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Space tourism

#7
A timely revival of a ten year old thread..... but it seems there's a few more problems to be ironed out before the first paying passenger steps on board Virgin Galactic

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-29857182
Test pilot dead and the other in a bad way...

This sort of tourism was only ever going to be for the uber-rich anyway but an interesting challenge all the same. Hope it doesn't set it back another ten years.
 
#11
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3712998.stm

taken a long while to reproduce what the x15 plane did on july 17th 1962

What Burt Rutan has done is impressive considering he did it without goverment backing. But where're still a long from a true space plane, this would have to

*travel at 25 times the speed of sound in order to reach earth orbit
and
*fly at 300km
Just to argue with a ten year old statement, because I'm bored while I wait for my breakfast to cook -

Branson's space plane isn't an orbital vehicle. It simply achieves sufficient altitude to experience weightlessness, floats around for 50 minutes or so and then returns to earth - or blows up. Whichever.

Without trawling the Nasa site for the exact data, the physics of 'orbit' mean that you achieve sufficient velocity as to match the curvature of the earth. So bodies in orbit do indeed fall at the same rate as anything here on earth.

At sea level, you can see I think, 9 miles from your vantage point - 6 feet or so above sea level. So, if you dropped a cannonball from 6 feet, it'd take say, one second to hit the deck. If you were to be able to project the cannonball those 9 miles in that second, then the curvature of the earth would have matched the drop of the ball and you'd have begun to achieve orbit of a sort.
 
#12
A timely revival of a ten year old thread..... but it seems there's a few more problems to be ironed out before the first paying passenger steps on board Virgin Galactic

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-29857182
Test pilot dead and the other in a bad way...

This sort of tourism was only ever going to be for the uber-rich anyway but an interesting challenge all the same. Hope it doesn't set it back another ten years.
And well done to SportBilly42 for using the search function.

Award him Jarrod's SPECIAL Priiiiize!
 

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