Space Archaeology?

Is an expended spacecraft stellar junk, rare metal salvage or an important historical artefact? Either way, if true, and particularly if recoverable, it's a pretty remarkable find.

'Astronomers believe they have found the lunar module from the Apollo 10 mission five decades after it was released into space by the crew. The module, measuring just four metres wide, was nicknamed Snoopy and was believed to have been lost forever in 900 million kilometres of space after it was jettisoned. Snoopy, named after the cartoon dog, was used as a practice run for the Apollo 11 lunar landing, to take place two months after Apollo 10 in July 1969. Two of the three astronauts transferred into it to fly above the Moon's surface. They then returned to the command module. After demonstrating the docking manoeuvre, the mission was over and Snoopy was shot off into space.

'Nick Howes, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, said he is certain it has been found and all they need is someone to go and retrieve it.'

https ://www.sbs.com.au/news/astronomers-believe-apollo-capsule-found
 
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4(T)

LE
The article is a bit light on the facts, how far away is it for one?


"900 million kilometres of space "

er, no indication if thats linear kilometres, square kilometres, cubic kilometres, or whatever type of kilometres space-time is measured in...
 

Thanks for that (despite the DM pollution and dodgy headline). I'd initially assumed it must be on the lunar surface, but then when talk of recovery came into it, went for in-orbit somewhere. To send a mission to the surface to recover an artefact is going to be a very big ask!

The latter is what the DM article also seems to say:

'But against the odds, it seems the astronomers have found this unique piece of space junk after spotting an object that looked 'odd'. 'It was a strange anomalous object in approximately the right orbit and exactly the right size. The radar data was completely whack, as one astronomer put it. It was like nothing we've ever seen. We're 99 percent convinced we've got it,' said Howes.'
 
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The LM wasn't designed for atmospheric re-entry, so they'd need something like the Space Shuttle to enclose it and return to earth. I wonder if the Falcon series of rockets could do it? The next gen is supposed to lift more than 100 tons.
 
Thanks for that (despite the DM pollution and dodgy headline). I'd initially assumed it must be on the lunar surface, but then when talk of recovery came into it, went for in-orbit somewhere. To send a mission to the surface to recover an artefact is going to be a very big ask!

The latter is what the DM article also seems to say:

'But against the odds, it seems the astronomers have found this unique piece of space junk after spotting an object that looked 'odd'. 'It was a strange anomalous object in approximately the right orbit and exactly the right size. The radar data was completely whack, as one astronomer put it. It was like nothing we've ever seen. We're 99 percent convinced we've got it,' said Howes.'
I recently read Aldrin's Encounter with Tiber.
Strongly recommend it.
 
That'll be one for Jeff Bezos then. He collects space junk, he recently salvaged some Saturn 5 booster.

 
That'll be one for Jeff Bezos then. He collects space junk, he recently salvaged some Saturn 5 booster.


Well, it will certainly take someone with very deep pockets and a hugely philanthropic/egotistical mindset to launch a mission to return Apollo 10 safely to Earth for the rest of us to goggle at.
 
pikeys-in-space.jpg
 

philc

LE
Is an expended spacecraft stellar junk, rare metal salvage or an important historical artefact? Either way, if true, and particularly if recoverable, it's a pretty remarkable find.

'Astronomers believe they have found the lunar module from the Apollo 10 mission five decades after it was released into space by the crew. The module, measuring just four metres wide, was nicknamed Snoopy and was believed to have been lost forever in 900 million kilometres of space after it was jettisoned. Snoopy, named after the cartoon dog, was used as a practice run for the Apollo 11 lunar landing, to take place two months after Apollo 10 in July 1969. Two of the three astronauts transferred into it to fly above the Moon's surface. They then returned to the command module. After demonstrating the docking manoeuvre, the mission was over and Snoopy was shot off into space.

'Nick Howes, a fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society, said he is certain it has been found and all they need is someone to go and retrieve it.'

https ://www.sbs.com.au/news/astronomers-believe-apollo-capsule-found


Omega did a snoopy watch to commemorate this mission, retail 2K now 10k plus, how do I know
 
Well, it will certainly take someone with very deep pockets and a hugely philanthropic/egotistical mindset to launch a mission to return Apollo 10 safely to Earth for the rest of us to goggle at.


That would be the Apollo 10 Lunar Module that looks exactly like this one in the Science Museum in London.

london-kensington214big.jpg


and this one in the Smithsonian

800px-Lunar_Module_in_Smithsonian.jpg



and this one in The Cradle of Aviation Museum in New York

6c7971869-110831-coslog-apollo18-245p.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000.jpg


So it's not as if we don't have a few knocking about the place.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
That would be the Apollo 10 Lunar Module that looks exactly like this one in the Science Museum in London.

View attachment 397731

and this one in the Smithsonian

View attachment 397733


and this one in The Cradle of Aviation Museum in New York

View attachment 397734

So it's not as if we don't have a few knocking about the place.

important historical artifact.

the ones you all refer to are either replicas, test articles or (obviously) unflown ships.

kind of like the difference between the big fibreglass Spitfires and Hurris you can get for display and one that was actually flown in anger during the Battle. one has an authenticity and provenance the other obviously won't.

however, is recovering it cost/effective? probably not as technology stands at this time. you'd need something that could a. fit it (I don't think the ascent stage would fit a Shuttle bay, even if it was still flying) and B. go out and get it (the shuttle was LEO only and couldn't get much higher than 1000km, and evn then that would be with next to no payload).
 
That'll be one for Jeff Bezos then. He collects space junk, he recently salvaged some Saturn 5 booster.


Looks like he might have some more to collect soon.

'Part of a huge rocket that launched China’s first module for its Tianhe space station is falling back to Earth and could make an uncontrolled re-entry at an unknown landing point.

'The 30-metre high core of the Long March 5B rocket launched the “Heavenly Harmony” unmanned core module into low Earth orbit on 29 April from Wenchang in China’s Hainan province. The Long March 5B then itself entered a temporary orbit, setting the stage for one of the largest ever uncontrolled re-entries. Some experts fear it could land on an inhabited area.

“Last time they launched a Long March 5B rocket they ended up with big long rods of metal flying through the sky and damaging several buildings in the Ivory Coast,” he said. “Most of it burned up, but there were these enormous pieces of metal that hit the ground. We are very lucky no one was hurt.”

'On Tuesday the core was orbiting Earth around every 90 minutes at about 27,600km/h and an altitude of more than 300km. The US military has named it 2021-035B and its path can be seen on websites including orbit.ing-now.com. Since the weekend it has dropped nearly 80km in altitude and SpaceNews reported that amateur ground observations showed it was tumbling and not under control.

'Since 1990 nothing over 10 tonnes has been deliberately left in orbit to re-enter uncontrolled. The Long March 5B core stage is thought to be about 21 tonnes. “What’s bad is that it’s really negligent on China’s part. Things more than ten tonnes we don’t let them fall out of the sky uncontrolled deliberately,” McDowell said.


 

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