was in the back seat' The poor guy had sat for a week though all the lessons and briefings and not said a word!
The jet wasn't left loaded from Battle Flight - what RAFG called QRA.

The jet was loaded as part of the generation exercise. By an Arm Eng Flight load team, who knew nothing about any white tape because it was a local (bollocks) procedure in use on both sqns. Weak trade management IMO.

The jet was loaded correctly IAW the topic 6. Which stipulated copper lock wire to secure the Master Arm.

We normally downloaded prior to flying post 1980 but Stn Cmdr could and did in this case authorise flying with weapons. They forgot.
 
#49
"Que pasa? por que el Bombio go bangio?"
 
#50
Wasn't one of the lads on here on the weapons loading team that bombed up the Sea Harrier that bombed the Ark Royal back in '92.
@Trooped_Again if I remember correctly. Sure he has mentioned it.
 
#51
During a routine training exercise on 20 April 1992 a small practice bomb, released by a Sea Harrier aircraft, struck and penetrated the flight deck of HMS Ark Royal. Exercise involved practice bombing a surface target towed 500 yards asternl.

Six casualties suffered injuries, mainly burns; damage to the ship minor. Immediate repairs carried out allowing Ark to proceed with its task. Further repairs undertaken in Pompey. The cost of repairs around £60,000. Board of inquiry convened
 

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