South Wales Earthquake

#21
Strange.
I'm literally on the fault line, No one up this way felt anything much.

However, that fault line extends underwater past the southern coast of Ireland. (Iirc). Be a bit of a bugger along the Severn estuary if it went of underwater out there.
 
#22
Strange.
I'm literally on the fault line, No one up this way felt anything much.

However, that fault line extends underwater past the southern coast of Ireland. (Iirc). Be a bit of a bugger along the Severn estuary if it went of underwater out there.
I suppose that's why @NSP felt it Taunton way while 20ish miles further east we didn't.
 
#23
I don’t think the earthquake was caused by a fault-line moving. The British Isles are tectonically stable but still have geological instability.

More likely the result of the ground springing back up in response to the ice sheets retreating.
 
#26
I don’t think the earthquake was caused by a fault-line moving. The British Isles are tectonically stable but still have geological instability.

More likely the result of the ground springing back up in response to the ice sheets retreating.
Also with shocks being felt near or far is to do with the geological conditions underneath.
 
#27
I don’t think the earthquake was caused by a fault-line moving. The British Isles are tectonically stable but still have geological instability.

More likely the result of the ground springing back up in response to the ice sheets retreating.
Faults aren't just at plate boundaries. We identify small ones all the time when using a sub-bottom profiler on route surveys in the North Sea. Our mountainous areas are riddled with them.



Geological Society - Faults
 
#28
This isn't the North Sea but it shows faulting as seen on a sub-bottom record:-

 
#31
I posted this in the other thread so I might as well repost it here.

Could anyone who experienced the tremors help fellow rockbashers at the British Geological Survey by filling out a brief questionnaire here:

BGS Earthquake Questionnaire[/QUOTE
Didn't experience anything. But reading the BGS report I'm amazed at the number of quakes in uk. 19 since Christmas, OK most are very low who'd of thunk it.



CFB
 
#33
Strange.
I'm literally on the fault line, No one up this way felt anything much.

However, that fault line extends underwater past the southern coast of Ireland. (Iirc). Be a bit of a bugger along the Severn estuary if it went of underwater out there.
Great day to be doing the Severn Bore though.

A combination of events not seen since some blokes dressed up as Stormtroopers to do it.

 
#34
I felt it, I was in Morristown hospital and there was a sudden thud and the ward shook for a second or two. It felt like something had driven into the side of the building. Very weird.
 
#35
Strange.
I'm literally on the fault line, No one up this way felt anything much.

However, that fault line extends underwater past the southern coast of Ireland. (Iirc). Be a bit of a bugger along the Severn estuary if it went of underwater out there.
1610 ish, most of the Somerset levels, South Wales, Southern Ireland, experienced a significant tsunami. It could easily happen again.
 
#37
Quite devastating here in Wales

Dsc00997 (Small).jpg
 
#38
This isn't the North Sea but it shows faulting as seen on a sub-bottom record:-

Blimey. That wafts me straight back to the mid 70s when I worked in the Playback department of a geophysical company. Spent all day producing charts like that, only on a much larger scale (kilometres deep and tens of kilometres across)* We printed them out on plain photographic paper and as transparencies. The former were called “roughs” and the latter “fines”. It always made me chuckle that they were the end result of hundreds of millions of pounds worth of hi-tec and the best name they could come up with was roughs and fines.

I know there are thousands of fault lines across the British Isles. None of them (like the slip faults in the diagram above) are geologically active. As we are well inside the Eurasian plate there is no tectonic activity which would affect these faults. There is geophysical activity in that Northern Europe is rising slowly to retain equilibrium and I reckon that was the cause.

My favourite fault (I know, I know) is actually a “disturbance” (a combination of faulting and folding) and is called the Saron Disturbance. Preciousss


*the scale, not the charts.
 
#40
Is there any dataset I can look at to transpire the lines over an OS map?
Google - “Digital Geological Map of Great Britain, information notes, 2013
Alan Smith”

Millions of links to geological mapping. Probably your best starter for ten.

I guess the issue is that geological maps don’t typically bother with the topology (geomorphology) and OS Maps don’t bother with the geology.
 

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